Editors’ Picks: 12 Things Not to Miss in New York’s Art World This Week

Old Master works are cropping up in galleries all over the city, plus an homage to Wu-Tang Clan at The Kitchen.

Cao Yi, Window No. 5 (2016). Courtesy of the artist and Chambers Fine Art.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. See them below.

 

Tuesday, January 22

Cecilia Vicuña, <em>Resister</em> (1975). Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul.

Cecilia Vicuña, Resister (1975). Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul.

1. “The Political Act of Art-Making as a Woman: Judith Bernstein, Betty Tompkins, Susan Unterberg, and Cecilia Vicuña” at Lehmann Maupin

Last year, artist Susan Unterberg revealed that she was the founder and funder of the Anonymous Was a Woman awards, which have given out nearly $6 million in unrestricted grants to women artists over the age of 40. She’ll join fellow artists Judith Bernstein, Betty Tompkins, and Cecilia Vicuña in a panel discussion with Anna Stothart, curatorial director at Lehmann Maupin, about what it means to make art as a woman, followed by a reception.

Location: Lehmann Maupin, 501 West 24th Street
Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 6:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Tuesday, January 22–Saturday, February 16

Adam McEwen, Chest Freezer Tragedy (2019). Courtesy of the artist and Petzel Gallery.

2. “Adam McEwen” at Petzel Gallery

Adam McEwen is kicking off a New York moment with a show of new works at Petzel’s Upper East Side gallery, which will run concurrent with a show at Park Avenue’s Lever House, opening at the end of the month. In his new works, McEwen extends his sculptural studies of everyday objects further, affixing them to plywood and coated with an image of the object his sculpture is meant to resemble. With this added degree of depiction, described in the press release as “graphite doppelgangers,” the artist is challenging our mediated viewing processes in a physical way.

Location: Petzel Gallery, 35 East 67th Street, third floor
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Tuesday, January 22–Sunday, March 10

Andy Warhol, <em>Self Portrait</em> (1986). Paul Kasmin collection. Courtesy the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS).

Andy Warhol, Self Portrait (1986). Paul Kasmin collection. Courtesy the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS).

3. “Andy Warhol: By Hand, Drawings 1950s–1980s” at the New York Academy of Art

The New York Academy of Art pays homage to its founder, Andy Warhol, with an exhibition of 150 drawings—many never-before-seen—by the Pop art great from the private collections of dealers Daniel Blau, Paul Kasmin, and Anton Kern. Vincent Fremont, who ran Warhol’s famous studio, the Factory, has curated the show with current academy president David Kratz.

Location: The New York Academy of Art, 111 Franklin Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, January 24–Saturday, March 10

Sebastian ErraZuriz. Photo courtesy of R & Company.

Sebastian ErraZuriz. Photo courtesy of R & Company.

4. “Sebastian ErraZuriz: Breaking the Box” at R & Company

For his first show with R & Company, Chilean artist Sebastian ErraZuriz has created a monumental three-story sculpture that will hang in the gallery’s 40-foot-tall atrium. Titled Bird Chandelier, it features a hundred vibrant taxidermy birds in a crystal cage. The show will also include new works from his Mechanical Cabinet series, modular marvels of woodworking that rotate and spin in surprising ways.

Location: R & Company, 64 White Street
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Friday,11 a.m.–6 p.m.; Saturday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, January 24–Saturday, March 16

Georg Baselitz’s Der Brückechor (The Brücke Chorus) (1983). © Georg Baselitz. Image courtesy of 2014 Christie’s Images Ltd.

5. “Georg Baselitz: Devotion” at Gagosian

The neo-expressionist German artist Georg Baselitz is showing a new series of paintings and works on paper. Although he’s created portraits before, Baselitz says in the press release, “I call this exhibition ‘Devotion’ because the people I portray here are especially meaningful to me.” In this new series, he takes other artists’ self-portraits as a starting point and interprets them in his own way.

Location: Gagosian, 555 West 24th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Thursday, January 24–Saturday, March 2

Zhao Zhao, Rain (2012). Image courtesy of the artist and Chambers Fine Art.

Zhao Zhao, Rain (2012). Image courtesy of the artist and Chambers Fine Art.

6. “Adrift: Cao Yi, Li Qing, Yi Xin Tong, Zhao Zhao” at Chambers Fine Art

The exhibition examines the current urban landscape of China through the eyes of four young artists who have witnessed its immense transformation, with mega-cities that were unimaginable just a few decades ago. Instead of directly referencing the urban transformation in their work, these artists concentrate on personal experiences from their childhood, providing a set of viewpoints unique to their generation.

