From the Urban Art Fair to Roberta Smith: 13 Things to See in New York This Week

Art fairs, openings, and more.

Patti Astor in February 1983 with Keith Haring’s The Smurfs and LA II. Courtesy of the Urban Art Fair/photographer Eric Kroll.
Patti Astor in February 1983 with Keith Haring’s The Smurfs and LA II. Courtesy of the Urban Art Fair/photographer Eric Kroll.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting, and thought-provoking, shows, screenings, and events. See them below.

Tuesday, June 27

Discussions will take place in the Guggenheim's Cafe 3. Image courtesy of the museum.

Discussions will take place in the Guggenheim’s Cafe 3. Image courtesy of the museum.

1. “Summer of Know: Nona Faustine and Chaédria LaBouvier” at the Guggenheim
As part of the Guggenheim’s Summer of Know conversation series, Guggenheim curators will moderate and host lively discussions among cultural creators and thinkers. This week, photographer and artist Nona Faustine and Chaédria LaBouvier, a cultural writer and scholar of Jean-Michel Basquiat, will take on the subject of cultural appropriation; Nancy Spector, artistic director and curator, will moderate.

Location: Cafe 3 in the Guggenheim Museum, 1071 5th Avenue
Price: Free with museum admission, space is limited
Time: 6:30 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein 

Roberta Smith. Courtesy of Roberta Smith.

Roberta Smith. Courtesy of Roberta Smith.

2. “Practice Lecture Series: Roberta Smith” at the School of Visual Arts
SVA’s MFA Art Practice presents a lecture from esteemed New York Times art critic Roberta Smith.

Location: School of Visual Arts, Room 501H, 335 West 16th Street
Price: Free
Time: 12:30 p.m.–2 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Tuesday, June 27–Friday, July 21

Photo © Giovanni Hänninen for the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation.

Photo © Giovanni Hänninen for the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation.

3. Thread Benefit Group Show at David Zwirner
A group show in conjunction to benefit the Thread project—a Senegal-based non-profit established by the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation. In celebration of its two-year anniversary, work on display at the gallery includes pieces donated by artists alongside photos of Thread. The proceeds from work sold at the gallery will be donated in full to the Thread project, to ensure its future in the community.

Location: David Zwirner, 533 West 19th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Tuesday, June 27–Saturday, August 5

Erik Lindman, <i>Untitled (Standing Blue)</i> (2016). Courtesy of the artist and Almine Rech.

Erik Lindman, Untitled (Standing Blue) (2016). Courtesy of the artist and Almine Rech.

4. “Erik Lindman” at Almine Rech Gallery
For his first solo exhibition in New York, where he resides, Erik Lindman brings a series of new works to Almine Rech’s NY location. Vertically oriented paintings display Lindman’s nuanced approach to painting—taking into account means of support, construction, and display.

Location: Almine Rech Gallery, 39 East 78th Street, 2nd Floor
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Tuesday, June 27–Friday, August 18

Richard Misrach, <i>Wall, Los Indios, Texas</i> (2015). Image courtesy of the artist and Pace, Pace/MacGill.

Richard Misrach, Wall, Los Indios, Texas (2015). Image courtesy of the artist and Pace, Pace/MacGill.

5. Richard Misrach and Guillermo Galindo: Border Cantos at Pace Gallery
This exhibit brings together the work of photographer Richard Misrach and Mexican-American experimental composer Guillermo Galindo, to probe the complexities within the global debate around immigration. The juxtaposition of works creates an aesthetic corollary to a philosophical, and political problem, made all the more difficult with the emotional intricacies.

Location: Pace Gallery, 510 West 25th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Tuesday, June 27–Tuesday, September 5

Aman Mojadidi's <i>Once Upon A Place</i> features re-purposed telephone booths in Times Square. Image courtesy of the artist.

Aman Mojadidi’s Once Upon A Place features re-purposed telephone booths in Times Square. Image courtesy of the artist.

6. “Once Upon a Place” at Times Square Arts
As part of public artworks in Times Square, Afghan-American artist Aman Mojadidi is bringing a relic of the urban past together with stories of the present, and future. The artist, who studied cultural anthropology, has installed three re-purposed telephone booths in the heart of Manhattan for visitors to interact with. Visitors can enter the booths, pick up the receiver, and hear one of 70 oral histories of immigrants recently arrived in New York.

Location: Duffy Square (46th Street and 7th Avenue)
Price: Free
Time: N/A

—Caroline Goldstein

Beginning Wednesday, June 28

Christian Stein in her apartment-gallery in Piazza S.Carlo in Turin surrounded by artworks by Jannis Kounellis, Luciano Fabro, and Michelangelo Pistoletto. Courtesy of Magazzino, photo by Mario Sarotto.

Christian Stein in her apartment-gallery in Piazza S.Carlo in Turin surrounded by artworks by Jannis Kounellis, Luciano Fabro, and Michelangelo Pistoletto. Courtesy of Magazzino, photo by Mario Sarotto.

7. “Margherita Stein: Rebel With a Cause” at Magazzino
Husband and wife collectors Nancy Olnick and Giorgio Spanu are finally unveiling their new warehouse art space, devoted to the Olnick Spanu collection of Italian Art. The inaugural exhibition, according to the institution website “pays tribute to Margherita Stein’s pivotal role as a pioneer of the Arte Povera movement.”

