10 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Erwin Wurm, Urinal, 2019. Courtesy of Lehmann Maupin
Erwin Wurm, Urinal, 2019. Courtesy of Lehmann Maupin

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

Pino Deodato
Pensierini domestici
Dep Art
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Pino Deodato, Pensierini domestici (2017). Courtesy of Dep Art Gallery.

Pino Deodato, Pensierini Domestici (2017). Courtesy of Dep Art Gallery.

In this small, sculptural depiction of a bedroom, a man is seated alone with his books. Nevertheless, he appears connected to the larger universe in a surreal and fanciful way. Where there would typically be a bedroom wall, instead we see the night sky and planets fill his room. There are no phones or computers here. Instead, it is through the power of books and imagination that the man appears transported. 

—Alexandra Schott

Yigal Ozeri
Liz
Corridor Contemporary
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Yigal Ozeri, Liz. Courtesy of Corridor Contemporary.

Yigal Ozeri, Liz. Courtesy of Corridor Contemporary.

While this certainly looks like a photograph, closer inspection reveals the image to be a hyper-realistic oil painting. Pictured here is rockstar Mick Jagger’s daughter Lizzy, shown in a snowy landscape, by Israeli artist Yigal Ozeri.  

—Tobias Molitor

Mao Xuhui
Lying Chair, Bright Sky
Tang Contemporary Art
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Mao Xuhui, Lying Chair, Bright Sky (2011). Courtesy Tang Contemporary Art.

Mao Xuhui, Lying Chair, Bright Sky (2011). Courtesy Tang Contemporary Art.

The artist Mao Xuhui turns a rather banal daily object — a chair — into a piece of figurative, and visually monumental work. The shadows created by the chair’s various parts imbue a sculptural quality that is mostly unseen in still life paintings. By positioning the chair at an unexpected angle, on its side, and against an empty sky-like blue background, we are made to see this object of daily use in a new light. 

—Yi Zhang

Bruno Catalano
Margot
Galeries Bartoux
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Bruno Catalanol, Margot. Courtesy of Galeries Bartoux.

Bruno Catalano, Margot. Courtesy of Galeries Bartoux.

Negative space is mostly talked about with regards to painting, but the sculptures of Bruno Catalano are a great example of negative space being used in a three-dimensional capacity. His sculptures of everyday people have large empty areas that have seemingly “disappeared” and are both visually fascinating and structurally remarkable. 

—Tara Wyant

Chuck Elliott
interStella – Quad 1.2
TAG Fine Arts
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Chuck Elliott, interStella - Quad 1.2 (2019), Courtesy of TAG Fine Arts.

Chuck Elliott, interStella – Quad 1.2 (2019), Courtesy of TAG Fine Arts.

Inspired by the work of Frank Stella, this geometric-pattern print riffs on ideas of the changing seasons and plant life through bold and bright colors. The color-saturated work is sure to enliven a winter day. 

—Sara Carson

Ryan Van Der Hout
Distortion
Oeno Gallery
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Ryan Van Der Hout, Distortion (2017). Courtesy of Oeno Gallery.

Ryan Van Der Hout, Distortion (2017). Courtesy of Oeno Gallery.

Ryan Van Der Hout expands his abstract photo-based practice by incorporating laser cut elements onto the print. Here Distortion appears as an ambiguous celestial form. The image shifts in texture with pieces of gold leaf layered in water ripples, together creating a witchy kaleidoscopic tondo.

—Santiago Garcia Cano

Bernardo Siciliano
Tender is the Night (Subway)
Aicon Gallery
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Bernardo Siciliano, Tender is the Night (Subway) (2019). Courtesy of Aicon Gallery.

Bernardo Siciliano, Tender is the Night (Subway) (2019). Courtesy of Aicon Gallery.

This painting by Italian artist Bernardo Siciliano brings to mind late night subway rides on the 6 train. I particularly love his use of one point perspective, which is often seen in drawings of architectural spaces. The subway pole, too, becomes a framing device that seems to divide in the canvas like a diptych, 

—Qadira Farrington

Jiri Valoch
Drawing
Galerie aKonzept
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Jiri Valoch, Drawing (1979). Courtesy of Galerie aKonzept.

Jiri Valoch, Drawing (1979). Courtesy of Galerie aKonzept.

Jiri Valoch is a conceptual artist who is also poet. In this work he plays with the concept of drawing and its relationship to language, painting each letter of the word “drawing” down a white canvas at unexpected intervals, almost as though they were falling down the canvas. 

—Miriam Minak

Jean-Pierre Cassigneul
Rendez-Vous
Daphne Alazraki Fine Art
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Jean-Pierre Cassigneul, Rendez-Vous (2019). Courtesy of Daphne Alazraki Fine Art.

Jean-Pierre Cassigneul, Rendez-Vous (2019). Courtesy of Daphne Alazraki Fine Art.

Now is his 80s, Cassigneul has been well-known for his striking portrayals of fashionable women in striking hats for decades. This painting shows a stylish woman clad in a fabulous fur-trimmed black coat and wide-brimmed hat. I especially enjoy the small details: her empty wine glass and a cigarette resting on a plate next to an untouched apple. The woman casts her focused gaze out beyond the canvas, and we’re left wondering if she’s waiting for someone to arrive.

—Julia Yook

Erwin Wurm
Director (Herrentasche)
Lehmann Maupin
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Erwin Wurm, Director (Herrentasche) (2019). Courtesy Lehmann Maupin.

Erwin Wurm, Director (Herrentasche) (2019). Courtesy Lehmann Maupin.

This Erwin Wurm sculpture titled Director will be one of several exhibited in a solo exhibition for the artist at Lehmann Maupin on view this January. At over 6 feet tall, this all-white bronze pokes fun at the corporate “badge of honor” by reducing the figure to a ridiculously long pair of legs, dress shoes, and a briefcase.

—Cristina Cruz


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