Location: Chambers Fine Art, 522 West 19th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

Thursday, January 24–Saturday, March 2

Rasmus Nilausen, i is for idiolect (2018). Courtesy of the artist and Team Gallery.

7. “Rasmus Nilausen: Eye Dialect” at Team Gallery Inc.

In the Danish-born, Barcelona-based artist Rasmus Nilausen’s first show in the US, at New York’s Team Gallery, he combines wit and playful imagery in new paintings that pay homage to philosophical texts and conceptual artists who came before him. His works broach the gulf between the visual representation of a number or symbol and the meaning we derive from its use, in the manner of Robert Morris’s I Box (1962).

Location: Team Gallery Inc., 83 Grand Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Thursday, January 24–Saturday, February 23

Set photograph from Josephine Meckseper's <i>PELLEA[S]</i>. Photo by David Belisle, courtesy of the artist Timothy Taylor Gallery.

Set photograph from Josephine Meckseper’s PELLEA[S]. Photo by David Belisle, courtesy of the artist Timothy Taylor Gallery.

8. “Josephine Meckseper: Scene VI” at Timothy Taylor Gallery

The gallery is presenting an installation of one of the sets from the artist’s film PELLEA[S], an adaptation of Maurice Maeterlinck’s play Pelléas et Mélisande (1892). Adapted for the current sociopolitical landscape, Meckseper’s film weaves together fictional scenarios and dramatic footage that she captured at the 2018 presidential inauguration of Donald Trump, and at the Women’s March that followed—a doomed love triangle that provides the backdrop for both our current political realities and the film. On January 29, The Kitchen, which is directly across the street, will present a screening of PELLEA[S].

Location: Timothy Taylor Gallery, 515 West 19th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Thursday, January 24–Saturday, February 23

Brenda Goodman, Impending (2018). Courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

9. “Brenda Goodman: In a Lighter Place” at Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

The Detroit-born artist Brenda Goodman has embarked on a new method of painting, one that she describes as “akin to the improvisations of jazz” and is informed by intuition accumulated over 50 years of making art. Goodman was a member of the Cass Corridor Movement, the group of artists from the eponymous neighborhood in Detroit whose work was characterized by the post-industrial decline sweeping the country (and especially Motor City). As one of the few women associated with the movement, Goodman’s work is especially notable.

Location: Sikkema Jenkins & Co., 530 West 22nd Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Friday, January 25–Saturday, February 2

Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo, <i>Venus in the Forge of Vulcan</i>, 1777. Image courtesy of Mark Brady.

Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo, Venus in the Forge of Vulcan (1777). Image courtesy of Mark Brady.

10. “Master Drawings New York 2019” 

An annual drawings extravaganza returns this Friday, boasting top-quality works on paper from the Old Masters era to today. Presented by a rich array of American and European dealers with differing areas of expertise, the event brings together more than 30 superb exhibitions to remind us that virtuosity doesn’t always have to be monumental.

Locations: Various Upper East Side venues: see the map here.
Price: Free
Time: Friday, January 25, 4 p.m.–8 p.m.; Saturday, January 26, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sunday, January 27, 2 p.m.–6 p.m.; Remaining days, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Tim Schneider

 

Saturday, January 26

Devin Kenny performing for Revenge Body Politics at the Goethe Institut, New York (2018). Photo: Aaron Rhodan.

11. “Sable Elyse Smith: C.R.E.A.M” at the Kitchen

This Saturday at the Kitchen, artist Sable Elyse Smith has invited a group of multidisciplinary artists for a live event inspired by Wu-Tang Clan’s seminal 1993 song “C.R.E.A.M (Cash Rules Everything Around Me).” The event extends Smith’s interest in the song and the cultural moment it represents, which is also the subject of her sculpture of the same name, on view at the High Line through March. The evening will include performances by Jibade-Khalil Huffman and Simone White, music by Devin Kenny, and readings by Smith and A.H. Jerriod Avant.

Location: The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street
Price: Free
Time: 4 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Through Thursday, January 31

Installation view of “Alexander Archipenko: Space Encircled” at Eykyn Maclean.

12. “Alexander Archipenko: Space Encircled” at Eykyn Maclean

Eykyn Maclean’s show featuring the work of Ukrainian sculptor Alexander Archipenko has been extended through the end of January. The show was conceived by and curated in collaboration with Matthew Stephenson, the worldwide representative of the Archipenko Foundation and Estate. It includes terracotta sculptures, works on paper, bronzes, and sculpto-paintings, and focuses on the artist’s use of negative space, which he poetically dubbed “space encircled.”

Location: Eykyn Maclean, 23 East 67th Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein


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