Poet Kostas Anagnopoulos Shares His Favorite Artworks from Artnet Galleries

The Chicago-born, New York-based poet and designer lets his passion for words and beautiful objects guide his career.

Kostas Anagnopoulos. Image courtesy of Kostas Anagnopoulos.
Kostas Anagnopoulos. Image by Victor Schrager.

Kostas Anagnopoulos is a creative in every sense of the word.

Whether he is working to provide award-winning services to clients in the gift, home, jewelry, and personal-accessories industries, or teaching poetry remotely with Creative Growth in San Francisco, Kostas is a master at aesthetics. 

After more than 20 years of working closely with visionary merchants and top retailers, Kostas opened Pidgin, a store in Oak Hill, New York, to sell the things that he loves, from antiques and old objects, to a selection of beautifully crafted new items. 

We caught up with Kostas to hear about his bucket-list destination, what he’s read recently, and some of his favorite works available right now from Artnet Galleries.

Kostas’ Favorite Things

Movie: Daguerréotypes by Agnes Varda

Restaurant: Prune

Bucket-list destination: Easter Island

Artist: Florine Stettheimer

Food to eat for breakfast: Whitefish salad on a toasted bialy with red onion, capers, and a squeeze of lemon

Museum: The Kimbell Art Museum.

Book you’ve read recently: Days by Simone Kearney

Artist in your collection: Jack Whitten

Design object: Olfa touch-knife

Party favor: A book of contemporary poetry

Way to celebrate success: Nachos and orange wine

 

Top Gallery Picks

 

Jane Freilicher
Parts of a World (1987)

Courtesy of Kasmin.

 

Bill Traylor
Blue Basket (1939–42)

Courtesy of Ricco/Maresca.

Prunella Clough
Interior (1988)

Courtesy of Flowers Gallery.

 

Theodoros Stamos
“Infinity Field-Lefkada” Series (1981)

Courtesy of Hollis Taggart.

Joan Brown
Figure #26 (1970)

Courtesy of George Adams Gallery.

 

Alvin Baltrop
The Piers (Hudson River) (1975–86)

Courtesy of Galerie Buchholz.

 

Minnie Evans
Untitled (Wing Figures) (1942–43)

Courtesy of ZQ Art Gallery.

 

James Van Der Zee
Broadway Delicatessen (ca. 1925)

Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery.


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