Editors’ Picks: 14 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From Tarot Reading for Artists to Lucy Lippard on Central American Solidarity

Plus the great Nepalese Modernist Lain Singh Bangdel gets his first U.S. solo museum show.

Louis Vuitton and Nike “Air Force 1” sneakers and pilot case by Virgil Abloh. Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.
Louis Vuitton and Nike “Air Force 1” sneakers and pilot case by Virgil Abloh. Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.

Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events, both digitally and in-person in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all ET unless otherwise noted.)

 

Tuesday, January 25

From left: Amy Cappellazzo, Jade Mitchell, Dexter Wimberly, Julia Henderson.

From left: Amy Cappellazzo, Jade Mitchell, Dexter Wimberly, Julia Henderson

1. “Artnet Talks” with Art Market Mentors

Yes, we’re shamelessly plugging our own event—for the second year Artnet News is teaming up with Art Market Mentors to present a conversation with seasoned art market denizens Amy Cappellazzo, Jade Mitchell, Dexter Wimberly, and Julia Henderson, moderated by Catherine Manson. The free talk will take place on Zoom (what doesn’t these days?) and the panel will see them discuss their career paths. Stick around for an audience Q&A afterward.

Price: Free
Time: Tuesday, January 25th at 12:00 p.m. EST / 5:00 p.m. GMT

—Artnet News

 

Wednesday, January 26

Courtesy of Louis Vuitton.

2. “Louis Vuitton and Nike ‘Air Force 1’ by Virgil Abloh at Sotheby’s New York

To launch the Louis Vuitton Spring Summer 2022 Men’s Collection, Sotheby’s is set to auction off 200 special-edition pairs of Louis Vuitton and Nike “Air Force 1” sneakers designed by Virgil Abloh, who passed away in November. This was the polymath designer’s first-ever collaboration with Nike on the iconic sneaker style, which turns 40 this year. Designed from calf leather with LV Monogram and Damier patterns, natural cowhide piping, and Abloh’s signature quotation marks, and packaged exclusively in a Monogram taurillon-leather pilot case featuring a luggage tag shaped like a Nike Swoosh, each pair perfectly encapsulates Abloh’s high-style, street-wise aesthetic, and is available at a starting bid of $2,000. Proceeds will benefit the Virgil Abloh™ “Post-Modern” Scholarship Fund, which works with the Fashion Scholarship Fund to support the educations of academically promising Black students.

Location: Online, with a simultaneous exhibition at Sotheby’s, 1334 York Avenue, New York
Price: Free
Time: Daily at all times, from 9 a.m. Wednesday

—Christine Ajudua

 

Courtesy of Rizzoli.

Courtesy of Rizzoli.

3. “Takedown: Art and Power in the Digital Age” at Rizzoli Bookstore, New York

Writers Farah Nayeri and Linda Yablonsky will be discussing the issues of censorship, inequality, and dirty money in the art world at this virtual even, celebrating the launch of Nayeri’s new book “Takedown: Art and Power in the Digital Age” (Astra House). Researched and written during the pandemic, the book surveys the clash between politics and art from pre-Renaissance to the present day with historical documents as well as interviews with artists, curators, and museum directors.

Price: $10
Time: 6 p.m.–8 p.m. EST

—Katya Kazakina

 

Cosmic Geometries curators Sharmistha Ray and Dannielle Tegeder divining the installation of the exhibition under the guidance of tarot reader and witch Sarah Potter. Photo courtesy of the EFA Project Space, New York.

Cosmic Geometries curators Sharmistha Ray and Dannielle Tegeder divining the installation of the exhibition under the guidance of tarot reader and witch Sarah Potter. Photo courtesy of the EFA Project Space, New York.

