Editors’ Picks: 15 Things to See in New York This Week

Don't miss the return of the New Museum's Ideas City!

Stephanie Keith, a photo from "Killing the Black Snake: Resistance at Standing Rock" on view a Photoville. Courtesy of Photoville.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting, and thought-provoking, shows, screenings, and events. See them below.

Tuesday, September 12

Courtesy of High Line Art.

Courtesy of High Line Art.

1. La Deliciosa Show: Poetry Readings on the High Line
Contemporary poets Steven Alvarez, Marie Buck, Karen Emmerich, Nicole Sealey, and Javier Zamora will read their work at Radamés “Juni” Figueroa’s site-specific High Line installation, La Deliciosa Show. The event is part of the High Line’s current open-air group show, “Mutations.”

Location: The High Line, West 30th Street and 10th Avenue
Price: Free
Time: 6:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Tuesday, September 12–Sunday, September 17

John Zorn, photograph by Scott Irvine. Courtesy of The Drawing Center.

John Zorn, photograph by Scott Irvine. Courtesy of The Drawing Center.

2. “The Stone” at the Drawing Center
In 2005, American composer John Zorn founded the experimental music space The Stone on the Lower East Side. In anticipation of The Stone’s move to its new Greenwich Village home, at the New School for Social Research, the Drawing Center will host a series of performances by musical artists such as Marco Cappelli, Zeena Parkins, and Ikue Mori, among others.

Location: The Drawing Center, 35 Wooster Street
Price: $20
Time: Doors 7 p.m., performances 7:30 p.m.

—Hannah Pikaart

Tuesday, September 12–Saturday, October 28 

Alighiero Boetti, <em>Mappa (Map)</em>, 1988. Courtesy of photographer Wilfried Petzi, Munich. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome Courtesy Kunstmuseum Basel and Sammlung Goetz, München.

Alighiero Boetti, Mappa (Map), 1988. Courtesy of photographer Wilfried Petzi, Munich. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. Courtesy Kunstmuseum Basel and Sammlung Goetz, München.

3. “Arte Povera,” curated by Ingvild Goetz, at Hauser & Wirth
Arte Povera collector Ingvild Goetz explores this groundbreaking 20th-century Italian art movement, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, with this exhibition, which features more than 100 works by Alighiero Boetti, Pier Paolo Calzolari, Jannis Kounellis, Mario Merz, and Michelangelo Pistoletto, among others. The artwork will be supplemented by rare materials from Goetz’s personal library.

Location: Hauser & Wirth, 548 West 22nd Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Tuesday, September 12–Saturday, October 28

Alex Katz, <em>Richard Bellamy</em> (1960). Courtesy of the Whitney Museum of American Art/VAGA, New York.

Alex Katz, Richard Bellamy (1960). Courtesy of the Whitney Museum of American Art/VAGA, New York.

4. “Deadeye Dick: Richard Bellamy and His Circle” at Peter Freeman, Inc.
Pioneering gallerist Richard Bellamy helped launch and foster the careers of many artists beginning in the 1960s and continuing through the 1990s, including such disparate figures as Donald Judd, Mark di Suvero, Claes Oldenburg, and Richard Serra. Peter Freeman presents “Deadeye Dick: Richard Bellamy and His Circle,” an exhibition that shines a light on Bellamy’s little-known career, and features works from over 40 artists. The show is curated by the dealer’s biographer, Judith Stein, who recently published Eye of the Sixties: Richard Bellamy and the Transformation of Modern Art.

Location: Peter Freeman, Inc., 140 Grand Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Wednesday, September 16–Sunday, September 17, and Thursday, September 21–Sunday, September 24

Nichole Sobecki, from the "A Climate for Conflict" exhibition at Photoville. Courtesy of Photoville.

Nichole Sobecki, from the “A Climate for Conflict” exhibition at Photoville. Courtesy of Photoville.

5. Photoville at Brooklyn Bridge Plaza
A photography village pops up in Brooklyn, housed in more than 55 shipping containers that have been transformed into art galleries. Expect timely, politically charged work, like photographer Nichole Sobecki and journalist Laura Heaton’s “A Climate for Conflict,” a series documenting the devastating effects of drought in Somalia; Stephanie Keith’s photos of the protests at Standing Rock; and Kisha Bari’s “ReSisters: Behind the Scenes of the Women’s March.”

