How ‘Amélie’ Star Audrey Tautou Used Photography to Cope With Her Hollywood Fame

The actress plays both subject and artist in an upcoming exhibition in Arles, France.

Audrey Tautou, Untitled, Audrey Tautou. Courtesy of the artist, © Rencontres Arles.
Audrey Tautou, Untitled, Audrey Tautou. Courtesy of the artist, © Rencontres Arles.

Audrey Tautou, French actress and face of Chanel No. 5, is no stranger to having her picture taken—but in a twist, for an upcoming exhibition, she is both the model and artist. “Superfacial,” set to debut later this summer in Arles, France, showcases the actress’s photography over the course of her career in Hollywood. The actress and model rocketed to international celebrity with her Academy Award-nominated role in Amélie, which premiered in 2001. In order to cope with her newfound fame, Tautou turned to photography, often taking snapshots of journalists after press interviews, according to an interview with the New York Times Style Magazine.

The actress showed off her photog skills in a 2009 Chanel No. 5 video.

The actress showed off her photog skills in a 2009 Chanel No. 5 video.

As a child, the actress came across the documentary work of wildlife photographer Dian Fossey, who served as inspiration to take up photography. After achieving fame, Tautou applied similar modes of detached viewing to her practice; she turned the lens on herself in a manner that recalls Cindy Sherman‘s mode of navigating the complexities of female identity by taking on alternative personas. Over the past 15 years, in addition to starring in movies as diverse as The Da Vinci CodeCoco Before Chanel, and A Very Long Engagement, Tautou has also experimented with more private personas, which will be soon be on view to the public.

Audrey Tautou: Superfacial” is on view at the Abbaye de Montmajour in Arles as part of the Rencontres d’Arles festival from July 3–September 24.


Follow artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.

Share

Article topics