See What Galleries Are Bringing to Art LA Contemporary

The fair is reintroducing the "Freeways" section devoted to young galleries.

Holton Rower, With You I Step Lightly. Courtesy of The Hole.

The eighth edition of Art Los Angeles Contemporary (ALAC) opens January 26 at Barker Hangar at the Santa Monica airport, with over 60 local and international exhibitors. The fair continues to gather momentum as it presents a vibrant roster of the city’s top galleries alongside East Coast and international booths.

This year sees new exhibitors from Asia and Latin America, including 10 Chancery Lane from Hong Kong, 313 Art Project from Seoul, and Vermelho from Sao Paulo. Many galleries will be returning to the fair including M+B, Josh Lilley, and Kayne Griffin Corcoran, which will present a selection of paintings and drawings by David Lynch.

The fair is also reintroducing the “Freeways” section, which focuses on young galleries, including Club Pro, and Jenny’s, both of Los Angeles, and Queer Thoughts, from New York.

It will be interesting this time around to see how the lack of art fair competition—Paramount Ranch wrapped up its third and final edition last year and the LA Art Show ran earlier this month—might impact or even strengthen ALAC’s attendance.

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Marc LeBlanc is curating the programming schedule for “Anything You Sow” at the ALAC Theatre. The initiative focuses on performative work by composer William Basinski, screenings by Pat O’Neill, a talk by performance artist Jasmine Nyende, filmmaker Roger Corman and Mary Woronov in conversation with collective Veggiecloud.

Kathleen Ryan, <i>Bacchante</i> (2016). Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane

Kathleen Ryan, Bacchante (2016). Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane.

Downtown LA gallery Francois Ghebaly will show a selection of its artist stable, but is focusing in particular on works by Kathleen Ryan. The gallery will be opening her first US solo exhibition on Friday, January 27 (7-10 p.m.) in conjunction with the fair.

Nick Goss <i>Clearing</i> (2016) Courtesy the artist and Josh Lilley Gallery, London

Nick Goss Clearing (2016) Courtesy the artist and Josh Lilley Gallery, London.

“I am coming back for my fifth successive year,” London dealer Josh Lilley told artnet News. “So I do have a strong sense of what has proved successful. Last year we did a mixed presentation. We sold everything, and so this year I am coming back with a two-artist display;  painter Nick Goss, and sculptor Henna Vainio.” Lilley said that the gallery has exhibited Goss in London, and has had “displays in Miami, Frieze, Paris, and New York.”

Lilley continued: “This is the first time we have shown Henna, and I am really excited by what she is doing. We are hoping the combination with Goss will prove a success.”

Adam Henry, <i>The Power of 9</i> courtesy of the artist and Tracy Williams Ltd.,

Adam Henry, The Power of 9 courtesy of the artist and Tracy Williams Ltd.

Tracy Williams will be showing New York-based artist Adam Henry with a new suite of paintings that challenge perception using a four-color model. The artist reconfigures color to explore logic through repetition and variation. It also becomes a political act. “In a time when perception is being radically challenged by the believability of information, Henry’s painted conundrums become all the more timely,” said a spokesperson for the gallery.

Liz Craft, Clock (Lavender) (2016). Courtesy of Jenny's.

Liz Craft, Clock (Lavender)
(2016). Courtesy of Jenny’s.

“We are looking forward to ALAC,” Jenny Borland, co-director of the offbeat Jenny’s gallery on Sunset Boulevard. “We participated in Paramount Ranch the last few years so it will be interesting to see how they compare, mainly in terms of the audience,” she said. “We were flattered to be included as one of the few younger galleries and are optimistic about meeting both local people and visitors who may not be familiar with our program.”

Jenny’s booth contains a solo presentation of works by Liz Craft, many of which were featured in the exhibition “Mirror Cells” at the Whitney Museum this past summer.

Devin Troy Strothers, <i>Water Cooler Talk</i> (2016) Courtesy the artist and Club Pro Los Angeles

Devin Troy Strothers, Water Cooler Talk (2016) Courtesy the artist and Club Pro Los Angeles.

Other local galleries are also dipping their toes into the water. “ALAC will be our first fair,” Carlye Packer director of downtown gallery Club Pro told artnet News via email. “As such a new gallery (under 9 months old), it is incredible to work with ALAC; they have been extremely supportive and encouraging. Our booth will host a project with Devin Troy Strother titled Water Cooler Talk—a play on the cubicle / booth. Devin is creating an office environment, she says. “It will be on the border of being extremely commercial and experimental / project-oriented booth.”

