Koons Purses and Hirst Jewelry in Our Last-Minute Holiday Gift Guide

An uber-artsy last-minute gift guide. You're welcome.

Behind on your holiday shopping? artnet News is here to help, with a last-minute guide to all our favorite art-related gifts.

Glenn Ligon's MZ Wallace Metro Tote, based on his painting Untitled (I Am Somebody), to benefit the Studio Museum in Harlem. Photo: MZ Wallace.

Glenn Ligon’s MZ Wallace Metro Tote, based on his painting Untitled (I Am Somebody), to benefit the Studio Museum in Harlem.
Photo: MZ Wallace.

Glenn Ligon‘s limited-edition tote bag, sold at the Studio Museum in Harlem, covers all the bases: art, fashion, and philanthropy. A collaboration with designer handbag maker MZ Wallace, the artist’s take on the oh-so-stylish quilted Metro Tote features a print based on his painting Untitled (I Am Somebody). Proceeds from the bags’ sales will go toward the youth education program at the museum (see “Glenn Ligon Designs Handbag for Studio Museum in Harlem“).
MZ Wallace Glenn Ligon Tote, $225.

Damien Hirst, Pill Rosary, the Cathedral Collection. Photo: Damien Hirst and Other Criteria.

Damien Hirst, Pill Rosary, the Cathedral Collection.
Photo: Damien Hirst and Other Criteria.

For those with more luxurious tastes, you can always turn to Damien Hirst. The British artist unveiled a new line of shiny gold jewelry inspired by his popular “Medicine Cabinet” sculpture series (see “Damien Hirst Unveils Collection of Pill-Shaped Jewelry“). Say your prayers at the joint altars of prescription drugs and high-end fashion with Hirst’s Pill Rosary, which subs in a cracked open medicinal capsule for the Crucifix. Featuring rubies and black and white diamonds, the $68,000 accessory is matched with a somewhat-more-affordable ring ($28,000).
Both pieces in Hirst’s Cathedral Collection are being sold in a limited edition of 25, and can be ordered in 18 karat yellow, white, or rose gold.

 

Jeff Koons, Balloon Dog purse for H&M. Photo: courtesy H&M.

Jeff Koons, Balloon Dog purse for H&M.
Photo: courtesy H&M.

You may have to turn to eBay to get your hands on the popular limited-edition Jeff Koons leather handbag produced by H&M earlier this year (see “H&M Peddling Jeff Koons-Branded Clutches“), but the Balloon Dog (Yellow) emblazoned tote is definitely the most fashionable way to reference one of the year’s most memorable exhibitions (and the last to be held at New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art). Plus, even though it’s sold out, finding the Koons purse is still easier than buying your loved ones a $650 Chinese-produced knock-off of the sculpture (see “Chinese Jeff Koons Knock-Offs Are Increasingly Sophisticated“).
Jeff Koons Handbag by H&M, from $175 on eBay. 

 

Prince

Richard Prince, Portrait of NightCoreGirl, ink jet on canvas, 48×58, (2014)
Photo: Screenshot from richardprince4’s Instagram.

An offbeat online holiday shop from artist duo Jen Catron and Paul Outlaw offers a line of satirical art objects. Get your art world insider friends their own miniature Jordan Wolfson animatronic doll (see “Say Hello to Jordan Wolfson’s Terrifying Animatronic Dancer at David Zwirner“), or a Chinatown knock-off of the aforementioned Jeff Koons/H&M collaboration. Do you miss Oscar Murillo‘s much-maligned chocolate factory (see “Will Oscar Murillo’s Colombian Chocolate Factory Stunt Damage David Zwirner’s Brand?“)? Catron and Outlaw snagged the last crate of candy, and are selling them at $20 a pop. You can also pick up Terry Richardson condoms (“no means art”), Miley Cyrus’s Dirty Hippie Art Set (see “Miley Cyrus Makes Erotic Sculptures“), and editioned Richard Prince Instagram prints (see “Richard Prince Is Selling Conceptual Instagram Art at Gagosian“) signed by the duo.
Jen and Paul Bus Tours, various items, $9.99–99.99.

 

Olafur Eliasson, Little Sun Solar Lamp.

Olafur Eliasson, Little Sun Solar Lamp (2014). Photo: Give Good Art by ForYourArt.

Looking to spread environmental awareness along with your holiday cheer? Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson has created a cute sun-shaped solar-powered lamp in conjunction with engineer Frederic Ottesen. The Little Sun Solar Lamp is being distributed in off-the-grid regions of the world at locally affordable prices. Purchasing the lamp in places that do have electricity makes it more widely available for those who need it, helping to integrate poorer areas with the global community.  
Olafur Eliasson solar lamp, $30.

 

The logo for Cory Arcangel's Arcangel Surfware merchandise line.

The logo for Cory Arcangel’s Arcangel Surfware merchandise line.

