Editors’ Picks: 9 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From a Sebastião Salgado Talk at ICP to a Queer Punk Cabaret

Plus, David Adjaye talking with Rick Lowe, and "Her Dark Materials."

Nancy Cadogan, Nightshade Lady (2021). Courtesy of Eye of the Huntress.
Nancy Cadogan, Nightshade Lady (2021). Courtesy of Eye of the Huntress.

Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events in person and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Tuesday, June 22

"Her Dark Materials," a virtual group show curated by Philippa Adams at the Wolverton Works. Courtesy of Eye of the Huntress.

“Her Dark Materials,” a virtual group show curated by Philippa Adams at the Wolverton Works. Courtesy of Eye of the Huntress.

1. “Her Dark Materials” at Eye of the Huntress
This virtual group show of 27 women-identifying artists is curated by Philippa Adams, former director and curator of London’s Saatchi Gallery. Staged in design team INVI’s digital recreation of the Wolverton Works, an abandoned and historic railway facility in the U.K. recently saved from demolition, it features works by artists including Nancy Cadogan, Helen Epega, and Emma Talbot.
Price: Free
Time: On view daily at all times

—Nan Stewert

 

Wednesday, June 23

From left: Sir David Adjaye, Thelma Golden, and Rick Lowe. Courtesy of Gagosian.

From left: Sir David Adjaye, Thelma Golden, and Rick Lowe. Courtesy of Gagosian.

2. “David Adjaye and Rick Lowe” at Gagosian

On the occasion of the exhibition “Social Works” opening at Gagosian on June 24, architect David Adjaye and artist Rick Lowe will discuss their shared interest in community building, physical buildings, and how Black bodies perform in space in relation to architecture and the environment. Chief curator and director of the Studio Museum in Harlem Thelma Golden will moderate the talk.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 2 p.m. EST

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Elle Pérez, inverting (2019). Courtesy of the artist and 47 Canal, New York.

Elle Pérez, inverting (2019). Courtesy of the artist and 47 Canal, New York.

3. “In Conversation: Elle Pérez” at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh

Artist Elle Pérez’s photography practice captures moments of intimacy, vulnerability, and explores the relationship between seeing and love. In conjunction with their solo exhibition at the Carnegie Museum of Art and new body of work “Devotions,” Pérez will join director of education Dana Bishop-Root to discuss their practice and recent work. 

Time: 6 p.m.
Price:  Free with registration

–Katie White

 

Wednesday, June 23 and Thursday, June 24

 LaJuné McMillian, <em>A Movement Portrait of Renaldo Maurice</em>. Image courtesy of a Blade of Grass.

LaJuné McMillian, A Movement Portrait of Renaldo Maurice. Image courtesy of a Blade of Grass.

4. “Black Movement Library: Movement Portraits” at the Brooklyn Public Library

New media artist, creative technologist, and educator LaJuné McMillian will stage a public performance presented by A Blade of Grass and the Brooklyn Public Library, based on their ongoing project Black Movement Library. The artist’s “Movement Portraits” use perception neuron motion-capture suits to document the movements of Black people. The event will feature pre-recorded portraits mixed with performers whose motions will be translated into projected visuals in real time.

Location: Brooklyn Public Library, Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn
Price:
Free with RSVP
Time: 8:30 p.m.–10 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, June 24

Sebastião Salgado, Bela Yawanawý, from the village of Mutum from the

5. “Book Event—Sebastião Salgado on Amazônia” at the International Center of Photography, New York

The Brazilian Amazon and the indigenous people who call it home are the star of 77-year-old environmental photographer Sebastião Salgado’s final book, Sebastião Salgado: Amazônia, shot over a six-year span and published by Taschen. “For me, it is the last frontier, a mysterious universe of its own, where the immense power of nature can be felt as nowhere else on earth. Here is a forest stretching to infinity that contains one-tenth of all living plant and animal species, the world’s largest single natural laboratory,” said Salgado in a statement. He’ll talk to ICP’s managing director of programs, David Campany, about his experiences making the book and his long career using photography as a tool for activism.