Site specific work at ALAC by artists Rafa Esparza and Timo Fahler. Courtesy the artists and Club Pro

Through, a site specific work at ALAC by artists Rafa Esparza and Timo Fahler. Courtesy the artists and Club Pro.

ALAC will also feature a number of on-site installations by local artists Rafa Esparza and Timo Fahler, courtesy of Club Pro, and performances by the artist known as Puppies Puppies.

Packer described the installation as “the second iteration of a collaborative installation,” which debuted in September. This iteration will be titled Through.

Jane Corrigan, <i>Girl and Cat</i> (2016) Courtesy the artist and Marinaro, New York.

Jane Corrigan, Girl and Cat (2016) Courtesy the artist and Marinaro, New York.

There are also some new galleries from the East Coast ready to participate. “We’ll be showing at the fair as Marinaro, which is my new gallery. I’m taking over from Zach Feuer and Joel Mesler,” Lauren Marinaro explained to artnet News via email. “We’ll be showing Jane Corrigan and Phil Wagner. We wanted to have two strong solo booths and give exposure to Jane in LA and highlight Phil in his home city,” Marinaro wrote, noting, “I’m looking forward to seeing a lot of LA galleries and the younger section.”

David Lynch, <i>Divided Head</i>. Courtesy Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles

David Lynch, Divided Head. Courtesy Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles

 

Jaimie Warren,<i>Self-portrait as an Ice-Cream Cone/Self-portrait as a Conehead in Those 3 ice-creams Totally Looks like the Cone-heads from SNL by anonnny</i><br /> (2016). Courtesy of The Hole.

Jaimie Warren,Self-portrait as an Ice-Cream Cone/Self-portrait as a Conehead in Those 3 ice-creams Totally Looks like the Cone-heads from SNL by anonnny
(2016). Courtesy of The Hole.

Koak, <i>Blonde</i> (2016). Courtesy of Alter Space.

Koak, Blonde (2016). Courtesy of Alter Space.

 

Liz Craft, Spider Woman Purple Dress (2015). Courtesy the artist and Jenny's, Los Angeles.

Liz Craft, Spider Woman Purple Dress (2015). Courtesy the artist and Jenny’s, Los Angeles.

Todd Norsten, <i>the Future the Past</i> (2016). Courtesy of Adams and Ollman.

Todd Norsten, the Future the Past (2016). Courtesy of Adams and Ollman.

 

Daniel Gordon, <i>Smoke Bush and Nectarine Shadow</i> (2016). Courtesy of M+B Gallery

Daniel Gordon, Smoke Bush and Nectarine Shadow (2016). Courtesy of M+B Gallery

Jan Albers, <i>cAmpAricAmp</i><br /> (2016). Courtesy of 1301PE

Jan Albers, cAmpAricAmp
(2016). Courtesy of 1301PE

 

John M. Miller, <i>Untitled (Black Ochre SD)</i><br /> (2001). Courtesy of Peter Blake Gallery

John M. Miller, Untitled (Black Ochre SD)
(2001). Courtesy of Peter Blake Gallery

Adam Silverman, <i>Untitled</i><br /> 2016. Courtesy of Cherry and Martin

Adam Silverman, Untitled
2016. Courtesy of Cherry and Martin

 

Jibade-Khalil Huffman, <i>Laying on Hands</i><br /> (2016). Courtesy of Anat Ebgi

Jibade-Khalil Huffman, Laying on Hands
(2016). Courtesy of Anat Ebgi

Chris HUEN Sin Kan, <i>Haze</i><br /> (2016). Courtesy of Gallery EXIT.

Chris HUEN Sin Kan, Haze
(2016). Courtesy of Gallery EXIT.

 

Huang Rui, Space Structure 84-19 (1984). Courtesy of 10 Chancery Lane.

Huang Rui, Space Structure 84-19
(1984). Courtesy of 10 Chancery Lane.

Jagoda Bednarsky, <i>Not yet titled</i> (2016). Courtesy of PPC Philipp Pflug Contemporary

Jagoda Bednarsky, Not yet titled (2016). Courtesy of PPC Philipp Pflug Contemporary

Gracie DeVito,<i>Maize in the Middle</i><br /> (2016). Courtesy of TIF SIGFRIDS

Gracie DeVito,Maize in the Middle
(2016). Courtesy of TIF SIGFRIDS

Marjolijn de Wit, <i>Untitled (MDW026)</i><br /> (2015). Courtesy of Asya Geisberg Gallery.

Marjolijn de Wit, Untitled (MDW026)
(2015). Courtesy of Asya Geisberg Gallery.

 


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