Location: Brooklyn Bridge Plaza, at the corner of Water Street and New Dock Street
Price: $5 suggested donation
Time: Opening reception, 4 p.m.–10 p.m., party begins at 7 p.m.; 12 p.m.–10 p.m.; closing day, 12 p.m.–8 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Thursday, September 14

Kambui Olujimi, <em>Untitled</em> (detail), from the series "T-Minus Ø" (2017). Courtesy the artist

Kambui Olujimi, Untitled (detail), from the series “T-Minus Ø” (2017). Courtesy the artist.

6. Kambui Olujimi, Where Does the Time Go… at Lincoln Center
Visual artist Kambui Olujimi’s short film “Where Does The Time Go…” chronicles the research of pseudo-scientist Ames C. Vera, who travels door to door across the multiverse conducting interviews about missing time. The film will feature a live score, and will be followed by a Q&A with the filmmaker.

Location: David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center, 61 West 62nd Street
Price: Free
Time: 7:30 p.m.–9 p.m.

—Hannah Pikaart

The dapperQ R/evolution Fashion Show Flyer.. Photo: Courtesy of dapperQ.

The dapperQ R/evolution Fashion Show. Photo: Courtesy of dapperQ.

7. “dapperQ Presents R/Evolution” at the Brooklyn Museum 
The annual Queer Runway Show celebrates the end of New York Fashion Week at the Brooklyn Museum. Enjoy drinks sponsored by Henrietta Hudson Bar and Girl and shop in one of the many pop-ups before the 70 models representing a range of LGBTQIA+ identities hit the runway, clad in threads from designers such as Bindle & Keep, Nicole Wilson, and Stuzo.

Location: 200 Eastern Parkway
Price: $10
Time: 6 p.m.–10 p.m.

—Eleonore Marie Stifter

Thursday, September 14–Saturday, October 14

Rudolph Burckhardt, A Walk though Astoria and Other Places in Queens (1943). Courtesy Bruce Silverstein Gallery

8. “A Walk through Astoria and Other Places in Queens, 1943” by Rudolph Burckhardt and Edwin Denby at Bruce Silverstein Gallery
Bruce Silverstein presents a show of 71 vintage gelatin silver prints and five typed sonnets by Rudoph Burckhardt and his lifelong friend, poet and dance critic Edwin Denby. Burckhardt arrived in New York in 1935 from Switzerland and became immersed in the city’s avant-garde circles. Denby introduced him to several artists, including Willem de Kooning, John Ashbery, and Frank O’Hara.

Burckhardt was fascinated by the undeveloped and industrial districts of Queens and saw them as a chance to escape the intensity of Manhattan. The original unpublished album featured in the exhibition is the third of three monumental albums he and Denby produced together. The first, “New York, N. Why?” (1939) is in the holdings of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, while the second, “An Afternoon in Astoria” (1940), is in the Museum of Modern Art’s collection.

Location: Bruce Silverstein Gallery, 529 West 20th Street, 3rd Floor
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

Thursday, September 14–Saturday, October 28

David Salle. Courtesy of Skarsted.

David Salle. Courtesy of Skarsted.

9. “David Salle: Ham and Cheese and Other Paintings” at Skarstedt
In his newest works, David Salle expands on his “Early Product Paintings,” made in 1993 using collaged advertisements as a support. The works are at once familiar, featuring vintage ads from the 1960s, and delightfully surreal, bizarrely combining images to create strange yet pleasing compositions. The paintings showcase the artist’s mastery of color and line, as well as Salle’s embrace of new techniques, such as frottage, and new materials, including a French matte paint called Flashe.

Location: Skarstedt, 20 East 79th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Friday, 9:30 a.m.–6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Jeff Sonhouse, <i>No Stones in My Path</i> (2017). Courtesy the artist and Tilton Gallery.

Jeff Sonhouse, No Stones in My Path (2017). Courtesy the artist and Tilton Gallery.