Price: Suggested donation $5
Time: 1 p.m.–2 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Cao Fei and Hoda AlKhzaimi. Courtesy of NYUAD.

Cao Fei and Hoda AlKhzaimi. Courtesy of NYUAD.

6. “Representing Humanity in Virtual Reality” 

New media artist Cao Fei will join Hoda AlKhzaimi, the director of the Center of Cyber Security and NYUAD faculty member, for a conversation about how virtual reality can both enhance and hinder our actual realities. Cao Fei’s work straddles both virtual and physical realities, harnessing the powers of technology and mixed-reality games to depict the human experience. The program coincides with the virtual exhibition “not in, of, along, or relating to a line,” which features a newly commissioned work by Cao Fei that incorporates VR.

Price: Free
Time: 4 p.m. GMT (7 a.m. EST)

—Caroline Goldstein

 

Friday, June 25–September 26, 2021

Mrs. Wrightsman in the New York apartment. Photo by Cecil Beaton, Vogue, October 1, 1966. Photo by Cecil Beaton/Condé Nast via Getty Images.

Mrs. Wrightsman in the New York apartment. Photo by Cecil Beaton, Vogue, October 1, 1966. Photo by Cecil Beaton/Condé Nast via Getty Images.

7. “Bound for Versailles: The Jayne Wrightsman Bookbinds Collection” at the Morgan Library and Museum, New York

In the spring of 2019 Jayne Wrightsman, who was a longtime supporter of the museum, bequeathed to it a collection of nearly 200 volumes originally bound for the highest echelons of 18th-century French society. Owned by kings, queens, dukes, and duchesses, the books are examples of top-flight printing, engraved illustration, and artistic binding by renowned craftspeople. They exemplify the important role that women such as Madame Adélaïde (daughter of King Louis XV) and Queen Marie-Antoinette had as book owners and collectors. Illustrations by François Boucher, Jean-Baptiste Oudry, and Charles-Nicolas Cochin capture the visual ethos of the 18th century. 

Location: Morgan Library and  Museum, 225 Madison Avenue, New York
Price: 
Adults $22; Seniors $14; Students $13; Children 12 and under, accompanied adult, free
Time: Wednesday–Sunday 10:30 a.m.–5 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Friday, June 25

Matthew Silver, Jaguar Mary X and Evie Star, Chanel Matsunami Govreau, and Beechwood. Photo courtesy of Milk and Night Curatorial.

Matthew Silver, Jaguar Mary X and Evie Star, Chanel Matsunami Govreau, and Beechwood. Photo courtesy of Milk and Night Curatorial.

8. “Punk n’ Queer” at Milk and Night Curatorial, New York
Milk and Night Curatorial looks to channel the punk spirit of old New York City haunts such as Max Kansas City with a night of feminist and non-binary performance art and music. The acts are street performer Matthew Silver—a self-proclaimed “anti-artist”—Jaguar Mary X and Evie Star, Chanel Matsunami Govreau, and punk band Beechwood. Tickets include two free drinks.

Location: Ed Varie Gallery and Full Tank Moto Cafe, 49 Monroe Street, New York
Price: $35
Time: 7 p.m.–10 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Friday, July 9

"Julian

9. “Julian Stanczak: Seriality” at Mitchell-Innes and Nash, New York

In the gallery’s third exhibition on the late Op Art innovator Julian Stanczak, Mitchell-Innes and Nash has honed in on 10 large-scale, multi-panel paintings that capture the artist’s proclivity for working in series. A rare approach among other standard-bearers of the movement, seriality reflects how Stanczak’s entrancing abstractions were grounded in observation of natural phenomena, such as the way light gradates from dawn to dusk or autumn shifts to spring. This connection takes the show’s sensual pleasures beyond the realm of good vibes and grounds them in something more knowable, tangible, and memorable.

Location: Mitchell-Innes and Nash,  534 West 26th Street, New York
Price:
Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Tim Schneider


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