Art Industry News: Thousands Sign Petition Asking King Charles to Return the Crown Jewels to Africa + Other Stories

Plus, Matthew Barney is planning a new epic video installation and a "stock exchange for art" launches at the V&A.

The Crown Jewels, 1953. St Edward's Crown, used to crown English and British monarchs at their coronations since the 13th century, and the Sovereign's Sceptre. Photo by Print Collector/Getty Images.

Art Industry News is a daily digest of the most consequential developments coming out of the art world and art market. Here’s what you need to know on this Friday, May 5.

NEED-TO-READ

Matthew Barney Plans Video Installation About American Football – The artist is set to premiere a new epic video installation, titled Secondary, at his studio in Long Island City on May 12. Barney, who was an athlete himself, said it offers up a description of “the complex overlay of violence and spectacle inherent in American football, and more broadly within American culture.” The work, which includes a material-based choreography, will be installed around a flooded trench in floor of the studio. (ARTnews)  

V&A To Platform a “Stock Exchange for Art” – Artex, a new online organization functioning as a “stock exchange for art” is offering its first initial public offering at the Victoria & Albert Museum at the end of this month, with works available valued at upwards of €50 million ($55.2 million). The Liechtenstein-based company owns all of the artworks, and will issue shares worth €100 ($110) each, which can be bought, sold, or traded on the Artex exchange, and shareholders are limited to a 10 percent stake in each piece. (The Art Newspaper)

Petition Launched for UK to Return Star of Africa – South Africans have called on the U.K. to return the world’s largest diamond, which is set in the royal scepter that will be used at the coronation tomorrow, to Africa. The 530 carat diamond, known as Cullinan I or the Star of Africa, was gifted to the monarchy by the British colonial government in South Africa 1905, after it was discovered there. (Reuters)

Documentary Explores the Art & Life of David Hammons – Harold Crooks’s and journalist Judd Tully’s documentary on the artist, The Melt Goes On Forever is on view now at Film Forum. Critic Wesley Morris notes how the film’s initial “rich interpretive consideration of Hammons’s essence, philosophy and process” including by many Black critics and artists, eventually cedes screen time to the views of moneyed (white) gallerists, collectors and dealers, leading him to read the film itself as conceptual piece, playing on how Hammons’s work is aware of “the stakes for Black people navigating the straits of the market.”  (New York Times)  

MOVERS & SHAKERS

Museum of the City of New York Creates New Curator Role – Angel (Monxo) Santiago-López has becoming the first Latinx permanent curator. The role was funded by a grant from the Leadership in Art Museums coalition of foundations working to diversify leadership roles. (Yahoo)  

Diamond Brooch From Queen’s Coronation Fetches $88,000 – Sotheby’s sold a diamond brooch once owned by the late queen for £69,850 at a coronation-themed auction. The piece was gifted by the queen to one of her coronation maids of honor. (Evening Standard)  

Armory Show Names Participants – More than 225 galleries will descend upon the Javits Center in New York this September for the 2023 edition of the Armory Show, with 140 galleries returning to the fair. Sections will include a “Solo” section for single-artist features; “Presents” for galleries established less than ten years ago; and the curated “Focus” section organized by Candice Hopkins. New York-based No Gallery is the recipient of the Gramercy International Prize, which is a complimentary booth awarded to a local gallery making its debut at the fair. (Artforum)  

FOR ART’S SAKE

New Prints By Patrick Caulfield – Coinciding with an exhibition on Post-war British artist Patrick Caulfield on May 18, Josh Lilley gallery is releasing a new edition of posthumous screen prints entitled The Laforgue Four produced by the Caulfield family to mark the 50th anniversary of a book of poems by Jules Laforgue which Caulfield had illustrated during his lifetime. (Press release) 

Patrick Caulfield, Untitled Laforgue Print 24 - (Broken Window). An edition of 100. Published by Patrick Caulfield Editions. Printed by Make-Ready, 2022.

Patrick Caulfield, Untitled Laforgue Print 24 – (Broken Window). An edition of 100. Published by Patrick Caulfield Editions. Printed by Make-Ready, 2022.

More Trending Stories:  

A British Couple Bought Two Vases for $10 at a Thrift Sale. They Turned Out to Be Art Nouveau Collectibles Worth 150 Times That 

A Museum Has Renamed a Vegetable Still Life by Van Gogh After a Chef Spotted Something Was Off About the Onions 

An X-Ray Scan of a 16th-Century Bronzino Painting of Duke Cosimo de’ Medici Has Revealed a Mysterious Underlying Portrait 

‘He Was Hungry’: A Korean Art Student Untaped Maurizio Cattelan’s Infamous $150,000 Banana From a Museum Wall and Ate It 

Art Industry News: A Rare Blue Diamond Priyanka Chopra Jonas Showed Off at the Met Gala Could Fetch $25 Million at Auction + Other Stories 

A Low-Key Collector Kept 230 Classic Cars Hidden Away in a Dusty Old Church. The Astonishing Trove Could Fetch Millions at Auction 

Christie’s Neglected to Reveal the Ugly History Behind Its Sensational Planned Jewelry Auction. Then a Billionaire’s Wife Complained 

See the Rare Keith Haring Drawing—Measuring a Massive 125 Feet—That Is Going on View in Amsterdam for the First Time in 30 Years 

How Lavinia Fontana Broke Renaissance Tradition to Become the First Woman Artist Known to Depict Female Nudes—and Earn Equal Pay as Men 


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