Johnny Depp in Search of New Agent After ‘Mortdecai’ Bombs

Johnny Depp in Mortdecai. Photo: David Appleby, courtesy PR.
Johnny Depp in Mortdecai. Photo: David Appleby, courtesy PR.

Johnny Depp’s most recent flick, art heist caper film Mortdecai, is only the latest in a string of high-profile flops for the 51-year-old actor. To stop the skid, Depp may be about to ditch his agent, Tracey Jacobs, who has represented him since 1988, according to Page Six.

Skewered by critics, with a lowly 12 percent freshness rating on review aggregate site Rotten Tomatoes (see Johnny Depp’s Mortdecai Bombs with Critics), Mortdecai also bombed at the box office this weekend, raking in a mere $4.2 million. Excepting Depp’s small role in Into the Woods, which opened on Christmas Day, this is his fifth consecutive commercial failure, following Transcendence (2014), The Lone Ranger (2013), Dark Shadows (2012), and The Rum Diary (2011).

Perhaps in response to articles like “After mortifying Mortdecai, is Johnny Depp’s career decaying?,” Depp has reportedly approached Rick Yorn, who manages Scarlett Johansson and Leonardo DiCaprio. The actor’s spokesperson, Robin Baum, denied the report to Page Six, saying, “This is not correct information . . . this is not true.” Nevertheless, speculation continues to abound, with sources suggesting that Yorn could join Depp’s team as a manager, with Jacobs staying on as his agent.

Depp is still busy promoting the reviled Mortdecai, which will be released in Japan on February 6 (see Here’s the First Trailer for Johnny Depp Art Heist Movie Mortdecai and Johnny Depp to Play Art Dealer Hunting Nazi Loot Opposite Gwyneth Paltrow). Understandably, the actor seemed reluctant to do so, skipping out on a scheduled press conference on Tuesday. Earlier this morning, Depp attributed yesterday’s absence to a chupacabra, a mythical bloodsucking South American beast he claimed was hiding in his suitcase. He told the AP that “I was attacked yesterday morning . . . I fought with it for hours. They’re very persistent, very mean. . . . Thank you for understanding.”


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