Editors’ Picks, Print Week Edition: 21 Things Not to Miss in New York’s Art World This Week

It's Print Week, with three different New York print fairs, plus antiques at TEFAF and AADLA, and October Art Week on the Upper East Side.

Janet Fish, Daffodils. Courtesy of Stewart & Stewart.
Janet Fish, Daffodils. Courtesy of Stewart & Stewart.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting, and thought-provoking, shows, screenings, and events. See them below.

Monday, October 22

Liza Lou, <em>Noctilucent</em> (detail), 2018. Photo courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Soul.

Liza Lou, Noctilucent (detail), 2018. Photo courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Soul.

1. “Liza Lou in Conversation With Francine Prose” at the New York Public Library

As Liza Lou wraps up her solo exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, “Classification and Nomenclature of Clouds (on view through October 27), she’ll talk with writer and critic Francine Prose about her practice working with glass beads and South African bead workers.

Location: New York Public Library, Jefferson Market Library, 425 Sixth Avenue, 1st Floor
Price: Free with RSVP
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Tuesday, October 23

Mickalene Thomas, <em>déjeuner su Therbe: Las Trois Femmes Noires</em> (2010). Photo courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul. 

Mickalene Thomas, déjeuner su Therbe: Las Trois Femmes Noires (2010). Photo courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul.

2. ICP Spotlights: Mickalene Thomas at 583 Park Avenue

Every year, the International Center for Photography’s Spotlights luncheon honors a women artists working in film and photography. This year’s honoree, Mickalene Thomas, will speak with author and academic Beverly Guy-Sheftall, the founding director of the Women’s Research and Resource Center at Spelman College, Atlanta.

Location: 583 Park Avenue
Price: $400
Time: 11:30 a.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, October 24

maya-lin-gish-prize

Maya Lin. Photo: ©Patrick McMullan Company, Inc.

3. “Makers of Modern Architecture: Maya Lin in Conversation with Martin Filler” at the 92nd Street Y

Upon the publication of his new book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume III, architecture critic Martin Filler will speak with Maya Lin, who appears on the book’s cover, about how she faced down racism and sexism to become one of the world’s best-known architects. The evening will also include a book signing.

Location: 92nd Street Y, Buttenwieser Hall, 1395 Lexington Avenue
Price: $35
Time: 8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Jarrett Earnest, <em>What it Means to Write About Art</em>. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Books.

Jarrett Earnest, What it Means to Write About Art. Photo courtesy of David Zwirner Books.

4. Jarrett Earnest with Rosalind Krauss and Molly Nesbit at David Zwirner Books

For his new book, What It Means to Write About Art, Jarrett Earnest interviewed art critics, historians, journalists, novels, poets, and others to attempt to answer the titular question. He’ll continue that conversation live with historian Molly Nesbit and art critic Rosalind Krauss.

Location: David Zwirner Books, 519 West 19th Street
Price: Free
Time: 6:30.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, October 25

Dawoud Bey, <em>Hilary and Taro</em> (1992). Photo courtesy of the artist.

Dawoud Bey, Hilary and Taro (1992). Photo courtesy of the artist.

5. Dawoud Bey in Conversation With Rebecca Walker at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Timed to the publication of the artist’s new book, Dawoud Bey will talk with writer and activist Rebecca Walker.

Location: Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street
Price: $10
Time: 6:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Thursday, October 25–Saturday, October 27

PrintFest by IPCNY. Photo courtesy of the International Print Center New York

PrintFest by IPCNY. Photo courtesy of the International Print Center New York

6. PrintFest by IPCNY at the International Print Center New York 

The IPCNY is giving MFA and senior BFA students from schools including New York’s New School Parsons School of Design, the Rhode Island School of Design, and the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan the chance to show and sell their work during Print Week. Programming includes demonstrations, a panel discussion, and the chance to take part in a collaborative monotype animation project.

