Artist Camille Henrot Wins 2015 Edvard Munch Art Award

Henrot will get roughly $60,000 and a solo show at the Munch Museum.

Camille Henrot Photo Courtesy of Kathy Lo.

French artist Camille Henrot is the 2015 recipient of the Edvard Munch Art Award, the Munch Museum has announced. Henrot is the first recipient of the award, which is given to an emerging artist no older than 40 years old who has been found (by an appointed jury that included curator Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev and Yale School of Art dean Robert Storr) to have demonstrated exceptional talent within the last five years. The award consists of a monetary prize of NOK 500,000 (58,823 US Dollars) and a solo exhibition at the Munch Museum.

Henrot, who lives and works in New York, is best known for her videos and animated films combining drawn art, music and cinematic images. In 2013 she created Grosse Fatigue, a significant work the earned her the Silver Lion at the 55th Venice Biennale. Henrot currently is in group shows across the world including one at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and a solo-show at Metro Pictures in New York until December.

The announcement of the recipient was made at Art Basel in Miami Beach on December 4, and the official award ceremony will take place on December 12 at the Munch Museum in Oslo.

artnet News spoke to the award winning artist about her recent win, and what it means to her.

Camille Henrot Installtion view 2015 Metro Pictures, New York Photo Courtesy of Metro Pictures Gallery

Camille Henrot Installtion view 2015 Metro Pictures, New York Photo Courtesy of Metro Pictures Gallery

What was your reaction when you received the news that you won the award?
First I did not understand what it was about. I did not know the award, as it is all new. Then I was very honored and impressed by being chosen by such a prestigious jury. I also appreciate the way the award is organized as a closed nomination. I am very happy to be the first recipient of the award honoring the name of an artist I admire for being very much in touch with the essence of human life.

In addition to the cash award, you are given the opportunity to have a solo show at the museum. What do you envision for that show?
It’s really too early to say. The exhibition will take place in a few years.

How do you think the award will help you in terms of your art practice?  
An award is always an encouragement. And of course the money helps, as it will allow me to dedicate more time to artistic research.

This award is given to an artist who has shown exceptional talent within the past five years. What do you envision for yourself in the next five years?
I don’t know if I deserve this statement, but I am very flattered. It makes me very happy. I will just keep working the same way I am working now.

Do you have any upcoming shows or projects you can speak about?      
I am preparing a show at the Foundation Memmo in 2016 and another very big exhibition which will take place in 2017, which will be announced soon.

Can you talk about your journey as an artist to this point in your career?    
I can’t really answer this question. It’s very complex. If I knew how to answer this question I probably would not keep doing art works. It’s only when I work I understand what I am doing.

What is one piece of advice you would give to an aspiring artist?
I have very pragmatic advice. I would say to read artists biographies and artists writings. And also make sure you have enough free time, as to experience boredom.


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