Editors’ Picks: 21 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From Aspen’s Online Fair to a How-to for Remote Art-Job Hunters

As New York emerges from lockdown, Storm King is opening to the public this week.

Wong Ping, The Other Side, (2015) (still). Courtesy the artist, Edouard Malingue Gallery, Hong Kong / Shanghai and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles.
Wong Ping, The Other Side, (2015) (still). Courtesy the artist, Edouard Malingue Gallery, Hong Kong / Shanghai and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Monday, July 13

"Esther

1. “Esther Choi on Le Corbuffet” at the Glass House, New Canaan, Connecticut

The grounds of the Glass House have been open to the public with limited hours the past few weeks, but the museum is still staging engaging online programming, such as this Zoom talk with artist Esther Choi about her James Beard-nominated cookbook, Le Corbuffet: Edible Art and Design Classics. Inspired by an elaborate dinner menu László Moholy-Nagy created in tribute to Walter Gropius that Choi discovered during her doctorate research, the book features edible adaptations of the work of artists and architects. A few of the unique recipes that Choi created and photographed are Quiche Haring, Frida Kale-o Salad, Robert Rauschenburger, and Flan Flavin.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Monday, July 13–Friday, August 14

Guadalupe Maravilla, Disease Thrower #4, Courtesy of P.P.O.W. Gallery

2. “Noplace” at P.P.O.W.

P.P.O.W. opens a group show of works by Joel Dean, Raque Ford, Ficus Interfaith, Guadalupe Maravilla, and Devin N. Morris. Curated by Eden Deering, the exhibition “brings together artists whose practices connect in their collective utopian pursuit… while simultaneously communicating alternative ways to exist in this world.” Maravilla’s part-shrine, part-instrument Disease Thrower #4 is made from anatomical models, conch shells, and gongs collected from sites across Central America. Be sure to make an appointment during the artist’s weekly “sound bath” performances in the gallery—and don’t forget to bring a mask!

Location: P.P.O.W., 525 West 22nd Street
Price: Free
Time: Appointments encouraged, Monday–Friday, 12 p.m.–5 p.m.

—Cristina Cruz

 

Tuesday, July 14 

Sarah Murket, founder of the art recruiting agency Murk & Co. Courtesy of Art World Conference.

Sarah Murkett, founder of the art recruiting agency Murk & Co. Courtesy of Art World Conference.

3. “Job Searching in the Time of COVID-19” at the Art World Conference

The past months have upended life as we know it, with many experiencing job loss or insecurity. How do those looking for work get back out there—while staying indoors? In this talk hosted by the Art World Conference, Sarah Murkett, founder of the art recruiting agency Murk & Co, will guide participants through the nuts and bolts of the job search at this unusual time, and also offer insights into how to stand apart from the field, video interview prep, negotiating salary, and trends for the future.

Time: 6 p.m.–7:30 p.m. 
Price: Free

—Katie White

 

A mural by Tenbeete Solomon, also known as Trap Bob. Photo courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

A mural by Tenbeete Solomon, also known as Trap Bob. Photo courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

4. “BMA x NMWA: Art in Protest” at the Baltimore Museum of Art and the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC

The National Museum of Women in the Arts and the Baltimore Museum of Art are kicking off a new monthly talk show focusing on women artists with a conversation about art as an act of protest. Tenbeete Solomon, better known as muralist Trap Bob, and artist Quest Skinner will be the inaugural guests.

Price: Free
Time: 12 p.m.–12:45 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Image courtesy Artland and Untitled Art Fair.

Image courtesy of Artland and Untitled Art Fair.

5. “Launching the Art Fair of the Future: A Conversation with Jeff Lawson and Mattis Curth” at UNTITLED Art Fair

Ahead of the launch of UNTITLED’s first online edition (July 31–August 2), art critic and writer Brian Boucher will moderate a chat between fair founder Jeff Lawson and Artland cofounder Mattis Curth about the technological challenges of migrating to the digital space. In a welcome touch, the talk is being simultaneously hosted on Zoom and live-streamed on Facebook.

Price: Free
Time: 2 p.m.–3 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, July 15

Installtion view of virtual exhibition "Kazuo Shiraga: Tales of the Water Margin" at Fergus McCaffrey. Image courtesy of Fergus McCaffrey Gallery.

