Editors’ Picks: 10 Things to See in New York This Week

Mark your calendars.

Vera Iliatova, Drift (2016). Courtesy of Tibor de Nagy.
Vera Iliatova, Drift (2016). Courtesy of Tibor de Nagy.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting, and thought-provoking, shows, screenings, and events. See them below.

Monday, April 10–May 26

Mike Bidlo, Fractured Fountain Not Duchamp Fountain 1917) (2015). Courtesy the artist.

Mike Bidlo, Fractured Fountain Not Duchamp Fountain 1917) (2015). Courtesy the artist.

1. “Marcel Duchamp Fountain: An Homage” at Francis M. Naumann Fine Art
One hundred years later, the case of Richard Mutt and his inverted-commode is no less worthy of examination than it was on April 10, 1917. The gallery presents a selection of artists’ personal interpretations, reflections, and nods to the iconic work.

Location: 24 West 57th St, Suite 305.
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Friday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Caroline Goldstein 

Tuesday, April 11–Sunday, July 9

Caravaggio, <i>The Martyrdom of Saint Ursula</i> (1610). Courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Intesa Sanpaolo Collection, Palazzo Zevallos Stigliano, Naples

Caravaggio, The Martyrdom of Saint Ursula (1610). Courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Intesa Sanpaolo Collection, Palazzo Zevallos Stigliano, Naples

2. “Caravaggio’s Last Two Paintings” reunited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
Caravaggio‘s The Martyrdom of Saint Ursula, which is on loan from the Banca Intesa Sanpaolo in Naples, and The Denial of Saint Peter, created in the last months of the artist’s life and now in the Met’s collection, will be reunited for the first time since 2004, when they were part of an exhibition in Naples and London that looked at the artist’s late work.

Location: 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York City
Price: Suggested admission $25
Time: Sunday–Thursday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Friday and Saturday: 10 a.m.–9 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Wednesday, April 12

C. Riley Snorton. Courtesy africana.cornell.edu.

C. Riley Snorton. Courtesy africana.cornell.edu.

3. “In Conversation: C. Riley Snorton: On Public Memory and Political Martyrdom” at the International Center of Photography
C. Riley Snorton, an assistant professor at the Africana Studies and Research Center at Cornell University, will explore the notion of how photographs and archives can erase or make visible both bodies and identities. His work looks at the intersection of archives, #translivesmatter, and #blacklivesmatter.

Location: 250 Bowery, New York City
Price: Free with registration
Time: 6:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

Eileen Kinsella

Thursday, April 13–Saturday, June 10

Dieter Roth, Hat (Hut) (1965). Collection of Matthew Zucker. © Dieter Roth Estate, Courtesy Hauser & Wirth.

Dieter Roth, Hat (Hut) (1965). Collection of Matthew Zucker. © Dieter Roth Estate, Courtesy Hauser & Wirth.

4. “Other Hats: Icelandic Printmaking” at International Print Center New York
The International Print Center New York will present a selection of prints across all media, in a group exhibition of Icelandic artists. The show’s title alludes to both the collaborative spirit of printmaking that fosters a multi-tasking sensibility, and the many theoretical ‘hats’ that Icelandic natives wear in order to support themselves—often working multiple jobs simultaneously.

The selection of works certainly underscores this phenomenon—many of the featured works are by artists known for their other professional endeavors, including a songwriter, novelist, and fashion designer. The show is co-curated by Ingibjörg Jóhannsdóttir, a master printmaker and school headmaster (Reykjavík), and Pari Stave, a museum administrator and freelance curator (New York).

Location: International Print Center New York 508 West 26th Street, 5th floor
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Caroline Goldstein 

Thursday, April 13–Saturday, May 20

Sarah McEneaney, <em>Walsgrove Morning</em> (2016). Courtesy of Tibor de Nagy.

Sarah McEneaney, Walsgrove Morning (2016). Courtesy of Tibor de Nagy.

5. “Sarah McEneaney: Land, Sea, Sleep” and “Vera Iliatova: Drift” at Tibor de Nagy Gallery
Tibor de Nagy opens two shows of women painters this week. In her sixth outing with the gallery, Sarah McEneaney presents acrylic canvases, painted during her travels in the US, China, and Ireland, with her signature diaristic subject matter rendered in intricate and compelling detail. Vera Iliatova, showing here for the first time, displays canvases of flowers and female figures, often depicted from a strange perspective, the flowers dwarfing the women in the paintings to disconcerting effect.

Location: Tibor de Nagy Gallery, 724 Fifth Avenue
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

Sarah Cascone

Thursday, April 13–Sunday, July 16

Else Bostelmann, <em>Chiasmodon niger Stomach Contents</em>, Bermuda (1931). Courtesy of the Drawing Center, © Wildlife Conservation Society.

Else Bostelmann,
Chiasmodon niger Stomach Contents, Bermuda (1931). Courtesy of the Drawing Center, © Wildlife Conservation Society.

