Painter Jason Martin Found Hope During Lockdown by Creating Sculptural, Color-Saturated New Paintings—See Images Here

Take a peek at one of summer's most colorful exhibitions, at Lisson Gallery Shanghai.

Installation view of Jason Martin's
Installation view of Jason Martin's "Untitled (Ultramarine blue)" (2021). Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Artist Jason Martin’s work has long captured the attention of viewers for the almost sculptural effect produced by the painter’s thick strokes of impasto. Each of his horizontal bands, which mimic the effect of canyon striations, challenge one’s perception of dimensionality by appearing to reach beyond the plane of the work itself. 

While Martin, who studied at Goldsmith’s College in London in the early 1990s, has in past exhibitions adhered to more neutral color palettes in order to emphasize his work’s textural scapes, he is exploring bold new territory now, as illustrated in his latest show, “Space, Light, Time” at Lisson Gallery Shanghai, which opened earlier this month and is on view through late August.

The work marks an exciting new chapter for the artist, who sought to return to the fundamentals of painting while in his studio in Portugal during much of 2020. It consists of a series of bold new shapes and bolder colors, partly inspired by Yves Klein and Lucio Fontanatwo artists who played a key role in this shift for the artist.

In the space, Martin’s round works in oriental blue and cobalt violet assume center stage on the gallery’s first and second walls, while further back in the later rooms, one can see an ultramarine blue tondo followed by a series of neon pink and scarlet canvases. The works, the gallery notes, “illustrate the core of Martin’s practice, yet [also] depict the ever-evolving pursuit of an artist exploring new and unique ways to handle the medium and the scenes that emerge.”

In many ways, Martin’s hypnotic, colorful forms emit a more energetic, joyful sense of aliveness than his previous work, employing for the first time, too, mirrored surfaces using metallics like gold, silver, copper, and nickel in some of the works. All are meant to inspire, according to the gallery, “a desire to escape the melancholy and start anew.”

To view Martin’s works, check out images of the show below and on the gallery’s website

Installation view of Jason Martin's "Space, Light, Time" at Lisson Gallery. Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Jason Martin’s “Space, Light, Time” at Lisson Gallery. Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Jason Martin's "Space, Light, Time" at Lisson Gallery Shanghai. Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Jason Martin’s “Space, Light, Time” at Lisson Gallery Shanghai. Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

James Martin, "Untitled (Quinacridone scarlet)" (2021). Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

James Martin, Untitled (Quinacridone scarlet) (2021). Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Jason Martin's "Untitled (Fluorescent pink / Titanium white)" (2021). Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Jason Martin’s Untitled (Fluorescent pink / Titanium white) (2021). Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

A closeup of Jason Martin’s Untitled (Fluorescent flame red / Rosso laccato) (2021). Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Jason Martin, Untitled (Ultramarine blue) (2021). Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Jason Martin, "Untitled (Ultramarine blue)" (2021). Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Jason Martin, Untitled (Ultramarine blue) (2021). Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Jason Martin, Untitled (Cobalt violet) (2021). Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Jason Martin, "Untitled (Permanent red)" (2021). Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Jason Martin, Untitled (Permanent red) (2021). Photo courtesy Lisson Gallery.


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