4. “Going Beyond Tradition: Tarot Basics for Artists and Creatives” at EFA Project Space, New York

Hilma’s Ghost, a feminist artist collective founded by Brooklyn artists Dannielle Tegeder and Sharmistha Ray in 2020, debuted their spiritually inspired work, which channels the great Hilma af Klint, at last year’s Armory Show in New York. Now, the duo has curated at group show, “Cosmic Geometries” (through February 26), featuring abstract and geometric works with a transcendental bent. Sarah Potter, a curator, tarot card reader, and witch who helped them divine how to hang the show, is holding a tarot reading workshop about how to use the deck the duo created featuring the pantings from their “Abstract Futures Tarot” series. The virtual workshop is BYOT—bring your own tarot, with limited copies for sale in person at the EFA Project Space.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 3 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, January 27

Lucy Lippard. Photo by R.A. Shuff, courtesy of Tufts University, Boston.

Lucy Lippard. Photo by R.A. Shuff, courtesy of Tufts University, Boston.

5. “Re-calling Artists Call” at Tufts University Art Galleries, Boston

Art critic Lucy Lippard gives a key-note address at the virtual opening celebration for Tufts’s “Art for the Future: Artists Call and Central American Solidarities” (through April 24), about the 1980s activist campaign Artists Call Against US Intervention in Central America. Lippard, who helped organize the show, will speak about her role in the movement with exhibition curators Erina Duganne and Abigail Satinsky and curatorial fellow Geovani Cruz.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 6  p.m.–8 p.m.

—Tanner West

 

Thursday, January 27–April 9

Lain Singh Bangdel, <em>Moon Over Kathmandu</em> (1962). Collection of Mervin Stevens. Photo courtesy of the Yeh Art Gallery, St. John’s University, New York.

Lain Singh Bangdel, Moon Over Kathmandu (1962).
Collection of Mervin Stevens. Photo courtesy of the Yeh Art Gallery, St. John’s University, New York.

6. “Lain Singh Bangdel: Moon over Kathmandu” at Yeh Art Gallery, St. John’s University, Queens

Lain Singh Bangdel (1919–2002), Nepal’s leading Modern art figure, gets his first solo museum exhibition in the U.S., and first posthumous solo exhibition outside Nepal. Also a successful novelist, academic, and art historian, Bangdel was born to Nepali migrant workers on a tea plantation in Darjeeling, India, and made his first trip home to Nepal in 1961, in response to a formal request from King Mahendra. The 20 works on view at the Yeh Art Gallery illustrate how Bangdel used his abstract painting to help create a visual language for modern Nepal, drawing on the imagery of Himalayas and South Asian architecture.

Location: Yeh Art Gallery, St. John’s University, Queens
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.;Saturday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, January 28

Diego Rivera, <em>Agrarian Leader Zapata</em> (1931). Collection of the Museum of Modern Art.

Diego Rivera, Agrarian Leader Zapata (1931). Collection of the Museum of Modern Art.

7. “Mexican Muralism and Its American Impact” at the American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York

A partner event for Master Drawings New York (through January 29), this panel discussion from the West Harlem Art Fund and New York’s Hispanic Society Museum and Library examines the Mexican Muralism movement, and how it was influenced both by European art traditions and political events including war and the rise of communism and socialism. West Harlem Art Fund director and curator Savona Bailey-McClain will moderate the conversation with panelists Esther Adler, associate curator at New York’s Museum of Modern Art; Orlando Hernández-Ying, a curatorial research fellow at the Hispanic Society; and New York gallerist Leon Tovar.

Location: The American Academy of Arts and Letters, 633 West 155th Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: 10 a.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, January 28–Monday, May 2

Harry Callahan, <em>Collages</em> (ca. 1957). International Center of Photography, Gift of Louis F. Fox, 1980 (76.1980) © The Estate of Harry Callahan, courtesy Pace Gallery.

Harry Callahan, Collages (ca. 1957). International Center of Photography, Gift of Louis F. Fox, 1980 (76.1980) © The Estate of Harry Callahan, courtesy Pace Gallery.