Location: Magazzino Italian Art, 2700 Route 9, Cold Spring, New York
Price: Free with appointment
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Thursday, June 29–Monday, July 3

An invitation to a Jean-Michel Basquiat show at FUN, November 1982, featuring Jean-Michel Basquiat <em>THOR</em>, and Stephen Torton, <em>Jean-Michel Basquiat signing, 'In Plumbing.' Appenzell, 1982</eM>. Courtesy of the Urban Art Fair/Patti Astor.

An invitation to a Jean-Michel Basquiat show at FUN, November 1982, featuring Jean-Michel Basquiat THOR, and Stephen Torton, Jean-Michel Basquiat signing, ‘In Plumbing.’ Appenzell, 1982. Courtesy of the Urban Art Fair/Patti Astor.

8. Urban Art Fair at Spring Studios
The Paris-based Urban Art Fair makes its New York debut, with rooftop performances, a mural on the building facade, an “Urban Influence” fashion exhibition, and the revival of Patti Astor’s legendary FUN Gallery. (Astor, a major figure of the downtown 1980s art scene, was an early champion of Keith Haring, Kenny Scharf, and Jean-Michel Basquiat.) Over 20 international galleries have signed on for the occasion, hailing from Paris, Berlin, Hong Kong, Miami, and the Bronx, among other cities.

Location: Spring Studios, 50 Varick Street/6 St. Johns Lane
Price: $17
Time: Opening reception, 4 p.m.–10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Monday, 11 a.m.–3 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Thursday, June 29–Friday, August 11

Ferdinand KRIWET, <i>Poem Print</i> (1968). © Ferdinand KRIWET; Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and BQ, Berlin.

KRIWET, Poem Print (1968). © KRIWET; Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and BQ, Berlin.

9. “KRIWET: MEDIAWAKE” at Luhring Augustine
The German artist KRIWET’s practice is rooted in Concrete Poetry—poetry whose meaning is enhanced with visual devices, typographical and other aesthetic arrangements. After traveling to NYC in 1969, his work was informed by the influx of mass media and the way it affected the political and cultural landscape.

Location: Luhring Augustine, 531 West 24th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein

Thursday, June 29–Monday, September 25

Richard Gerstl, <em> Semi-Nude Self-Portrait</em> (1902–04). Courtesy of the Leopold Museum, Vienna.

Richard Gerstl,
Semi-Nude Self-Portrait
(1902–04). Courtesy of the Leopold Museum, Vienna.

10. “Richard Gerstl” at the Neue Galerie
Chances are you haven’t heard of Richard Gerstl (1883–1908). The Austrian Expressionist painter killed himself at the age of just 25, and his work might have been forever lost, had gallerist Otto Kallir not purchased it from the artist’s family some 22 years after his death. Kallir later fled Austria for the US, where he opened Galerie St. Etienne in New York, bringing nearly every known Gerstl with him. The Neue Galerie—which is named after Kallir’s original Vienna gallery—is holding the artist’s first-ever US retrospective, showcasing 55 paintings and works on paper, as well as revealing the details of the scandalous affair that precipitated Gerstel’s untimely suicide.

Location: Neue Galerie, 1048 Fifth Avenue, New York
Price: $20
Time: Thursday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Saturday, July 1

Ugo Rondinone and John Giorno. Photo by Giasco Bertoli.

Ugo Rondinone and John Giorno. Photo by Giasco Bertoli.

11. “Welcoming the Flowers“—I ♡ John Giorno
As part of the city-wide repertoire celebrating John Giorno, Artists Space is organizing a series of events that celebrate the unique identity of Giorno, and the enduring legacy his work has enjoyed. This event is co-organized with the poet Ilka Scobie, featuring readings by a number of artists including Penny Arcade, Diana Hamilton, Joan Jonas, Ilka Scobie, Carolee Schneemann, Max Blagg, and more.

Location: Marble Cemetery, 41½ 2nd Avenue
Price: Free
Time: 2:30 p.m. (space is limited, arrive early to ensure entry)

—Caroline Goldstein 

A photo of "Merci! 1917–2017, Remember." Courtesy of ECPAD/France.

A photo of “Merci! 1917–2017, Remember.” Courtesy of ECPAD/France.

12. Preview of “Merci! 1917–2017, Remember”
French journalist and news anchor Jean-Claude Narcy has curated an exhibition of 50 photographs illustrating American support of the French during World War I. It will open for its full run on Veterans Day (November 11), but catch a sneak peek now, during a special day of arts programming marking the US entrance into the war. Titled “How 1917 Changed the World: A Centennial Commemoration of the United States Entrance Into World War I,” it is a yearlong cultural and educational initiative from the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States and the French Consulate in New York.

The day’s festivities will also include a SummerStage concert inspired by the arrival of jazz in Europe, 5 p.m.–10 p.m. at Rumsey Playground; and a Legion of Honor Ceremony honoring a group of about 20 World War II vets, at 3:30 p.m.

Location: Naumburg Bandshell on the Mall, Central Park, 5th Avenue at 72nd Street
Price: Free
Time: 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; tour at 3 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Saturday, July 1–Thursday, September 7

Alvin Balemesa, from the National Association of Women Artists “Away!” exhibition. Courtesy of the National Association of Women Artists.

13. “Away” at the Mulberry Street Library
Stuck in the city this summer? Escape at this juried group show of work exploring the ways in which we refresh ourselves, renew our energies, and escape from the daily grind. It’s organized by the National Association of Women Artists (NAWA), founded in 1889 and the oldest women’s fine art organization in the country.

Location: Mulberry Street Library, Community Room Gallery, 10 Jersey Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, Saturday, July 15, 2 p.m.–4 p.m.; Monday and Wednesday, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; Tuesday, 10 a.m.–7 p.m.; Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone


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