Editors’ Picks: 14 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week, From International Women’s Day Celebrations to a Look at Artemisia Gentileschi’s Influences

Plus, check out the latest edition of our Artnet Talks and see works by Brazilian artist Amelia Toledo.

Installation view,
Installation view, "Never Done: 100 Years of Women in Politics and Beyond" at Skidmore's Tang Museum.

Each week, we search for the most exciting and thought-provoking shows, screenings, and events. In light of the global health crisis, we are currently highlighting events in person and digitally, as well as in-person exhibitions open in the New York area. See our picks from around the world below. (Times are all EST unless otherwise noted.)

 

Monday, March 8

Marina Abramović, <em>The Hero (Family story of my father who was a hero in the Second World War in Yugoslavia)</em>, 2001. Photo courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC.

Marina Abramović, The Hero (Family story of my father who was a hero in the Second World War in Yugoslavia) (2001). Photo courtesy of the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC.

1. “International Women’s Day: Virtual Festival” at the National Museum for Women in the Arts, Washington, DC

What better place to celebrate International Women’s Day than at the National Museum for Women in the Arts? The day-long festival’s activities kick off with a Zoom explainer about the museum’s #5WomenArtists social media campaign, with various presentations and discussions throughout the day, plus a happy hour celebrating artist Julia López with a cocktail recipe from chef Teresa Padilla.

Price: Free
Time: 11 a.m.–7:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Susan J. Mumford, founder of AWAD, and Sara Kay, founder of POWarts. Photo courtesy of AWAD and POWarts.

Susan J. Mumford, founder of AWAD, and Sara Kay, founder of POWarts. Photo courtesy of AWAD and POWarts.

2. “AWAD x POWarts: Celebration of Resilience, IWD 2021” 

The Association of Women Art Dealers and the Professional Organization of Women in the Arts celebrate International Women’s Day by asking their members to share their experiences over the past year and the changes they’ve faced. AWAD founder Susan J. Mumford and POWarts founder Sara Kay will host.

Price: $15 suggested donation
Time: 12 p.m.–1 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Loira Limbal, Through the Night (2020). Video still courtesy of the artist.

Loira Limbal, Through the Night (2020). Video still courtesy of the artist.

3. “Seminar 5: Protocols of Revolutionary Feminisms to Re/Make the World” at the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, New School, New York

The New School celebrates International Women’s Day with its fifth “As Protocols” seminar on radical feminism. Faculty members Ujju Aggarwal and Laura Y. Liu will lead a Zoom conversation with filmmaker Loira Limbal, historian Robyn Spencer, community organizer Paula X. Rojas, and professor Nadine Naber.

Price: Free
Time: 3 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Our panelists, from left: Hannah Gottlieb-Graham, Laura Currie, Rakeb Sile, Sarah Cascone, and Tiana Webb Evans.

Our panelists, from left: Hannah Gottlieb-Graham, Laura Currie, Rakeb Sile, Sarah Cascone, and Tiana Webb Evans.

4. “Artnet Talks: Female Leaders in the Art Business on Navigating the Challenges of the Pandemic” 

Artnet News senior writer Sarah Cascone, co-founder of Young Women in the Arts, will moderate a virtual panel discussion with art-world business owners Hannah Gottlieb-Graham, Laura Currie, Rakeb Sile, and Tiana Webb Evans about how they’ve stayed on track over the past year despite the financial downturn and the constraints of lockdown. The talk, held in honor of International Women’s Day, will also consider the ways in which the pandemic has negatively impacted gender equity.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 5 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Katie Rothstein

 

Leah Modigliani, details from 15 foot long accordion book <em>​The City in Her Desolation</em> (2017). Photo courtesy of Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art.

Leah Modigliani, details from 15 foot long accordion book ​The City in Her Desolation (2017). Photo courtesy of Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art.

5. Making Space: The Man-Made City.”at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts

The first in a three-part series of talks delving into the academy’s current show, “Taking Space: Contemporary Women Artists and the Politics of Scale” (through September 5) kicks off with a lecture by contemporary art curator Jodi Throckmorton, who organized the exhibition. On March 15, PAFA curator Brittany Webb will present “Making Space: Feminist Urban Visions, as things wrap on March 23 with “Making Space: Movement for Change.” All three events are hosted by Leslie Kern, whose book, Feminist City, exposes social inequalities that are built into cities, homes, and neighborhoods.