8. “A Trillion Sunsets: A Century of Image Overload” at the International Center of Photography

The show explores mass media excess and image over-saturation through more than 50 works from the 1920s to today. As far back as the 1920s, with the explosion of illustrated magazines and newspapers, commentators asked whether society could survive the visual inundation. Artists looked to mass-media imagery and archives of all kinds to rethink the world around them.

The material on display includes picture scrapbooks, internet memes, works rooted in collage and appropriation, and art made by algorithms. It features images from ICP’s own collection, including works by Nakeya Brown, Robert Capa, Walker Evans, Hannah Höch, Justine Kurland, Louise Lawler, Barbara Morgan, Richard Prince, Sara Greenberger Rafferty, Hank Willis Thomas, Andy Warhol, and Carrie Mae Weems.

Location: International Center of Photography, 79 Essex Street, New York
Price: General admission $16
Time: Monday, Wednesday, Friday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m.–9 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Friday, January 28–Saturday, March 5

Luca Buvoli, Thank You for the Spotlight, Daily Heller! (2021) (from Astrodoubt and the Quarantine Chronicles), 2021. Image courtesy Cristin Tierney Gallery.

Luca Buvoli, Thank You for the Spotlight, Daily Heller! (2021) (from Astrodoubt and the Quarantine Chronicles), 2021. Image courtesy Cristin Tierney Gallery.

9. “Luca Buvoli: Astrodoubt and the Quarantine Chronicles” at Cristin Tierney Gallery, New York

The show, which marks Buvoli’s first project with the gallery, and his first solo show in New York in 13 years, takes aim at the hopes and fears that permeate our lives. It’s based on a conceptual graphic novel posted on the artist’s Instagram feed near the start of the Covid-19 related shutdown. The show explores the challenges of navigating daily life in a pandemic-stricken world.

Guest curator John G. Hanhardt was reintroduced to the work in the last year as Buvoli, who recently battled cancer, cultivated a virtual audience in isolation, sharing video works and images online daily on his social media feed. Hanhardt, an independent film scholar based in New York,  said preparing the show was like putting together a conceptual jigsaw puzzle of pieces that revealed the artist’s understanding of the traditions of drawing.

Location: Cristin Tierney Gallery 219 Bowery, 2nd floor, New York
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception Friday, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Through Saturday, January 29

"Sanitation Celebration" at the Art Gallery at Pace University, New York. Photo courtesy of the Art Gallery at Pace University, New York.

“Sanitation Celebration” at the Art Gallery at Pace University, New York. Photo courtesy of the Art Gallery at Pace University, New York.

10. “Sanitation Celebration” at the Art Gallery at Pace University, New York

New York City Department of Sanitation employees take center stage in this exhibition celebrating the artistic talents of the municipal workers who do the dirty work of keeping our city clean and running—they pick up 12,000 pounds of refuse on a daily basis. In addition work pieces by 21 department employees, the show also features work by long-time Sanitation Department artists-in-residence Mierle Laderman Ukeles and selections from the 40,000-piece “Treasures in the Trash” collection of objects discarded by New Yorkers amassed by retired DSNY worker Nelson Molina over the course of his 34-year career. The show is curated by Maggie Lee, director of cultural and education programs at the Sanitation Foundation, the department’s official nonprofit; Sarah Cunningham, the art gallery’s director and a Pace assistant clinical professor; and sTo Len, DSNY’s new public artist-in-residence.

Location: Art Gallery at Pace University, 41 Park Row, 1st floor, Spruce Street entrance, New York
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 12 p.m.–4 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Saturday, January 29

An-My Lê, Fragment I: Sugar Cane Field, November 5, Houma, Louisiana from the series "Silent General" (2016). Collection Milwaukee Art Museum, Purchase, Herzfeld Foundation Acquisition Fund. Photo courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery, ©An-My Lê.