Location: IPCNY, 508 West 26th Street, 3rd and 5th Floor
Price: Free
Time: Thursday, 5 p.m.–9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Wednesday, October 24–Sunday, October 28

Tacita Dean, <em>Quarantania</em>. Photo courtesy of International Fine Print Dealer Association.

Tacita Dean, Quarantania. Photo courtesy of International Fine Print Dealer Association.

7. International Fine Print Dealers Association  Fine Art Print Fair at the Javits Center
Pick up a print by an Old Master or a few contemporary art editions at this showcase of 80 IFPDA member galleries, the world’s largest dedicated printmaking art fair. Highlights will include works related to major fall exhibitions here in New York, such as Bruce Nauman at the Museum of Modern Art—Brooke Alexander, Inc., offers the lithograph and screenprint Clear Vision (1973)—and the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Eugène Delacroix blockbuster—Ursus Books is selling an 1828 edition of Faust with 18 lithographs by the artist, including a portrait of the author, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.

Location: River Pavilion, Javits Center, 11th Avenue at 35th Street
Price: General admission $25
Time: Wednesday preview, 6:30 p.m.–9 p.m.; Thursday–Saturday, 12 p.m.–8 p.m.; Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, October 25–Sunday, October 28

The Editions/Artists’ Books Fair. Photo courtesy of the Editions/Artists’ Books Fair.

The Editions/Artists’ Books Fair. Photo courtesy of the Editions/Artists’ Books Fair.

8. Editions/Artists’ Books Fair at the Tunnel

Founded 20 years ago, the Editions/Artists’ Books Fair will showcase prints, multiples, and artists’ books from 50 exhibitors from around the world in its 2018 edition. Artist Saya Woolfalk will speak with curator Dexter Wimberly about prints and politics on Saturday at 3 p.m.

Location: The Tunnel, 269 11th Avenue between West 27th and 28th Streets
Price: Free
Time: VIP preview, 3 p.m.–9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Mabel Alington Royds, <em>Tightrope Dancer</em>. Courtesy of Conrad R. Graeber Fine Art.

Mabel Alington Royds, Tightrope Dancer. Courtesy of Conrad R. Graeber Fine Art.

9. The New York Satellite Print Fair at Mercantile Annex 37

Just steps from the main event at the Javits Center, another 17 dealers bring a wide range of prints, drawings, and works on paper by everyone from Old Masters Rembrandt van Rijn and Francisco Goya to 20th century American artists such as Thomas Hart Benton.

Location: Mercantile Annex 37, 517 West 37th Street
Price: Free
Time: Thursday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–7 p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, October 25–Thursday, November 1

Eugène Delacroix, <em>Hercules and Hippolyte</em>. Courtesy of Jill Newhouse Gallery

Eugène Delacroix, Hercules and Hippolyte. Courtesy of Jill Newhouse Gallery

10. October Art Week on the Upper East Side

With TEFAF touching down in New York and Christie’s holding its Classic Art Week, over a dozen Upper East Side galleries are getting in on the action by opening their doors for the third annual October Art Week. Exhibitions on view include “Eugène Delacroix: Drawings, Watercolors, Pastels and Small Oils,” hosted by Jill Newhouse Gallery in association with the Paris-based Galerie de Bayser.

Location: Various locations
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 5 p.m.–9 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, October 25–Saturday, December 8

Work by Janaina Tschäpe for her new exhibition "HumidGray and ShadowLake." Photo courtesy of Sean Kelly.

Work by Janaina Tschäpe for her new exhibition “HumidGray and ShadowLake.” Photo courtesy of Sean Kelly.

11. “Janaina Tschäpe: HumidGray and ShadowLake” at Sean Kelly

Multidisciplinary artist Janaina Tschäpe, born in Munich and raised in São Paulo, makes films, photographs, sculptures, and performance art, among other work. Her first show at Sean Kelly, however, is dedicated to the large-scale paintings and watercolors that lie at the heart of her practice, abstract works that suggest landscapes and organic forms.

Location: Sean Kelly, 475 Tenth Avenue
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Friday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Thursday, October 25–Saturday, December 15

"Neil

Neil Goldberg, “Inhibited Bites (performance)” (2018). Courtesy of Cristin Tierney Gallery.

