A New Show in Denver Offers a Sweeping 500-Year History of Images of British-ness in Art—See It Here

While museums are closed to the public, we are spotlighting an inspiring exhibition somewhere around the globe each day.

Thomas Hudson, The Radcliffe Family (ca. 1742). Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.
Thomas Hudson, The Radcliffe Family (ca. 1742). Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

While museums around the globe are closed to the public, we are spotlighting each day an inspiring exhibition that was previously on view. Even if you can’t see it in person, allow us to give you a virtual look. 

 

Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection
Denver Art Museum

 

What the museums says: “‘Treasures of British Art’ presents 500 years of British cultural history through the stories of its people, captured by the enduring brilliance of artists of the time. The exhibition features devotional images, portraits, landscapes, and sporting scenes by the greatest artists of the British School—including Thomas Gainsborough, Thomas Lawrence, and John Constable—as well as non-British artists who spent significant time in Britain—such as the Flemish artist Anthony van Dyck, and American artists Benjamin West and John Singer Sargent.”

Why it’s worth a look: While travel plans have been put on hold indefinitely, the Denver Art Museum’s exhibition displaying works from the Berger collection of European paintings feels especially timely. Without having to leave the comfort of home, viewers can see the largesse of the Berger Educational Trust, whose gift of some 60 artworks constitutes this show.

The list of artists included in the show read like a who’s who of British and Anglophile, with highlights spanning from George Stubbs’s elegant equine portraits to a delicate unfinished work by John Singer Sargent.

What it looks like:

Installation view, "Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection." Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

Installation view of “Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection.” Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

John Singer Sargent, <i>Rosina Ferrera, Head of a Capri Girl</i> (1878). Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

John Singer Sargent, Rosina Ferrera, Head of a Capri Girl (1878). Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

Installation view, "Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection." Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

Installation view of “Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection.” Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

British artist, Three Young Girls (early 1600s). Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

Installation view, "Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection." Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

Installation view of “Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection.” Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

Thomas Gainsborough, A Coastal Landscape (ca. 1782-84). Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

Installation view, "Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection." Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

Installation view of “Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection.” Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

Anthony van Dyck, <i>Dorothy, Lady Dacre</i> (ca. 1633). Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

Anthony van Dyck, Dorothy, Lady Dacre (ca. 1633). Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

Installation view, "Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection." Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.

Installation view of “Treasures of British Art: The Berger Collection.” Courtesy of the Denver Art Museum.


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