See the Top 10 Booths at NADA Miami Beach

This year 110 galleries from 17 countries made the trip.

Rachel Uffner, New York. Photo: courtesy Rachel Uffner, New York.

The New Art Dealers’ Alliance, which focuses on fresh, emerging artists and young galleries, opened on Thursday to VIPs after returning to its charming original home at the Deauville Hotel in North Beach.

This year 110 galleries from 17 countries made the trip to Miami to show their wares, including 43 first-time exhibitors. Dealers put on a strong show at Art Basel Miami Beach’s principle satellite fair with some of the exhibitors showing artists that were also represented at the larger event.

It was an idyllic setting for an art fair, placed as it was against the backdrop of sun-drenched Southern Florida with its panoramic views of the beach, ocean, and palm trees that sway lazily in the wind. Collectors browsed items as art world insiders, including prominent advisor Lisa Schiff and curator Klaus Biesenbach, were in attendance to see the works on show at the fair.

Here we select the standouts, the top ten exhibitors at the fair (in no particular order).

Kai Matsumiya, New York. Photo: courtesy of Pedro Wirz.

Kai Matsumiya, New York. Photo: courtesy of Pedro Wirz.

1. Kai Matsumiya, New York

Showing works by Brazilian artists Pedro Wirz, Gabriel Lima, Craig Kalpakjian as well as pieces by Phillip Metten, the New York gallery’s booth stood out for its subdued, conceptually grounded palette amongst showings characterized by color and luminosity. “I feel like it’s good,” gallerist Kai Matsumiya told artnet News when asked about the atmosphere at the fair. “It’s a strong fair that can stand on its own and doesn’t necessarily need to compete with Art Basel.”

Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

2. Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles

Taking a solo presentation by the Los Angeles artist Rosha Yaghmai, the West Coast outfit made a splash with their first participation at NADA. The artist’s fiberglass and acrylic wall pieces and sculptural works made from found corrective lenses and iron pipes populated the booth, and the works stood out for their ingenuity and originality. “This is our first time at NADA, and we feel it’s a perfect venue for young artists such as Rosa Yaghmai,” director Genevieve Day told artnet News. “So far it’s been fantastic” she continued, “we’ve already met a lot of clients and made new connections.”

James Fuentes, New York. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

James Fuentes, New York. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

3. James Fuentes, New York

The New York dealer showed a solo booth dedicated to the American landscape painter John McAllister. The vibrantly colored canvasses were extremely popular with collectors and visitors, who flooded the booth to admire the works, which are characterized by their unique palette of fluorescent orange, purple, and turquoise. “The fair’s been very good for use so far,” Fuentes said. “This is the most energetic place globally at this time of year so why wouldn’t we be here?”

Proyectos Ultravioleta, Guatemala City. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

Proyectos Ultravioleta, Guatemala City. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

4. Proyectos Ultravioleta, Guatemala City

Making the trip from Guatemala the gallery dedicated its booth to a host of captivating artists including Costa Rican painter Federico Herrero, Juni Figueroa, and Akira Ikezoe. Decorated with colorful tatami-style mats and leafy floor paneling to complement the works on the walls, the booth immediately caught the eye with its playful presentation. “NADA is a place to have fun and experiment with the booths,” director Stefan Benchoam told artnet News. “We don’t take ourselves too seriously. We like to have fun and show that to the people.”

Union Pacific, London. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

Union Pacific, London. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

5. Union Pacific, London

The London gallery showed a solo booth with several works by the highly rated emerging German painter Max Ruf. “Max is interested in getting snapshots of landscape,” gallerist Nigel Dunkley explained. “They are abstract but informed through landscape. It’s an investigation of line and unexplainable forms that keep getting referenced, dictated by the subconscious.” The painterly abstract works were amongst the most interesting offerings on show.

Rachel Uffner, New York. Photo: courtesy Rachel Uffner, New York.

Rachel Uffner, New York. Photo: courtesy Rachel Uffner, New York.

6. Rachel Uffner, New York

One of the most eclectic booths, New York dealer Racel Uffner brought artworks by abstract painter Hayal Pozanti, as well as works by Curtis Talwst Santiago, and the playful and colorful paintings of geometric exercising figures painted by Leonhard Hurzlmeier. The booth was bright, colorful, and included a healthy dose of irony given the South Floridian setting.

Night Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

Night Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

7. Night Gallery, Los Angeles

Ironically it was Night Gallery’s booth that shone brightest at NADA Miami Beach due to three large Mira Dancy works depicting neon-lit dancers. The booth also included paintings by the artist as well as canvasses by Marisa Tackal, David Korty, and Samara Golden. The Los Angeles gallery’s carefully curated booth exemplified a well-balanced presentation in the difficult art fair context.

Capital Gallery, San Francisco. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

Capital Gallery, San Francisco. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

8. Capital, San Francisco

The Bay Area gallery broke the mold by renting a hotel room on the 12th floor at NADA’s venue to show the works of artist/dealer Joel Mesler for the duration of the fair. Mesler transformed the room to resemble a waiting room in a psychology clinic, which he decorated with his paintings. The room even included relaxing scented candles. Gallerist Bob Linder explained that Mesler is interested in the concept of psychology and coming to terms with being a failed artist, but emphasized that the artist intended the concept to be very much tongue in cheek.

Raster, Warsaw. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

Raster, Warsaw. Photo: Henri Neuendorf

9. Raster, Warsaw

Making the trip to Miami Beach all the way from Poland, the gallery offered a Polish-American dialogue with their presented artworks. The booth included works by Rafał Bujnowski and Aneta Grzeszykowska contrasted with woven works by Mika Tajima and paintings by Michelle Rawlings. “We like it here,” Magdalena Kobus of Raster told artnet News. “We used to do NADA some time ago and came back after a successful year last year.”

Queer Thoughts, New York. Photo: Henri Neuendorf.

Queer Thoughts, New York. Photo: Henri Neuendorf.

10. Queer Thoughts, New York/What Pipeline, Detroit

One of the most poignant and politically relevant booths, New York outfit Queer Thoughts anchored their presentation around an American flag floor piece by artist Puppies Puppies. On the wall the artist showed a trigger taken from a gun, rendering the weapon redundant. “It was conceived before the election,” director Sam Lipp admitted, “but afterwards we pushed to make it happen.”


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