Price Check! Here’s What Sold—and For How Much—at the 2021 Edition of FIAC in Paris

Here's what dealers claim they sold as the art world descended upon Paris.

FIAC at Grand Palais Ephemere on October 20, 2021 in Paris, France. (Photo by Bertrand Rindoff Petroff/Getty Images)
FIAC took place at the Grand Palais Ephémère in Paris, October 21–25, 2021. Photo by Bertrand Rindoff Petroff/Getty Images.

After a five-day run, the Foire Internationale d’Art Contemporain (FIAC) art fair in Paris ended on a high note, with more than 46,000 visitors entering the Grand Palais Ephémère—30 percent smaller than its usual venue—to see what the 171 exhibitors had on display.

As the final event in a month chock-full of fairs across Europe and Asia, the shine had worn off for some attendees. But the thrill of Paris persists, and many galleries reported significant sales, if not as many high-ticket items as were sold at Art Basel or Frieze London. In a post- mortem of the fair, organizers noted that Georg Baselitz’s paintings and works on paper were “particularly popular,” due in no small part to the concurrent presentation of his retrospective at the Centre Georges Pompidou.

Galleries reported sales (if not actual figures), which could mean anything from disappointing numbers to touchy collectors not keen on having the cost of their new trophies disclosed. Perrotin sold works by Chen Ke, Jens Fänge, Jean-Michel Othoniel, and Yves Laloyin, while Tina Kim Gallery found homes for Ghada Amer’s The Hunter-RFGA (2020), Park Seo-Bo’s ECRITURE NO. 040620 (2020), and Kim Tschang-Yeul’s Waterdrops from 1985.

Other sales came from Bucharest-based Suprainfinit, who were first-timers at the fair, and reported placing works by Romanian artists Ana Lupas and Mircea Spătaru in private collections, with interest from a museum. Local gallery Kreo reported selling several historical works ranging in price from €20,000 to €50,000 ($23,000 to $58,000), while Sultana said it had sold “almost everything” in a presentation by Paul Maheke, for prices between €5,000 and €10,000 ($6,000 to $12,000). Applicat-Prazan, another Paris gallery, reported selling two paintings for more than $1 million, and at Berlin’s Klemm’s gallery, many collectors purchased body-prints by Keltie Ferris with pieces price at between $12,500 and $20,000.

We’ve rounded up reported sales from the French fair below. As always, keep in mind that some dealers occasionally (and maybe even not so occasionally!) report inflated prices because it looks good for business, while others prefer to give asking prices or price ranges. We do not include sales unaccompanied by figures, so the galleries that tend to disclose numbers are disproportionately represented here. All prices are converted to USD for ease of reading.

PAINTINGS

Robert Rauschenberg, Star Grass (1963). © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation/ARS, New York 2021, Photo: Ulrich Ghezzi. Courtesy of Thaddaeus Ropac.

$2.8 million: Robert Rauschenberg, Star Grass (1963), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$1.55 million: A new painting by George Condo at Hauser and Wirth

$1.4 million: Georg Baselitz, Bad im Flur (2021), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$1 million: A painting by Alice Neel at Xavier Hufkens

$1 million: Luc Tuymans, Dad’s Heat (2013), at Zeno X Gallery

$800,000: A painting by Alice Neel at Xavier Hufkens

$600,000: Alex Katz’s Olivia 1 (2021), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$500,000: A painting by Kehinde Wiley at Templon

$500,000: A powdered-charcoal painting by Glenn Ligon at Galerie Chantal Crousel

$400,000: Josef Albers, Study for a Variant/Adobe (1947), at David Zwirner

$280,000: Yan Pei-Ming, Golden Eagle (2021), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$232,000: Martha Jungwirth, Der Hund (2020), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$225,000: A large gouache by Louise Bourgeois at Xavier Hufkens

$200,000: Miriam Cahn, Meine Wege 23.09.2018, at Galerie Jocelyn Wolff

$192,000: Miquel Barceló, Esquisse Spanish Ballet (2021), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$150,000 to $200,000: Hernan Bas, The Albatross (2021), at Perrotin

$83,000: A painting by Tracey Emin at Xavier Hufkens

$52,000: Martha Jungwirth, Metope VI (2021), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$46,000: Martha Jungwirth, Metope III (2021), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$35,000: Pélagie Gbaguidi, Icon in Progress XL (2015–16), at Zeno X Gallery

$27,000: Marina Rheingantz, Jangada (2021), at Zeno X Gallery

$21,000: Rachel Jones SMIIILLLLEEEE (2021), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$1,500 to $4,500 each: Seven paintings by Kazuyuki Takezaki and Reina Sugihara at Misako and Rosen

 

SCULPTURES & MIXED MEDIA

Martin Margiela, Torso I, II, III (2018-2021). Photo: Studio Shapiro.

Martin Margiela, Torso I, II, III (2018–21). Photo: Studio Shapiro.

$850,000: A seascape by Rashid Johnson at Hauser & Wirth

$700,000: A sculpture by Lynda Benglis at Xavier Hufkens

$551,000: A sculpture by Antony Gormley at Xavier Hufkens

$551,000: Antony Gormley, SKEW II (2020), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$400,000: A sculpture by Louise Bourgeois at Xavier Hufkens

$400,000: Antony Gormley, BARE IV (2014), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$320,000: A sculpture by Pierre Huyghe at Galerie Chantal Crousel

$116,000: Mark Manders, Two Dry Clay Heads (2020–21), at Zeno X Gallery

$89,000 each: An edition of six sculptures by Tracey Emin at Xavier Hufkens

$80,000: Alvaro Barrington, Street dreams are made of this, series the voice of his streets (2021), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$76,000: A neon by Tracey Emin at Xavier Hufkens

$58,000 each: Three editions of Martin Margiela’s Torso III (pale) (2018–21), at Zeno X Gallery

$58,000: Sven ‘t Jolle’s Out of Touch (2019), presented in the Jardin des Tuileries, at Galerie Laurent Godin

$52,000 each: Martin Margiela, Torso II (plaster) (2018–21), at Zeno X Gallery

$45,000: Martin Margiela, Torso I (medium) (2018–21), at Zeno X Gallery

$45,000: A mask by Thomas Houseago at Xavier Hufkens

$23,000: Martin Margiela, Kit (2020), at Zeno X Gallery

 

PHOTOGRAPHS, PRINTS, & WORKS ON PAPER

Installation view of Xavier Hufkens booth at FIAC. Photo : Sebastiano Pellion. Courtesy: the Artist and Xavier Hufkens, Brussels

Installation view of the Xavier Hufkens booth at FIAC. Photo: Sebastiano Pellion. Courtesy of the artist and Xavier Hufkens, Brussels.

$150,000: Marlene Dumas, Leo (2001), at Zeno X Gallery

$150,000: A photograph by Robert Mapplethorpe at Xavier Hufkens

$120,000: Georg Baselitz, Ohne Titel (2021), at Thaddaeus Ropac

$87,000 each: Three red ink-on-paper works by Georg Baselitz at Thaddaeus Ropac

$50,00: Marlene Dumas, Die Kaapster (1990), at Zeno X Gallery

$28,000 to $41,000 each: Multiple gouaches by Tracey Emin at Xavier Hufkens

$7,000: Cristof Yvoré, Untitled (2013), at Zeno X Gallery

$5,200: Pélagie Gbaguidi, Care (2020), at Zeno X Gallery


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