Installation view of virtual exhibition “Kazuo Shiraga: Tales of the Water Margin” at Fergus McCaffrey. Image courtesy of Fergus McCaffrey Gallery.

6. Virtual Walkthrough of “Kazuo Shiraga: Tales of the Water Margin” at Fergus McCaffrey, New York

Veteran curator Paul Schimmel and advisor Allan Schwartzman lead a walkthrough of 27 large-scale Kazuo Shiraga masterworks on loan from Japanese and American museum collections, titled after the Chinese literary classic, Tales of the Water Margin. The exhibition examines Shiraga’s life-long love of Chinese culture through some of his most iconic foot-paintings.

Price: Free with Zoom registration
Time: 12 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Tempestt Hazel. Photo courtesy of the Art Funders Forum.

Tempestt Hazel. Photo courtesy of the Art Funders Forum.

7. “Remake the Model: Building a Solidarity Economy for the Arts” at the Arts Funders Forum

Curator and writer Tempestt Hazel, the arts program officer of the Field Foundation of Illinois has organized the latest “Remake the Model” talk for the Arts Funders Forum. Angie Kim of the Center for Cultural Innovation, Hoda Katebi of Blue Tin Production Cooperative, and Eric Williams of the Silver Room will speak with moderators Sean McManus and Melissa Cowley Wolf of the Arts Funders Forum about how to improve equity, equality, and solidarity in the arts sector.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 1 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Peter Hujar, Jay and Fernando (Two Men in Leather Kissing), (ca. 1966. © The Peter Hujar Archive.

Peter Hujar, Jay and Fernando (Two Men in Leather Kissing), circa 1966. Photo ©the Peter Hujar Archive.

8. Cruising Utopia: A Conversation on Peter Hujar at Pace

Artists Nayland Blake, Every Ocean Hughes, and Paul Mpagi Sepuya; art historian Abigail Solomon-Godeau; Stephen Koch, director of the Peter Hujar Archive, will convene over Zoom for a mid-day conversation on the life and work of the late photographer Peter Hujar. The panel, moderated by Pace curatorial director Oliver Shultz, coincides with the gallery’s virtual exhibition of Hujar’s depictions of New York gay life between the late 1960s and early 1980s—that brief utopic time after Stonewall and before the onset of the AIDS crisis.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 1 p.m.

—Taylor Dafoe

 

Rachel Rose, <em>Lake Valley</em> (2016), still. Courtesy of Pilar Corrias Gallery, London and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York/Rome.

Rachel Rose, Lake Valley (2016), still. Courtesy of Pilar Corrias Gallery, London and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York/Rome.

9. “Rachel Rose’s Lake Valley: Online Family Friendly Drawing Workshop” at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

Artist Joke Slagle, a faculty member at Penn State University, will teach a workshop inspired by Rachel Rose’s Lake Valley, an eight-minute animated video created from thousands of hand-drawn images. If you ever wanted to learn how to make a flip book, this is your chance.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 1 p.m.–2 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Demonstrators protest on the National Mall in Washington, DC, for the Women's March on January 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images.

Demonstrators protest on the National Mall in Washington, DC, for the Women’s March on January 21, 2017. Photo courtesy of Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images.

10. “Women March: Virtual Presentation” at the New-York Historical Society

To commemorate the centennial of women’s suffrage in the United States, curators from the institution’s Center for Women’s History will lead attendees on a virtual expedition through 200 years of women’s activism. The interactive presentation will feature a slideshow of objects and imagery that together tell the story of how women pushed the country forward on issues ranging from the abolition of slavery, to the expansion of voting, to the defense of reproductive rights. 

Price: $10 (Free for members); buy tickets here
Time: 11 a.m.–12 p.m.

—Tim Schneider

 

In the Giardini for the Venice Biennale. Image courtesy Ben Davis.

In the Giardini for the Venice Biennale. Image courtesy Ben Davis.

11. “The Exhibition” at the Central Pavilion in Venice
All of the artistic directors of the Venice Biennale will be presenting a new exhibition chronicling the most significant episodes in the biennale’s 125-year history. Drawing from its own archives as well as other national and international resources, the speakers include the Biennale’s president Roberto Cicutto and the director of the visual arts department Cecilia Alemani. The presentation of “The Exhibition”—which will run as a physical incarnation at the Central Pavilion in Venice from August 29 through December 8—will be live streamed on www.labiennale.org.