For your homebody, Internet-obsessed friends, artist Cory Arcangel has you covered with his exclusive lifestyle and clothing line, Arcangel Surfware, designed to outfit web surfers for a lazy weekend in bed with their laptop (see “Cory Arcangel Pop-Up Store Sells Everything You Need to Chill in Bed“). A set of luridly colored “Photoshop Gradient Demonstration Sheets” will brighten up the bedroom for $495.95, while a pair of white sweatpants with “Arcangel” printed down the right leg in the same rainbow shades will run you only $59.95.
Various items, $19.95–495.95.

 

Chris Bokay, Realism, the anti-smart phone device.

Chris Bokay, Realism, the anti-smart phone device.

Conversely, would you like to unplug for the holidays? Consider the Realism Smart Device, a plastic rectangular frame from artist Chris Bokay that allows you to look at the world afresh, minus your iPhone. This anti-smart phone lets you power down and participate in life first hand, without any digital barriers. artnet News encountered the device during Art Basel, at the Shelborne Wyndham Grand. There, paired with Rachel Lee Hovnanian’s poignant sculpture Who Needs Teddy When You’ve Got a Smart Phone, the work’s title written behind a towering pile of stuffed bears, one hung from above by a noose, Realism served as a powerful reminder that there’s more to life than a social media presence. Don’t we all know someone who could stand to learn that lesson this Christmas?
Realism, the anti-smart phone, $24.95 in black, clear, red, or white. 

 

Yayoi Kusama, <em>Hi, Konnichiwa</em> (2014), available at David Zwirner, New York.

Yayoi Kusama, Hi, Konnichiwa (2014), available at David Zwirner, New York.

Book lovers engage: David Zwirner is hosting its first annual holiday pop-up book store, with special offers on a selection of recent publications on an impressive array of artists including Jeff Koons, Yayoi Kusama, Blinky Palermo, and Raymond Pettibon. A classy coffee table book is always a solid option if you’re lacking gift-giving inspiration, and Zwirner’s stock, available at the gallery’s 525 West 19th Street location, is sure to fit the bill.
Art books for sale from $5–100, with most books at about $50. Limited numbers of more expensive publications are available from $500–4,000.

 

Andy Warhol-themed sunglasses from RETROSUPERFUTURE. Photo: courtesy RETROSUPERFUTURE.

Andy Warhol–themed sunglasses from RETROSUPERFUTURE. Photo: courtesy RETROSUPERFUTURE.

It may be winter here in New York, but in the aftermath of a blizzard, your loved ones will be thankful for a pair of Andy Warhol shades to block the blinding glare of the sun hitting those sparkling snow drifts—or to wear on the beach during their holiday getaway. The “Self Portraits Collection,” produced by Italian sunglasses manufacturer RETROSUPERFUTURE and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, are decorated with a collage of photo booth self-portraits of the Pop artist, and come in four fun frame silhouettes (see “Hot Selfie Accessory for Summer: Official Andy Warhol Sunglasses“).
Official Andy Warhol-branded sunglasses, $245 a pair.

 

Leonardo da Vinci, "Mona Lisa" (1503–1517)

Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa (1503–17).
Photo: Wikipedia Commons.

With all the breaking Leonardo da Vinci news of late (see “Was the Mona Lisa Leonardo’s Mother and a Chinese Slave?,” “Did Leonardo da Vinci Paint the Mona Lisa Twice?,” and “Authenticity of Leonardo’s Virgin of the Rocks Under Scrutiny“), interest in the Renaissance master who inspired the Dan Brown best seller is at a peak. In that vein, a new book by Leonard Shlain, Leonardo’s Brain: Understanding da Vinci’s Creative Genius, takes a new, scientific approach to the artist and scientist’s life and career, analyzing da Vinci’s genius using left-right brain scientific research.
Leonard Shlain’s Leonardo’s Brain: Understanding da Vinci’s Creative Genius, $19.68 hardcover.

 

David Irvine, "Re-Directed Art." Photo: Gnarled Branch.

David Irvine, “Re-Directed Art.” Photo: Gnarled Branch.

If you want an original work of art that blends traditional landscapes with modern pop culture references, illustrator David Irvine’s nerdy take on appropriation art, or “Re-Directed Art,” as he calls it, may be just the ticket (see “Artist Transforms Thrift Shop Paintings Into Nerdy Masterpieces“). Old prints, paintings, and lithographs found at thrift stores and garage sale are reborn thanks to Irvine’s ability to seamlessly integrate beloved characters like the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man within bucolic country landscapes.
David Irvine’s “Re-Directed Art” is available on Etsy, Society6, and Redbubble, from $22–26.

 

Title page of the NYC Transit Authority Graphics Standards Manual (1970), by Unimark's Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noorda. Photo: Jesse Reed and Hamish Smyth.

Title page of the NYC Transit Authority Graphics Standards Manual (1970), by Unimark’s Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noorda.
Photo: Jesse Reed and Hamish Smyth.