Price: $50 for series or $20 per class; PAFA Members: $35 for the series or $15 per class
Time: 6 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

 

Wednesday, March 10

Pioneering Women Conference. Photo courtesy of the Royal Society of Sculptors.

Pioneering Women Conference. Photo courtesy of the Royal Society of Sculptors.

6. “Pioneering Women Conference” at the Royal Society of Sculptors, London

The Royal Society of Sculptors presents the results of its research project, “Pioneering Women at the Heart of the Royal Society of Sculptors.” A full day of virtual programming includes panel discussions, a screening of the documentary Anne Acheson: The Art of Medicine, and keynote speaker Pauline Rose, author of Working Against the Grain: Women Sculptors in Britain, 1885–1950.

Price: Free with registration
Time: 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m. GMT

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, March 11

<em>Artemisia Gentileschi and Feminism in Early Modern Europe</em> (London: Reaktion Books, 2020) and author Mary Garrard.

Artemisia Gentileschi and Feminism in Early Modern Europe (London: Reaktion Books, 2020) and author Mary Garrard.

7. “Artemisia Gentileschi and Feminism in Renaissance Europe” at Society for the Study of Women in the Renaissance and the CUNY Academy for Humanities and Sciences

Mary D. Garrard will speak about her latest book, Artemisia Gentileschi and Feminism in Early Modern Europe, which considers the great proto-feminist artist’s knowledge of contemporary feminist writers such as Lucrezia Marinella and Arcangela Tarabotti, and whether a growing feminist sentiment across Early Modern Italy influenced Gentileschi’s work.

Price: Free
Time: 6 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, March 12 

Katherine Bradford, Superheroes (2019). Collection of nancy Mladenoff and J.J. Murphy.

Katherine Bradford, Superheroes (2019). Collection of nancy Mladenoff and J.J. Murphy.

8. “Curatorial Perspective: ‘Never Done: 100 Years of Women in Politics and Beyond’” at ArtTable

ArtTable goes behind the scenes at the exhibition “Never Done: 100 Years of Women in Politics and Beyond” at the Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, with a Zoom talk with curators Rachel Seligman and Minita Sanghvi. Among the artists included the show, which celebrates the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment giving women the vote, are Jordan Casteel, the Guerrilla Girls, Julie Mehretu, Joan Mitchell, Catherine Opie, Wendy Red Star, Faith Ringgold, Tschabalala Self, Cindy Sherman, and Carrie Mae Weems.

Price: $15 general admission
Time: 12 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Sunday, March 14

"T.rex: The Ultimate Predator." Courtesy of the American Museum of Natural History, New York.

“T.rex: The Ultimate Predator.” Courtesy of the American Museum of Natural History, New York.

9. “T.rex: The Ultimate Predator” at the American Museum of Natural History, New York

This weekend marks your last chance to see the American Museum of Natural History’s fascinating exhibition on the world’s most famous dinosaur, the Tyrannosaurus rex. Based on the latest research from paleontologists, experts now believe the T.rex—as the name is written scientifically—was born covered in feathers, a tiny, helpless baby that packed on close to five pounds a day to reach its adult size of 15,000 pounds and 40 feet long. The show includes life-size models of the T.rex at various stages of development, as well as an impressive fossil skeleton, and offers a plethora fascinating facts about the species.

Location: American Museum of Natural History, 200 Central Park West, New York
Price: Adults $28
Time: Wednesday–Sunday, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, March 20

Peter Sacks, Above Our Cities 8, 2020 Courtesy of Sperone Westwater

10. “Peter Sacks: Republic” at Sperone Westwater, New York

Make sure to catch “Peter Sacks: Republic” at Sperone Westwater, the South African artist’s first solo show with the gallery. Peter Sacks grew up fighting Apartheid, and his work is a direct reference to those roots. This exhibition consists of collages, works on paper, and one assemblage, bringing up feelings of “impermanence and loss,” and alluding to globalization and the artist’s upbringing. The collages use both everyday fabrics, such as burlap and cotton, as well as exotic ones from India, other African nations, and Japan, taking this medium to a higher level.