12. “Neil Goldberg: Vote in the Midterm Elections” at Cristin Tierney

Blending studio practice, personal history, and political action, Neil Goldberg’s new show centers on the “often-daily” note cards he has written to guide his work for roughly the past 20 years. A translucent, spinning container continuously shuffles dozens of the cards inside the exhibition, with the contents doing double duty as records of origin for the other pieces in the show and, on most Fridays and Saturdays, randomized prompts for conversations that Goldberg will hold with interested gallery visitors. At the opening, the artist and members of activist group the Creative Resistance will give visitors an opportunity to sign up for canvassing duty in advance of next month’s midterms.

Location: 540 West 28th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Tim Schneider

 

Friday, October 26–Monday, October 29

"Thomas

13. The AADLA Fine Art & Antiques Show at Wallace Hall

TEFAF isn’t the only antiques show in town this week, with another 27 dealers showcasing their best Old Masters, rare books, and English furniture, among other treasures.

Location: Wallace Hall, Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, 980 Park Avenue at East 84th Street
Price: $20
Time: Friday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; Monday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Karen Finley. Photo by Lori E. Seid.

Karen Finley. Photo by Lori E. Seid.

14. Call to Action! at La Mama

Ahead of the all-important midterm elections, La Mama hosts a weekend of political art performances. On Friday, women and non-conforming artists will host a night of song, poetry, and spoken word in “Soapbox: Speak Up, Speak Out!” Saturday, performance artist Karen Finley will give a monologue, Grabbing Pussy, and present a new work, Parts Known, inspired by border separations and the suicides of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain. Activist group You Matter Nation and former Barack Obama digital director Benjamin Yee will close out the weekend on Sunday with (Real) Politics 101.

Location: La Mama, 66 East 4th Street, between Bowery and 2nd Avenue
Price: Between $10 and $20 with suggested donations to the ACLU, Planned Parenthood, and You Matter Nation
Time: Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday 2 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday, October 26–Wednesday, October 31

Gilbert Stuart, <em>George Washington (Munro Lenox Portrait)</em>. Courtesy of Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc.

Gilbert Stuart, George Washington (Munro Lenox Portrait). Courtesy of Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc.

15. TEFAF New York Fall at the Park Avenue Armory

Spanning antiquity to the year 1920, TEFAF, now its third fall New York edition, presents both fine and decorative art from 93 international exhibitors. Don’t miss Gilbert Stuart’s famed portrait of George Washington, this one the Munro-Lenox Portrait, on offer from New York’s Hirschl & Adler Galleries, or a 1733 map of European colonies in North America, for sale from Daniel Crouch Rare Books.

Location: Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Avenue
Price: General admission $55
Time: Friday VIP preview, 1 p.m.–8 p.m.; Saturday, Monday, and Tuesday, 11 a.m.–8 p.m.; Sunday and Wednesday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m. (VIPs only 11 a.m.–12 p.m.)

—Sarah Cascone

 

 

Saturday, October 27–January 19, 2019

Richard Pettibone Andy Warhol, ‘Jackie’, 1964 (four times); Roy Lichtenstein, <em>‘Aloha’, 1962 and ‘The Refrigerator’, 1962</em> (1971).Courtesy the artist and Castelli Gallery.

Richard Pettibone
Andy Warhol, ‘Jackie’, 1964 (four times); Roy Lichtenstein, ‘Aloha’, 1962 and ‘The Refrigerator’, 1962 (1971).Courtesy the artist and Castelli Gallery.

16. “Richard Pettibone: Endless Variation” at FLAG Art Foundation

This Richard Pettibone show could be confused for a group exhibition: in fusing the Pop and Appropriation movements, he had created small-scale copies—some no bigger than two inches square—of instantly recognizable works by the likes of Marcel Duchamp, Roy Lichtenstein, and Andy Warhol.