Price: Free
Time:
2:30 p.m. CET (8:30 a.m. EST)

—Naomi Rea

 

Wednesday, July 15–Monday, November 9

Kiki Smith, River Light (2019). Courtesy of Storm King Art Center.

Kiki Smith, River Light (2019). Photo courtesy of Storm King Art Center.

12. “Kiki Smith River Light” and “Outlooks: Martha Tuttle” at Storm King

Sculpture park lovers have been waiting for this moment since last fall and it’s finally here: Storm King Art Center is officially reopening and kicking off with two new exhibitions. With “River Light,” Kiki Smith will debut a series of nine flags, a new medium for the artist. The fluttering, ever-changing movements of the fabric works seek to mirror the rippling of the nearby Hudson River. The flags themselves are printed with photographic images of light reflecting on the East River, where the artist frequently spent time walking. Also on view will be emerging artist Martha Tuttle’s new installation A stone that thinks of Enceladus—a collection of human-made cairns or stone stacks composed of boulders gathered at Storm King along with molded glass and carved marble stones Tuttle made over the past winter.

Location: Storm King Art Center, 1 Museum Road, New Windsor
Time: Wednesday–Monday, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Timed ticket required.
Price: $20 per person per car for the first two people. See more about prices here. 

—Katie White

 

Opening Thursday, July 16

Installation view of “The Sewers of Mars” at Reena Spaulings Fine Art, featuring work by Ken Okiishi and Jutta Koether. Photo courtesy Nate Freeman.

13. “The Sewers of Mars” at Reena Spaulings Fine Art, New York

On Saturday I opened the nondescript door at 165 East Broadway, that dilapidated facade catty-corner from Dimes Square, went up the two stories to enter Reena Spaulings Fine Art, and suddenly my miserable streak was broken—it was the first time I had been in a gallery in four months. The space was having a soft opening for a group show, “The Sewers of Mars.” Despite the normal concerns about being inside a space where germs can go airborne, mask-on I felt safe: the gallery was empty apart from two staffers, air circulating via cracked windows and fans, and masks and sanitizer readily available.

And the show is a gift, thrilling and difficult, full of batty installation and gorgeous new paintings, a smack of cold water after an extended art drought. Front and center are four new Merlin Carpenter works, nothing but renderings of the Financial Times logo, next to a Peter Fischli bronze paper holder, inexplicable. The room is lit by Klara Liden plastic-jug lamps, and rimmed on top by Jutta Koether’s Mad Garland (version : Grand Openings at MoMA , 2011) (2011), the planks from that legendary performance tying the room together. Ken Okiishi brings back the classic tumbling Zebra wallpaper from legendary red sauce joint Gino’s for an eye-popping installation that involves his Duchamp-meets-Streeteasy works and, surprise, a Steinway & Sons piano. A new, typically fantastic Kai Althoff arrives just in time—god, what a pleasure it is to see painting again in person!

But the showstopper is a deeply affecting new painting by the Los Angeles-based artist Jill Mulleady, a gauzy olive-tinged rendering of Kobe Bryant carrying his daughter, Gianna, on his shoulders. After six months—six months that feel like years—their shocking deaths still hurt.

Location: Reena Spaulings Fine Art, 165 East Broadway, Second Floor
Price: Free
Time: Thursday–Saturday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Nate Freeman

 

Thursday, July 16

"Raphael,

14. “Back from the Dead: Raphael After 500 Years” at the International Foundation for Art Research

For its first virtual event, IFAR is celebrating the 500th anniversary of Raphael’s death with an illustrated talk by Linda Wolk-Simon, an expert in the artist and a visiting professor at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Maria Balshaw, director of the Tate. Photo Hugo Glendinning, courtesy of the Tate.

Maria Balshaw, director of the Tate. Photo by Hugo Glendinning, courtesy of the Tate.

15. “Stephan Jost and Maria Balshaw in Conversation” at the Art Gallery of Ontario

This week’s installment of the Art Gallery of Ontario’s discussion series with museum directors promises to be of special interest as both participants are reopening their institutions this month, on opposite sides of the Atlantic. AGO director Stephan Jost, who opened his museum’s doors July 2, will chat with Maria Balshaw, director of the Tate in the UK, ahead of a planned July 27 reopening.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 4 p.m.–5 p.m.

—Tanner West

Wong Ping self portrait, courtesy the artist.

