Editors’ Picks: 11 Things Not to Miss in New York’s Art World This Week

From Olafur Eliasson's solar-powered night walk to Susanna Nicchiarelli's biopic of Andy Warhol-muse Nico at Film Forum, here's what's worth checking out.

Chie Fueki, Where (2017). Courtesy of DC Moore Gallery.
Chie Fueki, Where (2017). Courtesy of DC Moore Gallery.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting, and thought-provoking, shows, screenings, and events. See them below.

 

Tuesday, July 31

Alberto Giacometti painting in his Paris studio (1958). Photo by Ernst Scheidegger, courtesy of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, ©2018 Stiftung Ernst Scheidegger– Archiv, Zürich.

Alberto Giacometti painting in his Paris studio (1958). Photo by Ernst Scheidegger, courtesy of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, ©2018 Stiftung Ernst Scheidegger– Archiv, Zürich.

1. “Conversations with Contemporary Artists: Reflections on Giacometti” at the Guggenheim Museum

How has Alberto Giacometti influenced Diana al-Hadid, Huma Bhabha, and Charles Ray? The artists will tell you in their own words. Tickets include admission to the museum’s Tuesday late-night hours.

Location: The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue between East 88th and 89th Streets
Price: $15 general admission in advance, $25 at the door
Time: 6:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, August 1–Sunday, August 12

Trine Dyrholm in <i>NICO, 1988</i>, a Magnolia Pictures release. Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures.

Trine Dyrholm in NICO, 1988, a Magnolia Pictures release. Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures.

2. NICO, 1988 at Film Forum

I’ll admit that my knowledge of Nico is limited to her run as one of Andy Warhol‘s Superstars, plus a scattered few of the songs she sang, mostly with Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground. (Side note: Drake covered her poignant “These Days” a couple years ago, and it makes more sense than you think.) But if you’ve ever wondered what Nico’s last days were like, head over to Film Forum starting next Wednesday for a limited engagement of Susanna Nicchiarelli’s NICO, 1988, a dramatization of her final two years. It will fill out the end of the story in haunting fashion.

Location: Film Forum, 209 West Houston Street
Price: $15 general admission; $9 for members
Time: Daily (except Saturday, August 11–Sunday, August 12) at 12:30 p.m., 2:20 p.m., 4:15 p.m., 6:10 p.m., 8:10 p.m., and 10:10 p.m.; Saturday, August 11–Sunday, August 12 at 12:50 p.m., 2:40 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 6:20 p.m., 8:15 p.m., and 10:10 p.m.

—Tim Schneider

 

 

Wednesday, August 1–Thursday, August 30

Marsha Cottrell, <em>Untitled (9:49:46am)</em>, 2018. Courtesy of Van Doren Waxter.

Marsha Cottrell, Untitled (9:49:46am), 2018. Courtesy of Van Doren Waxter.

3. “Gaze” at the Van Doren Waxter

For the gallery’s summer group show, Van Doren Waxter has brought together nearly 60 years worth of painting, drawing, photography, and sculpture by historic figures Ellsworth Kelly and Hedda Sterne as well as by contemporary artists such as Hilary Berseth and Jeronimo Elespe. The organizing conceit is forms found in nature.

Location: Van Doren Waxter, 23 East 73rd Street
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, August 2

Poster by Karl Wirsum. Courtesy of Greene Naftali and Matthew Marks Galleries.

4. “Painting: Now and Forever Panel Discussion” at Greene Naftali Gallery

Aruna D’Souza will moderate what will surely be a lively discussion on the state of painting, between artists Nayland Blake, Jeanette Mundt, and Howardena Pindell. The discussion is being held in conjunction with the exhibition “Painting Now and Forever, Part III,” on view at Greene Naftali and Matthew Marks Gallery through August 17.

Location: Greene Naftali, 508 West 26th Street
Price: Free
Time: 6:30 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Thursday, August 2–Sunday, September 2

Howardena Pindell, <em>Free, White and 21</em> (1980). Screenshot courtesy of A.I.R. Gallery.

Howardena Pindell,
Free, White and 21 (1980). Screenshot courtesy of A.I.R. Gallery.

5. “Dialectics of Entanglement: do we exist together?” at A.I.R.

For the final show staged for its 45th-anniversary celebrations, A.I.R. revisits its important 1980 exhibition “Dialectics of Isolation: An Exhibition of Third World Women Artists of the United States,” which critiqued the American feminist movement for its exclusion of women of color. Art from artists in the original exhibition, organized by Ana Mendieta, Kazuko Miyamoto, and Zarina, are paired with contemporary work, inviting viewers to consider how our social and political situation has evolved over the past 38 years.

Location: A.I.R., 155 Plymouth Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Wednesday–Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, August 2–Saturday, September 22

Mark Morrisroe, <em>Untitled (Self Portrait Standing in the Shower)</em>, circa 1980–81. Photo courtesy of ClampArt, New York/Ringier Collection at Fotomuseum Winterthur, ©Estate of Mark Morrisroe.

Mark Morrisroe, Untitled (Self Portrait Standing in the Shower), circa 1980–81. Photo courtesy of ClampArt, New York/Ringier Collection at Fotomuseum Winterthur, ©Estate of Mark Morrisroe.