6. “Exploratory Works: Drawings from the Department of Tropical Research Field Expeditions” at the Drawing Center
The Drawing Center presents over 60 historical drawings created during the Department of Tropical Research’s (DTR) field expeditions to South America and the Caribbean in the early 20th century. Artists Else Bostelmann and Isabel Cooper, whose work is featured in the show, were among the first women artists to take part in such trips—DTR’s William Beebe was also among the first to hire women as lead scientists and historians.

In addition to highlighting the important scientific and artistic contributions of women at the DTR, and the overall importance of art to scientific exhibitions, the exhibition will feature installations by Mark Dion inspired by historical images of a DTR jungle field station and oceanographic workshop.

Location: The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Wednesday, Friday–Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.; Thursday, 12 p.m.–8 p.m.

Sarah Cascone

Through Friday, April 14, 2017

<em>THE TYRANNY OF COMMON SENSE HAS REACHED ITS FINAL STAGE<em/>. Installations day with curators Tomas Vu and Rirkrit Tiravanija. Courtesy of the LeRoy Neiman Gallery.

THE TYRANNY OF COMMON SENSE HAS REACHED ITS FINAL STAGE. Installations day with curators Tomas Vu and Rirkrit Tiravanija. Courtesy of the LeRoy Neiman Gallery.

7. “THE TYRANNY OF COMMON SENSE HAS REACHED ITS FINAL STAGE” at the LeRoy Neiman Gallery, Columbia University
Students and alumni of Columbia University were asked to submit their Resistance T-shirt designs in a sharp, moving, and even satirical installation organized by Tomas Vu and Rirkrit Tiravanija. The title of this exhibition is derived from Tiravanija’s most recent body of work, following last year’s presidential election. The two artists have worked together to curate exhibitions as a part of the “Up Against the Wall Mother F*****” series since 2011, inviting artists to work directly on the walls of the LeRoy Neiman Gallery. “THE TYRANNY OF COMMON SENSE HAS REACHED ITS FINAL STAGE” is timely and sort of cathartic, something that is especially interesting to see in this institutional context.

Location: LeRoy Neiman Gallery, Columbia University, 310 Dodge Hall, MC 1806, 2960 Broadway
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.

Kiki Olmedo

Through Sunday, April 16

Sara Erenthal, <em>Locked Out</em>, detail). Courtesy of Sara Erenthal.

Sara Erenthal, Locked Out, detail). Courtesy of Sara Erenthal.

8. “Moving On: New Paintings by Sara Erenthal” at the FiveMyles
Sara Erenthal, one of the artists taking over New York phone booths with “Resistance Is Female” guerrilla art, can also be encountered in a more institutional setting, at Brooklyn’s FiveMyles. The exhibition functions somewhat as a memoir through art, with paintings that tell the story of Erenthal’s life, from a childhood spent in an ultra-orthodox Jewish community, to military service in Israel after running away from home at 17 rather than entering into arranged marriage, to her pursuit of a career in art.

Location: The Plus/Space, FiveMyles, 558 St. Johns Place, Crown Heights, Brooklyn
Price: Free
Time: Thursday–Sunday, 1 p.m.–6 p.m.

Sarah Cascone

Through Friday, April 28

Krista Kim, <em>No. 1008 v.3<em/> (2016). Courtesy of Dean Borghi Fine Art.

Krista Kim, No. 1008 v.3 (2016). Courtesy of Dean Borghi Fine Art.

9. “Krista Kim: Digital Consciousness” at Dean Borghi Fine Art
Canadian artist Krista Kim turns abstract expressionism on its head by embracing the new possibilities technology has made available. Her current show presents work where the raw material is images of LED lights. Though this would seem a very technical work mode, the end result are painterly pieces that evoke meditation and a very visceral reaction from its spectator.

Location: Dean Borghi Fine Art, 529 West 20th Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Kiki Olmedo

Through Monday, September 25, 2017

Ian Cheng, Emissary Forks at Perfection. (2015–16). Courtesy Fund for the Twenty-First Century.

10. “Ian Cheng: EMISSARIES” at MoMA PS1
MoMa PS1 is hosting its Spring Open House this Sunday, April 16, from noon to 6 p.m., and will feature all new exhibitions including “Past Skin,” “Tomáš Rafa: “New Nationalisms,” and an immersive experience of work by Ian Cheng, the artist’s first solo presentation in a US museum. “EMISSARIES” includes the artist’s complete Emissary trilogy, a series of live simulation works that use predictive and video game technology to tackle weighty questions, like the nature of human consciousness, chaos, and evolution. Each self-contained ecosystem will be projected at 10 feet tall, and fill the entire gallery; the viewer can observe the stories and characters of Cheng’s ever-evolving worlds.

Location: MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Ave, Long Island City
Price: General admission $10
Time: Thursday–Monday,12–6 p.m.

Sarbani Ghosh


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