Wong Ping self portrait, courtesy the artist.

16. Wong Ping Screening and Conversation with Gary Carrion-Murayari at the New Museum, New York

Join curator Gary Carrion-Murayari for a digital-discussion and screening of video art by Wong Ping, ahead of the artist’s solo show at the New Museum. Ping’s psychedelic animations might seem childlike, but they are brimming with real, relevant concerns and anxieties addressing life in Hong Kong.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 8 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Becca Hoffman, the new director of Intersect Aspen, will be driving by participating New York City galleries, and wearing the fair's signature swag — an Intersect Aspen facemask.

Becca Hoffman, the new director of Intersect Aspen, will be driving by participating New York City galleries and wearing the fair’s signature swag — an Intersect Aspen facemask.

17. New York City Gallery Drive-By With Intersect Aspen

Intersect Aspen (formerly Art Aspen), which launches online later this month (July 22–26), has more than tripled its participating galleries for the 2020 edition to 106—but of course dealers won’t be making the trip out to the affluent mountain town. But the fair is aiming to keep a personal touch: the fair’s new director Becca Hoffman will be taking to the streets of New York City, driving by participating galleries and capturing short video interviews which will be available on the fair’s website under online “Talks and Events.”

Price: Free
Time: Starting at 10 a.m.

—Nan Stewart

 

Simon Haas and Niki Haas in their Haas Brothers-designed masks. Photo courtesy of Phillips.

Simon Haas and Niki Haas in their Haas Brothers-designed masks. Photo courtesy of Phillips.

18. “It’s a Haas Thing: Niki & Simon Haas in Conversation With Silvia Karman Cubiñá” at Phillips

Catch a chat between design world darlings the Haas Brothers and Silvia Karman Cubiñá, executive director and chief curator of Miami’s Bass Museum, which staged a large-scale exhibition of their work during Art Basel in 2018. The duo has pivoted to selling face masks for charity, with all proceeds split between the Bass Museum, Artadia, the Innocence Project, and the NAACP. They’ll will talk about how recent events have influenced their practice.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Kehinde Wiley at the opening ceremony for Rumors of War (2019). Photo: Ian Douglas for Times Square Arts.

Kehinde Wiley at the opening ceremony for Rumors of War (2019). Photo: Ian Douglas for Times Square Arts.

19. “Sotheby’s x Intelligence²: 500 Years of Art” at Sotheby’s

As part of the auction house’s digital programming, art stars meet up with cultural luminaries to discuss the past, present, and future of the art world in their particular areas of expertise. This week, auctioneer Oliver Barker will moderate the conversation, featuring portraitist Kehinde Wiley and the Duke of Devonshire.

Price: Free with RSVP
Time: 6:30 p.m. BST (1:30 p.m. EST)

—Nan Stewert

 

Thursday, July 16—Wednesday July 29

Film still from "Mischa Leinkauf: Endogenous Error Terms". Image courtesy the artist and Signs and Symbols Gallery.

Film still from “Mischa Leinkauf: Endogenous Error Terms”. Image courtesy the artist and Signs and Symbols Gallery.

20. “Mischa Leinkauf: Endogenous Error Terms” at Signs and Symbols

This solo online video exhibition emerged from a seven-year research and exploration of underground water canals all over the world. Beginning in Tokyo in 2011 immediately following the Tohoku Earthquake (Fukushima disaster), Leinkauf began an intensive exploration of lifeless architectural structures that lie underground. The video features underground systems in Japan, Mongolia, Russia, Germany, Greece, Austria and Italy—bringing the viewer into a typically unexplored area of bustling metropolises.

Price: Free
Time: Opening 6 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Thursday, July 16–August 13

Anne Buckwalter, First Day of Spring, 2020 Courtesy of Monya Rowe Gallery

21. “Outside Touch” at Monya Rowe Gallery, New York

Have you been missing visiting in-person gallery shows? “Outside Touch” at Monya Rowe Gallery explores how we experience and view the outside world through the lens of the global health crisis. The show features talented young artists such as Asif Hoque, Polina Barskaya, Gretchen Scherer, Anne Buckwalter, and Kate Klingbeil, who offer works evoking feelings of longing and compassion in a time of loneliness.

Location: Monya Rowe Gallery, 224 West 30th Street, #1005
Price: Free
Time: By appointment

—Neha Jambhekar


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