6. “Rough Trade: Art and Sex Work from the 1960s–90s” at ClampArt

Timed to the Whitney Museum of American Art’s critically acclaimed show “David Wojnarowicz: History Keeps Me Awake at Night,” Greg Ellis and Brian Paul Clamp have curated a group exhibition focusing on the sex industry, and the discrimination that often accompanied it, in the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s. David Wojnarowicz is joined by work from Kenny Burgess, Larry Clark, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Fred Halsted, Mark Morrisroe, Tomata du Plenty, John Sex, and Samuel Steward.

Location: ClampArt, 247 West 29th Street,
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, August 3

Children with the Little Sun Solar Lamps. Photo courtesy of the Little Sun Solar Lamps.

Children with the Little Sun Solar Lamps. Photo courtesy of the Little Sun Solar Lamps.

7. Solar Nightwalk on Governor’s Island

Artist Olafur Eliasson’s Little Sun Solar Lamps will light the way for this unique art experience, organized by the Usdan Summer Camp for the Arts and immersive theater producer and artist Nate Koch. As the sun sets over Governors Island, visitors will experience an “off-the-grid” guided tour of the landscape featuring, poetry, music, and art.

Location: Battery Maritime Building, 10 South Street; ferry to Governor’s Island, the Oval
Price: Free with RSVP
Time: Ferry, 6:30 p.m.–8 p.m.; walk 7:15 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Saturday, August 4

Barthélémy Toguo, <em>Road to Exile</em> (2009), Carpe Diem Arte e Pesquisa, Palace of Marquis de Pombal, Lisbon, Portugal. Photo courtesy Galerie Lelong & Co. Paris & Bandjoun Station Cameroon, ©Barthélémy Toguo.

Barthélémy Toguo, Road to Exile (2009), Carpe Diem Arte e Pesquisa, Palace of Marquis de Pombal, Lisbon, Portugal. Photo courtesy Galerie Lelong & Co. Paris & Bandjoun Station Cameroon, ©Barthélémy Toguo.

8. “Platform: Barthélémy Toguo, the Beauty of Our Voice” at the Parrish Art Museum

For his first US museum show, Barthélémy Toguo, who confronts themes of migration and colonialism in his work, presents new watercolor paintings, photography, and other multidisciplinary pieces. He’s even created a community art project, the Mobile Cafeteria, inspired by African cafes, where visitors can play African board games. The centerpiece of the exhibition will be a massive sculptural installation, Road to Exile, of a life-size boat precariously balanced on a sea of glass bottles, reflecting the dangers faced by refugees and migrants at sea.

Location: The Parrish Art Museum, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill
Price: General admission $12
Time: Opening reception for members, 5:30 p.m.–7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday–Monday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Thursday, August 9

Sandra Weiner, <em>Children sitting on rocks at port, New York City</em> (circa 1945). Photo courtesy of Steven Kasher Gallery.

Sandra Weiner, Children sitting on rocks at port, New York City (circa 1945). Photo courtesy of Steven Kasher Gallery.

9. “Sandra Weiner: New York Kids 1940–49” at Steven Kasher Gallery

Sandra Weiner’s socially minded street photography turns the camera on the poor children of New York City, capturing their joy and resiliency in the face of hardship. Many of her vintage black-and-white prints are being exhibited for the first time. Especially moving are a series of images following a boy named Mickey who lived in a tenement on East 26th Street.

Location: Steven Kasher Gallery, 515 West 26th Street, Second Floor
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Thursday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Friday, August 10

Duane Michals, <em>Zip Zap Zip</em> (2018). Courtesy of DC Moore Gallery.

Duane Michals, Zip Zap Zip (2018). Courtesy of DC Moore Gallery.

10. “Zig Zag Zig” at DC Moore Gallery

DC Moore’s summer group show pairs three new films by Duane Michals, with paintings by Chie Fueki, Joyce Kozloff, Doron Langberg, Bridget Mullen, Didier William, and Alexi Worth.

Location: DC Moore Gallery, 535 West 22nd Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Wednesday, August 22

Pascale Marthine Tayou, Colorful Line, 2018, at Richard Taittinger Gallery. Courtesy of GALLERIA CONTINUA, San Gimignano / Beijing / Les Moulins / Habana and Richard Taittinger Gallery, New York. Photo: Shark Senesac.

Pascale Marthine Tayou, Colorful Line (2018), at Richard Taittinger Gallery. Courtesy of GALLERIA CONTINUA, San Gimignano / Beijing / Les Moulins / Habana and Richard Taittinger Gallery, New York. Photo: Shark Senesac.

11. “Pascale Marthine Tayou: The Colorful Line” at Richard Taittinger Gallery

This comprehensive exhibition of Pascale Marthine Tayou’s work was curated by Jerome Sans in collaboration with Galleria Continua and takes up two floors of Richard Taittinger’s sprawling Lower East Side gallery. There is a wide range of work on view, and it all attests to the Cameroonian artist’s prodigious talents. From his blown glass and object-festooned fertility figures to floor-to-ceiling stacks of found objects, the artist has created his own vocabulary. Juxtaposing created works and found materials, he tackles issues of nationality, history, and identity.

Location: Richard Taittinger Gallery, 154 Ludlow Street
Price: Free
Time:  Tuesday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella


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