Location: Sperone Westwater, 257 Bowery, New York, NY
Price:
 Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. and by appointment on Monday

—Neha Jambhekar

Through Saturday, March 27

Guadalupe Maravilla, Disease Thrower #3 (2019). Photo courtesy of PPOW.

Guadalupe Maravilla, Disease Thrower #3 (2019). Photo courtesy of PPOW.

11. “Guadalupe Maravilla: Seven Ancestral Stomachs” at PPOW, New York

Guadalupe Maravilla has spent the better part of the last year dedicated to mutual aid, personally purchasing and delivering 1,500 pounds of grains to food insecure, marginalized communities across the city on a weekly basis. Somehow, he also found time to put together his first show for PPOW, featuring his “Disease Thrower” sculptures, elaborate shrine-like works with large metal gongs. Maravilla began incorporating these instruments into his work after being treated with sound therapy during his recovery from colon cancer—an illness he believes was a physical manifestation of the stresses he experienced as an unaccompanied minor immigrating to this country from El Salvador in the 1980s. The gallery is also hosting private “sound bath” sessions with the artist—an extension of weekly events he’s been holding for the community at Brooklyn’s Good Shepard Lutheran Church—where the sculptures will be activated, filling the space with sonic vibrations said to have healing powers, on Thursday and Friday evenings.

Location: PPOW, 392 Broadway, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. by appointment; sound baths require reservation

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Sunday, March 28

Anjuli Rathod, Knots, 2021. Courtesy of Selenas Mountain.

12. “These Opalescent Dreams of Mine” at Selenas Mountain, New York

Works by artists Amy Bravo, Larissa De Jesús Negrón, and Anjuli Rathod are on view in a group show at Ridgewood gallery, Selenas Mountain. Each artist reflects on the themes of isolation and desire, creating “vessel(s) for storytelling and world-building” with surrealist imagery. Bravo’s textured paintings and sculptures depict utopian worlds centered around ancestral healing. Rathod explores the afterlife and blurring the lines between the spiritual and physical world. De Jesús Negrón transforms domestic spaces into portals to the future and past.

Location: Selenas Mountain, 63 Woodward Ave #6321, Ridgewood, New York
Price: Free
Time: By appointment

—Cristina Cruz

 

Through Saturday, April 3

Allison Zuckerman: Gone Wild, Installation View Courtesy of Kravets Wehby Gallery

13. “Allison Zuckerman: Gone Wild” at Kravets Wehby Gallery, New York

Step into spring with Allison Zuckerman’s solo exhibition at Kravets Wehby Gallery featuring new paintings that were published in the January issue of Vogue Italia. The enticing paintings feature various flora and fauna, a recurring theme in Zuckerman’s work, as well as nods to fashion houses, making it an Instagrammer’s dream come true.

Location: Kravets Wehby Gallery, 521 West 21st Street, New York
Price:
 Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Neha Jambhekar

 

Through Saturday, April 17

Installation view of 'Amelia Toledo: 1958-2007' at Galeria Nara Roesler. Photo by Charles Roussel. Image courtesy Galeria Nara Roesler

Installation view of ‘Amelia Toledo: 1958-2007’ at Galeria Nara Roesler. Photo by Charles Roussel. Image courtesy Galeria Nara Roesler

14. “Amelia Toledo: 1958-2007” at Galeria Nara Roesler, New York

This show is something of a mini-retrospective and a fitting introduction for an under-recognized Brazilian art star. Toledo’s prolific and expansive range across a five-decade career immediately sparks connections to major artistic movements such as Constructivism and Neoconcretism. Later works that involve exploration and experiments with nature and the natural world draw parallels with earth, or light and space artworks. Toledo was featured in several solo and group exhibitions in Brazil earlier this decade, and was most recently included in the show “Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985″ at the Hammer Museum.

Location: Galeria Nara Roesler, 511 West 21st Street, New York
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m. by appointment

—Eileen Kinsella


Follow Artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.

Share

Article topics