Guinness Book of Records Won’t Send Judge to Israel for 15 Ton Hummus Plate Record Attempt

From the film
From the film "Hummus." Photo: courtesy Oren Rosenfeld
Photo: courtesy Oren Rosenfeld

From the film “Hummus.”
Photo: Courtesy Oren Rosenfeld

Israeli filmmaker Oren Rosenfeld did not expect the response he’d received from the Guinness World Records office when he planned a neat publicity stunt to roll out his upcoming film, Hummus.

Rosenfeld wanted to set a new record for the largest bowl of hummus ever served. “As part of the film’s PR, I wanted to break the Guinness record, to create a plate with 15 tons of hummus and have all the characters from the film participate in the event,” he told Ynet News.

From the film "Hummus." Photo: courtesy Oren Rosenfeld

From the film “Hummus.” Photo: courtesy Oren Rosenfeld

But when he invited the Guinness World Records office to adjudicate, they claimed it was too dangerous to send a judge to Israel.

Rosenfeld suggested different locations in Israel for the event, but claimed that “even before I filled in the form, they told me that the chance they would send someone here was slim, but that they would anyway pass it on to their security representative.”

Israel previously held the world record for the largest plate of hummus, but lost it to Lebanon in 2010 for a creamy batch weighing about 11.5 tons. “The goal is to break the record held by Lebanon,” Rosenfeld said.

From the film "Hummus." Photo: courtesy Oren Rosenfeld

From the film “Hummus.” Photo: courtesy Oren Rosenfeld

The refusal to send a judge to Israel for security reasons has attracted criticism in Israeli media and comments about other destinations in the Middle East deemed safe for Guinness judges to visit.

“So far no comment from Guinness,” Rosenfeld told artnet News. “They still refuse to send an ajudicator here on grounds of danger despite sending one to Saudi Arabia on July 7. Saudi is now at war with Yemen,” the director pointed out.

But he remains positive. “I’m hopeful that they will re-check with their security advisor and do come here. This film is about food and fun … not about politics and war,” he added.

From the film "Hummus." Photo: courtesy Oren Rosenfeld

From the film “Hummus.”
Photo: Courtesy Oren Rosenfeld

The premise of the film is inclusive. “Hummus is a simple food claimed by all and owned by none; my film features a Jewish man, a Christian Arab, and Muslim women all living in Israel and living off the love of hummus,” he explained.

“Hummus brings people together and peace is what we all want here. The Guinness world record was a means to showcase and promote the film and peace,” he added.


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