Location: FLAG Art Foundation, 545 West 25th Street, 9th Floor
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Wednesday,–Saturday, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Saturday, October 27–Monday, November 12

Emma Ressel, <em>Untitled</em> (2016). Photo courtesy of the artist.Emma Ressel, <em>Untitled</em> (2016). Photo courtesy of the artist.

Emma Ressel, Untitled (2016). Photo courtesy of the artist.

17. “Emma Ressel: Olives in the Street” at Bard College

The rich culinary traditions of Emilia-Romagna became artistic fodder for Bard College alumna Emma Ressel during a 2016 artist residency in Lugo, Italy. The streets of town became her studio, the set for still-life photographs that at first appear enticing, but reveal bizarre ingredient combinations and elements of decay upon closer examination, undermining the initial sense of aesthetic pleasure.

Location: Woods Studio Gallery at Bard College, 23 Woods Road, Annandale-On-Hudson, New York
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 11 a.m.–1 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, October 27

Peter Alexander at Franklin Parrasch Gallery. Photo copyright Adam Reich / courtesy Franklin Parrasch Gallery.

18. “Peter Alexander: Recent Works” at Franklin Parrasch Gallery

Listen, the world is noisy and scary and confusing right now. Why not take 20 minutes to bask in hypnotic new sculptures by Peter Alexander? The 79-year-old Los Angeles-based artist, part of the Light and Space movement, creates works that reflect light and ooze luscious color. You probably can’t bring a yoga mat and meditate in the gallery, but you’ll want to. Catch it before it’s closed.

Location: 53 E 64th Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Julia Halperin

 

Through Sunday, October 28

Poetry in Motion Car Card featuring poetry by Marilyn Nelson and artwork from Philemona Williamson’s “Seasons” (2007). Designed by Tess O’Loughlin. Featured on subway cars and buses in the past year. Courtesy of MTA Arts & Design.

Poetry in Motion Car Card featuring poetry by Marilyn Nelson and artwork from Philemona Williamson’s “Seasons” (2007). Designed by Tess O’Loughlin. Featured on subway cars and buses in the past year. Courtesy of MTA Arts & Design.

19. “Poetry in Motion at 25” at the New York Transit Museum Gallery & Store

For 25 years, New Yorkers have caught glimpses of poetry on subways and buses, a selection of over 200 pieces starting with an excerpt of Walt Whitman’s “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” displayed by the MTA back in 1992. The program is now run through a collaboration between the MTA Arts & Design and the Poetry Society of America, and you can catch some its greatest hits in this exhibition from the New York Transit Museum.

Location: Grand Central Terminal, 89 East 42nd Street (just off the Main Concourse in the Shuttle Passage, adjacent to the Station Masters’ Office)
Price: Free
Time: Monday–Friday, 8 a.m.–8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

An installation at "The Senses: Design Beyond Vision" at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Photo courtesy of the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

An installation at “The Senses: Design Beyond Vision” at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Photo courtesy of the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

20. “The Senses: Design Beyond Vision” at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

The Cooper Hewitt is fighting the good fight against our increasingly plugged-in digital world with an exhibition that defies traditional museum prohibitions against touching the art, and is designed to engage all five senses. Some of the pieces have been designed to help those with sensory disabilities such as blindness and deafness, like an easier-to-learn alternative to braille. Others, like scratch-n-sniff cherry wallpaper, are more whimsical.

Location: Cooper Hewitt, 2 East 91st Street
Price: General admission $18
Time: Sunday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.–9 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Through Saturday, November 3

Harvey Quaytman, Mirror to Damascus (1971). Courtesy of Van Doren Waxter.

21. “Harvey Quaytman: Rockers and Pendulums, 1969–1977” at Van Doren Waxter

Van Doren Waxter’s show of the self-proclaimed “classical modernist” artist Harvey Quaytman comes right as his first large-scale museum show gets underway at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive. Quaytman’s shaped canvases helped to usher in a new way of understanding painting by incorporating sculptural elements like curved shapes, giving the illusion of the canvases sitting on rockers that could be set in motion.

Location: Van Doren Waxter, 195 Chrystie Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein


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