10. “Jeff Sonhouse: Masked Reduction” at Tilton Gallery
In his fourth solo show with the gallery, Jeff Sonhouse presents a new body of work that continues his exploration of the African American male portrait. Sonhouse takes inspiration from a range of media images, while mining the history of portraiture—a unique visual language he has honed over time.

Location: Tilton Gallery, 8 East 76th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

Friday, September 15–Saturday, November 18

Devin Allen. Courtesy of the Gordon Parks Foundation.

Devin Allen. Courtesy of the Gordon Parks Foundation.

11. “Devin Allen: A Beautiful Ghetto” at Gordon Parks Foundation
Following the death of Freddie Gray at the hands of Baltimore police in 2015, Gordon Park Foundation fellow Devin Allen photographed the protests that erupted on the streets of his hometown. One of the images was published on the cover of Time magazine, which had only twice before featured an amateur’s work. “A Beautiful Ghetto” showcases Allen’s photographic documentation of Baltimore and its community during the aftermath of Gray’s death.

Location: Gordon Parks Foundation, 48 Wheeler Avenue, Pleasantville
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Friday, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.–3 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Friday, September 15–Saturday, January 6, 2018

Yohji Yamamoto ensemble, fall/winter 2000. Courtesy of the Museum at FIT.

Yohji Yamamoto ensemble, fall/winter 2000. Courtesy of the Museum at FIT.

12. “Expedition: Fashion from the Extreme” at the Museum at FIT
MIT showcases 70 outfits and accessories from its collection, as well as loans. They’re all inspired by garments designed to function in extreme environments, which have also informed the exhibition displays. Examples include the puffer jacket, designed for extreme mountain climbing, and garments made from high-tech materials such as neoprene and Mylar, developed for use in deep sea exploration and outer space.

Location: Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, Seventh Avenue at 27 Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Ideas City 2015. Courtesy of the New Museum.

Ideas City 2015. Courtesy of the New Museum.

13. “Ideas City: A Daylong Festival Exploring 100 Actions for the Future City at Sara D. Roosevelt Park
After two years on the road in Detroit, Athens, and Arles, Ideas City, the New Museum’s platform envisioning the role of arts and culture in the future of cities, comes back to New York. There will be presentations by socially minded artists including Tania Bruguera, Trevor Paglen, and Mel Chin, as well as a slate of architects, activists, and community builders, all showcasing their innovative ideas.

Location: Sara D. Roosevelt Park, Chrystie Street and Forsyth Street
Price: Free
Time: 10 a.m.–7 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

A.R.M. Performance Group. Photo: Courtesy of A.R.M. via the Whitney Museum.

A.R.M. Performance Group. Photo: Courtesy of A.R.M. via the Whitney Museum.

14. “Poses: A Performance by A.R.M” at Whitney Museum of American Art
The Whitney hosts a performance by A.R.M., a collaboration between artists Alexandro Segade, Robert Acklen-Brečko,​ and Malik Gaines. Inspired by the photography of artist collective PaJaMa (Paul Cadmus, Jared French, Margaret French), the artists of A.R.M. will mimic poses seen from photographs, showing visitors alternative ways to connect with the artwork.

Location: 99 Gansevoort Street
Price: Free with Museum Admission
Time: 6 p.m.–9 p.m.

—Eleonore Marie Stifter

Saturday, September 16–Sunday, September 17

Diana Corvell. For "Single Fare 4." Courtesy of the New York Academy of Art.

Diana Corvell. For “Single Fare 4.” Courtesy of the New York Academy of Art.

15. “Single Fare 4” at Highline Stages
New Yorkers have an intense, love-hate relationship with the city’s much-maligned public transportation system, so the results are sure to be exciting when artists are asked to turn to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority for inspiration. For the fourth edition of its open-call “Single Fare” exhibition, created by Michael Kagan and Jean-Pierre Roy in 2010, the Alumni Association of the New York Academy of Art solicited work created using a single Metrocard or train ticket. You can buy any of the 7,000 pieces on view for just $115—although if you want first pick, during the first hour of the opening, you pay a $100 premium.

Location: Highline Stages, 441 West 14th Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 5 p.m.–8 p.m.; Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone


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