You had to think ahead on this one, but if you had the foresight to chip in towards the Kickstarter campaign to republish a Massimo Vignelli‘s NYC Transit Authority Graphics Standards Manual (1970), you’re guaranteed to make the graphic-design maven on your list one extremely happy typography geek (see “Kickstarter Project to Reissue Massimo Vignelli’s Masterpiece“). The long-lost, massive 7-pound book details the Vignelli- and Bob Noorda–designed hierarchy of text and design that still in large part sets the standard for the New York City subway system’s signage. If you missed the campaign, there’s always the online version at TheStandardsManual.com.
Kickstarter prices for the reprint of Massimo Vignelli’s NYC Transit Authority Graphics Standards Manual ranged from $98–188, based on early backer status and international shipping rates.

 

Some of the products in the Kickstarter@MoMAStore collection, including "The Present," a rainbow-hued year-long clock by Scott Thrift. Photo: courtesy MoMa Design Store, New York.

Some of the products in the [email protected] collection, including the Present, a rainbow-hued year-long clock by Scott Thrift.
Photo: courtesy MoMa Design Store, New York.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, New York’s Museum of Modern Art has a multitude of gift options for the art-loving crowd, thanks to a couple of unorthodox partnerships. The MoMA Design Store offers a slew of innovative products sourced from Kickstarter (see “MoMA and Kickstarter Launch New Design Store Collection“), including a 3-D pen (see “New 3-D Printing Pen Will Let Artists Draw in Mid-Air“) and the Lumio Book Lamp, an innocuous-looking hardcover that opens to reveal an accordion-like illumination device. On the art and fashion front, MoMA also has you covered with its Uniqlo SPRZ NY line, an assortment of clothing emblazoned with artworks from the museum’s collection by such artists as Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jenny Holzer (see “MoMA Licenses Warhol, Pollock, and Basquiat for Uniqlo’s Newest Fashion Line“).
Kickstarter design products, $10–599. Uniqlo clothing, $4.90–49.90.

 

Francisco Estebanez, Frida Kahlo Paper Dolls. Photo: courtesy Chronicle Books.

Francisco Estebanez, Frida Kahlo Paper Dolls.
Photo: courtesy Chronicle Books.

If you’re looking to spark a love of art history in the little girl in your family, may we suggest a book of Frida Kahlo paper dolls (see “Frida Kahlo, James Franco and Leonardo da Vinci Make For Adorable Paper Dolls“)? Francisco Estebanez’s Frida Kahlo Paper Dolls comes with 30 outfits for the pioneering female artist, plus a bonus doll featuring her husband, muralist Diego Rivera. Dress up Kahlo in her signature traditional Mexican garb, or, if you prefer, in a business suit.
Frida Kahlo Paper Dolls, $9.95.

 

Postalco's Alexander Calder line at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, New York. Photo: courtesy Postalco.

Postalco’s Alexander Calder line at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, New York.
Photo: courtesy Postalco.

The newly reopened Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum (see “Revamped Cooper Hewitt Museum Debuts“) is a big upgrade on the old museum, but don’t let all the bells and whistles distract you from the gift shop. Highlights there include a collection from Tokyo-based stationer Postalco of embossed goatskin and pressed-canvas wallets and notebooks featuring sketches and notes by Alexander Calder, created in partnership with the Calder Foundation.
Alexander Calder Postalco accessories, $22–50.

 

MarieBelle hand-painted chocolate ganache candies. Photo: Sarah Cascone.

MarieBelle hand-painted chocolate ganache candies.
Photo: Sarah Cascone.

Who says chocolate can’t be a work of art? At MarieBelle Fine Chocolates in SoHo, you can pick up a veritable jewel-box of flavored chocolates, and each delicious, ganache-filled candy is carefully painted with a delightful holiday scene. They’re almost too pretty to eat, but once you give in to temptation, they’ll be gone in no time. You can order online, but if you visit the gorgeously appointed SoHo store, treat yourself to a cup of the rich, chipotle chile-spiked hot chocolate. 
MarieBelle’s signature chocolate ganache tote boxes, $16–260.

 

Rob Pruitt x J Brand

Rob Pruitt x J Brand.

In another art and fashion mash-up, artist Rob Pruitt has translated his signature rainbow gradients into a line denim clothing produced by J Brand and sold at Barneys in partnership with Leitzes & Co (see “Rob Pruitt’s Gradients Go High Fashion for J Brand Jeans“). The best part of about these gorgeous multi-hued creations is that Pruitt’s gone equal-opportunity, creating a matching set of both men’s and women’s wear—although there are twice as many color options in the skinny jeans for ladies.
J Brand Rob Pruitt jeans for $325, jacket for $895.

 

Owen Schmit , <em>Moonburn</em> (2014), for the Posters.

Owen Schmit, Moonburn (2014), for the Posters.

No gift guide would be complete without some affordable art. Enter The Posters, a new e-commerce company that sells beautifully-printed original lithography to support urban arts education programs, with the goal of funding a million hours of classes by 2016. Launched during this year’s Art Basel, the initial batch of four works are from Nate Lowman, Owen Schmit, Paul Wackers, and Wyatt Kahn, and will benefit Los Angeles’s Inner-City Arts. While not released in editions, each work is available for only a limited time, so act fast.
The Posters, $55.


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