National Gallery of Art Acquires Thousands of Works From the Corcoran Collection

The National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.Photo via: Wikipedia
The National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.
Photo via: Wikipedia

The National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. (NGA) has announced the acquisition of 6,430 artworks from the Corcoran Gallery of Art’s collection, out of the 17,000 pieces that are currently in the NGA’s custody .

The announcement comes in the aftermath of a bitter legal battle to save the financially struggling Corcoran Gallery from its dissolution as an independent entity, and a joint take over by the NGA and the George Washington University (see Corcoran Gallery Finalizes Deal With National Gallery and GWU and Fight to Save the Corcoran Heads to Court).

But the collective “Save the Corcoran” lost the case in court and the historical museum closed its doors in  September 2014 (see Judge Approves Dissolution of Corcoran Gallery and Fake Funeral for Corcoran Gallery).

“Our selection of works is based on criteria such as aesthetic considerations, art historical importance, and relevance to the areas in which we collect,” Franklin Kelly, deputy director and chief curator at the NGA, explained in a statement. “The acquisitions range widely, filling gaps, and delivering significant depth and breadth. As the review of the Corcoran collection continues, we are only beginning to realize the many ways in which the Gallery will be able to tell a more comprehensive narrative of American and European art history.”

“This is an historic moment for the National Gallery of Art, which has an important responsibility as a steward of the renowned Corcoran collection,” Earl A. Powell III, director of the NGA, added. “We look forward to bringing this art to a larger audience, creating myriad new experiences for learning and enjoyment.”


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