An-My Lê, Fragment I: Sugar Cane Field, November 5, Houma, Louisiana from the series “Silent General” (2016). Collection Milwaukee Art Museum, Purchase, Herzfeld Foundation Acquisition Fund. Photo courtesy of Marian Goodman Gallery, ©An-My Lê.

11. “Patricia Nguyen on ‘An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain‘” at the Milwaukee Art Museum

Inspired by the current exhibition “An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain” (through March 27), artist and scholar Patricia Nguyen will stage a virtual performance about forced migration, nation building, carceral states, war, and freedom.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 3 p.m.–5 p.m.

—Nan Stewert

 

Through Saturday, February 19

Installation view of "Carrie Mae Weems: Down Here Below" at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. Photo courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

Installation view of “Carrie Mae Weems: Down Here Below” at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York. Photo courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

12. “Carrie Mae Weems: `Down Here Below” at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

For Carrie Mae Weems’s fourth solo show with Jack Shainman, the artist presents large-scale installations that span some 20 years of her career. The 15 large-format Polaroids of And 22 Million Very Tired and Very Angry People (1990–91) are being shown in New York for the first time since debuting at the New Museum in 1991, while more recent works include The Push, The Call, The Scream, The Dream (2020), a photography series inspired by the death of civil rights activist and United States Representative John Lewis.

Location: Jack Shainman Gallery, 513 West 20th Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: Thursday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, February 26

Installation view "Mark Ryan Chariker: All the Time in the World" 2022. Courtesy of 1969 Gallery.

Installation view “Mark Ryan Chariker: All the Time in the World” 2022. Courtesy of 1969 Gallery.

13. “Mark Ryan Chariker: All the Time in the World” at 1969 Gallery, New  York

Mark Ryan Chariker’s second exhibition with 1969 Gallery is in many ways a response to his first, “Limbo” which opened in March of 2020. That first exhibition—and its title—took on strange new significance as the world went into lockdown. The artist himself was caught up in those fluctuations and found himself displaced from the city for a year. Returning in 2021, he set out to create all of the eleven paintings on view in this exhibition. As with his earlier works, Chariker presents figures seemingly lost in spaces of contemplation, but here the amorphous voids surrounding his subjects have come into focus with vast and beautiful landscapes rolling out around them. One thing is clear: Chariker knows his art history, with small gestures call to mind references as disparate as the Renaissance and the Pre-Raphaelites. His figures, though situated in natural splendor, appear caught between worlds of waking and dreaming, bound by intoxication or spell, like Narcissus or Sleeping Beauty, while here and there, solitary figures appear to break out of this transfixion. Time, as we perceive it, has shifted, he seems to say, and with it our ability to move. 

Location: 1969 Gallery, 39 White Street, New York
Price: Free
Time:  Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. 

—Katie White

 

Installation view of "Brian Rochefort: 5 4 3 2 1" at Van Doren Waxter, New York. Photo courtesy of Van Doren Waxter, New York.

Installation view of “Brian Rochefort: 5 4 3 2 1” at Van Doren Waxter, New York. Photo courtesy of Van Doren Waxter, New York.

14. “Brian Rochefort: 5 4 3 2 1” at Van Doren Waxter, New York

In his third solo exhibition with Van Doren Waxter, Los Angeles ceramics artist Brian Rochefort has created a series of hand-sculpted “paint cans” that appear delightfully tactile, the layers of glaze and crackled slip oozing like molten lava as they bubble over the lip of each vessel and drip down the sides with free-flowing abandon. There are six sets, each in different color palettes, of 35 pots, displayed in rows of five on different wall-mounted shelving units, each painted on the outside in vibrant tones. Larger-scale individual sculptures, each incredibly detailed, offer a more wild take on the smooth surfaces of Ken Price ceramic, and are displayed on pedestals and arrayed on a large table in the center of the last gallery.

Location: Van Doren Waxter, 23 East 73rd Street, 2nd Floor, New York
Price: Free
Time: Thursday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone


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