Artist Creates Huge Melting Wax House–That’s Cool

8
View Slideshow
The house after a few days of meltingPhoto: Tommophoto via Design Boom
0/0
The wax house before the melting beganPhoto: Chris Tubbs via Design Boom
The wax house before the melting began
Photo: Chris Tubbs via Design Boom
The house after a few days of meltingPhoto: Tommophoto via Design Boom
The house after a few days of melting
Photo: Tommophoto via Design Boom
Detail of the melted bricksPhoto: Tommophoto via Design Boom
Detail of the melted bricks
Photo: Tommophoto via Design Boom
Detail of a melted windowPhoto: Chris Tubbs via Design Boom
Detail of a melted window
Photo: Chris Tubbs via Design Boom
The house after a few days of meltingPhoto: Tommophoto via Design Boom
The house after a few days of melting
Photo: Tommophoto via Design Boom
Detail of the melted bricksPhoto: Tommophoto via Design Boom
Detail of the melted bricks
Photo: Tommophoto via Design Boom
The house after a few days of meltingPhoto: Tommophoto via Design Boom
The house after a few days of melting
Photo: Tommophoto via Design Boom
Alex Chinneck’s sketch of the wax house after melting. Via: Design Boom
Alex Chinneck’s sketch of the wax house after melting
Via: Design Boom

The British artist Alex Chinneck has created a two-story house made from wax in the London area of Southwark, as part of the Merge Festival 2014.

Titled A pound of flesh for 50p, the installation was erected at the end of September, mimicking the scale and design of a candle making factory that was based in the same area a few centuries ago.

The installation, a life-sized building constructed with 8,000 wax bricks weighing up to 10 metric tons, is heated each morning with a handheld heating machine commonly used in roofing applications. Thus, the wax house is melting down in hypnotic, slow motion fashion. When the installation concludes on November 18, there won’t be more than a mushy puddle left on the pavement.

The prolific 30-year-old Chinneck has quickly earned a reputation as a master of illusion, an “Uri Geller of bricks and mortar,” as the Guardian called him. Over the past year, Chinneck has dazzled London audiences with his maverick architectural installations, which include flipping buildings upside down, suspending them midair, and letting them slither down on the pavement.

Despite recurring comparisons to conceptual artists with a penchant for architecture such as Rachel Whiteread or Gordon Matta-Clark, Chinneck is not a fan of the over-intellectualization of art. “These pieces are not conceptually driven, or trying to deliver a particular message,” he told the Guardian. “The aim is to astound people and just cheer them up a bit.”

Check the astonishing gradual melting of A pound of flesh for 50p in the slideshow above.


Follow Artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.
Article topics
Subscribe or log in to read the rest of this content.

You are currently logged into this Artnet News Pro account on another device. Please log off from any other devices, and then reload this page continue. To find out if you are eligible for an Artnet News Pro group subscription, please contact [email protected]. Standard subscriptions can be purchased on the subscription page.

Log In