From Hélio Oitcica’s Druggy ‘Delirium’ to Jane Austen’s Delicious Diss: The Best and Worst of the Art World This Week

See what you missed.

Installation view of "To Organize Delirium" at the Carnegie Museum of Art. Image: Ben Davis.

BEST

The Dallas Museum of Art wins this week; they kicked it off with a possibly world record-setting gathering of Frida Kahlo lookalikes. Later in the week, it was reported that the Texas-based institution had nabbed one of the coveted Yayoi Kusama Pumpkin-Themed Infinity Rooms.

Dia expands its repertoire with works by artists Lee Ufan and Kishio Suga.

Shining a light into the caves: UNESCO added six caves containing some of the world’s oldest art to its World Heritage List.

Brazilian artist Hélio Oitcica, the subject of a new retrospective at the Whitney, viewed his cocaine-dealing as an aesthetic statement. artnet News’s Ben Davis reviews the delirious new show.

Jane throws shade: a letter penned by Jane Austen dissing another writer’s work sold for more than $200,000 at Sotheby’s auction in London.

The father of surrealism will rise again! Dali’s body is set to be exhumed on July 20th, after a woman claiming to be the artist’s daughter was granted a court order.

Frida Kahlo lookalikes at the Guinness Book of World Records attempt at the Dallas Museum of Art. Courtesy of Christina Childress Photography.

Frida Kahlo lookalikes at the Guinness Book of World Records attempt at the Dallas Museum of Art. Courtesy of Christina Childress Photography.

WORST

Glafira Rosales was ordered to pay a whopping $81 million to victims of the Knoedler art-fraud scheme.

A disturbing video surfaced from artist Zanele Muholi, who documented her friend being pushed down a flight of stairs by an Airbnb host.

Bushwick Beats? These graffiti artists say that designer Vince Camuto’s new campaign is more like Bushwick Cheats.

Artificial Intelligence, indeed. Abstract art is apparently more “human” when computers create it.

There’s a pretty strange reason why Generation X author Douglas Coupland created a sculpture of van Gogh’s head for a Canadian vineyard.

A still from Vince Camuto’s website featuring street, art now at the heart of a lawsuit brought by the graffiti artists.


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