Fat Cats Posed In Botticelli, Klimt, and Other Classical Paintings Go Viral

Damien Hirst’s The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living , now with bonus catnap.
Sandro Botticelli's The Birth of Venus plus one feline. Photo via Fat Cat Art

Sandro Botticelli, The Birth of Venus (1482–85) plus one feline.
Photo via: Fat Cat Art.

Two of the Internet’s biggest phenomena—kitties and inserting various people and things into famous works of art—have finally come together to form what can only be referred to as an ultra-viral uber-meme.

The Daily Mail has the scoop on Russian artist Svetlana Petrova who has “improved” paintings like Botticelli‘s The Birth of Venus, Michelangelo‘s The Creation of Adam, and even Da Vinci‘s Mona Lisa with the insertion of her pleasantly plump tabby cat Zarathustra.

Gustav Klimt's The Kiss with kitty.

Gustav Klimt, The Kiss (1907–08) with kitty.
Photo via: Fat Cat Art

Petrova’s website, Fat Cat Art, also has an homage to Charlie Hebdo, a tutorial on “how to take a museum selfie with a fat cat” in honor of Museum Selfie Day (see Did You Know It’s Museum Selfie Day?), as well as dozens of other riffs on modern, Renaissance, and Old Master artworks. There’s even a Banksy post. You’re welcome.

Damien Hirst’s The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living , now with bonus catnap.

Damien Hirst, The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living (1991), now with bonus cat nap.
Photo via: Fat Cat Art

 

Michelangelo, The Creation of Adam (1512) is turned into the creation of cat-dam.

Michelangelo, The Creation of Adam (1512) is turned into the creation of cat-dam.
Photo via: Fat Cat Art.

 

Salvador Dalí, The Persistence of Memory(1931) with three felines. Photo: Fat Cat Art

Salvador Dalí, The Persistence of Memory (1931) with three felines.
Photo via: Fat Cat Art


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