Kazumi Tanaka, Sunflower - Himawari. Courtesy of the artist and the High Line.

The High Line—a 1.45-mile-long elevated park on a converted railroad line, filled with verdant plants and an array of contemporary art installations—is one of the gems of Manhattan.

Free and accessible public art has long been a draw for High Line visitors. The latest iteration in the park’s revolving art program is the Plinth commission, which has been occupied by Simone Leigh’s towering female bust Brick House since 2019. Now, the High Line wants the public to weigh in on the next work to take pride of place, with 80 artist submissions to choose from for the next two commissions, set to appear in 2022 and 2024.

So, what do you want to see rising above the city at 30th Street and 10th Avenue? Below, see a selection of proposals and then visit the High Line website by the end of September to comment.

Nick Cave, A·mal·gam. Courtesy of the artist and the High Line.

Iván Argote, Dinosaur. Courtesy of the artist and the High Line.

Meriem Bennani, Bouncy Storm. Courtesy of the artist and the High Line.

Bronwyn Katz, Untitled (roots). Courtesy of the artist and the High Line.

Mary Sibande, Old Wars are Out and a New Reason of Humanity is In. Courtesy of the High Line.

Carlos Motta, Koray Duman, and Theodore Kerr, THE VOID. Courtesy of the artists and the High Line.

Amanda Williams, Sandra’s refuge: Safe Passage for Free Movement in Public Space.

Banu Cennetoğlu, right?. Courtesy of the artist and the High Line.

Willie Cole, Totem. Courtesy of the artist and High Line.

Nina Beier, Women & Children. Courtesy of the artist and the High Line.


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