New York Museum Shows to Get Excited About in 2017

Highlights range from Robert Rauschenberg to Florine Stettheimer.

Jane Wilson, Portrait of Jane Freilicher, 1957. Oil on canvas, 36 x 24 in. Collection of John Gruen and Julia Gruen, New York. © Estate of Jane Wilson. Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
Jane Wilson, Portrait of Jane Freilicher, 1957. Collection of John Gruen and Julia Gruen, New York. © Estate of Jane Wilson. Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York

Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952–1965” at Grey Art Gallery, New York University, January 10–April 1, 2017
An homage to the role of alternative spaces in the ecology of New York art, from the network of cooperative 10th Street galleries to the politicized art spaces of the early ’60s.

Joiri Minaya, Siboney (still) (2015). Courtesy of the artist.

Joiri Minaya, Siboney (still) (2015). Courtesy of the artist.

Rotative Repository of Latin American Video Art: Mono Canal” at El Museo del Barrio, January 11–April 30, 2017
Single-channel video art from across Latin-America, from an interesting cast of artists, both new and well-known: Maricruz Alarcón, Francisca Benitez, Alberto Borea, Nat Castañeda, Javier Castro, Lionel Cruet, Marcos Chaves, Gianfranco Foschino, Ignacio Gatica, Eduardo Gil, Alfredo Jaar, Joiri Minaya, Iván Navarro, Crack Rodriguez, and Margarita Sanchez.

Marisa Merz, <em>Untitled</em> (2010). Image courtesy Hammer Museum.

Marisa Merz, Untitled (2010). Image courtesy Hammer Museum.

Marisa Merz: The Sky Is a Great Space” at the Met Breuer, January 24–May 7, 2017
Five decades of work from Marisa Merz, one of the most famous artists associated with Italy’s Arte Povera movement—and its only woman.

ISIS distributes school supplies to girls in Mosul, Iraq. (2015 video). Image courtesy ICP.

ISIS distributes school supplies to girls in Mosul, Iraq. (2015 video). Image courtesy ICP.

Perpetual Revolution: The Image and Social Change” at the International Center of Photography, January 27–May 7, 2017
A deep dive, in exhibition form, into the ways that the momentous political events of the last few years have interacted with a mutating photographic culture, organized around five thematic threads: #BlackLivesMatter, gender fluidity, climate change, terrorist propaganda, and the refugee crisis.

François Boucher (1703–1770), The Triumph of Venus, 1740. Oil on canvas, 130 x 162 cm. Nationalmuseum, Stockholm.

François Boucher, The Triumph of Venus (1740). Image courtesy Nationalmuseum, Stockholm.

Treasures from the Nationalmuseum of Sweden: The Collections of Count Tessin” at the Morgan Library & Museum, February 3–May 14, 2017
Sweden’s largest museum tours a trove of ravishing material to NYC, including Boucher’s febrile Triumph of Venus (above) and a large number of Old Master drawings.

David Gaussoin and Wayne Nez Gaussoin (Diné [Navajo]/ Picuris Pueblo), Postmodern Boa, 2009. Stainless steel, sterling silver, enamel paint, and feathers. Courtesy of David Gaussoin and the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. Model: Tazbah Gaussoin.

David Gaussoin and Wayne Nez Gaussoin (Diné [Navajo]/ Picuris Pueblo), Postmodern Boa (2009). Image courtesy of David Gaussoin and the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. Model: Tazbah Gaussoin.

Native Fashion Now” at the National Museum of the American Indian, February 17, 2017–September 4, 2017
Originating at the Peabody Essex Museum, this exhibition showcases a half-century’s worth of creativity from Native fashion designers and artists.

Georges Seurat, Circus Sideshow (1887–88). Image courtesy Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Georges Seurat, Circus Sideshow (1887–88). Image courtesy Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Seurat’s Circus Sideshow” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, February 17–May 29, 2017
Centering on the Met’s star Seurat, Circus Sideshow (above), this show gathers related works by the Pointillist, plus a broad array of works by contemporaries and disciples, documentary material, and even period music instruments, adding up to an argument about the importance of the travelling circus in the modernist imagination.

J. M. W. Turner, Cologne: The Arrival of a Packet-Boat: Evening, exhibited 1826, oil on canvas, 66 3/8 x 88 ¼ inches, The Frick Collection

J. M. W. Turner, Cologne: The Arrival of a Packet-Boat: Evening, exhibited 1826. image courtesy the Frick Collection

Turner’s Modern and Ancient Ports: Passages through Time” at the Frick Collection, February 23–May 14, 2017
This exhibition sets a course through the deep waters of Turner’s oeuvre, with his love of ports as its guiding star.

Catalog for Georgia O'Keeffe: Living Modern.

Catalog for Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern.

Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern” at the Brooklyn Museum, March 3–July 23, 2017
A fresh look at Georgia O’Keeffe, featuring some paintings but with an eye to celebrating her style via displays of clothing and a selection of photographic portraits, emphasizing her carefully crafted public image.

Christopher Y. Lew and Mia Locks. Photograph by Scott Rudd © 2016

Christopher Y. Lew and Mia Locks. Photograph by Scott Rudd © 2016.

Whitney Biennial 2017” at the Whitney Museum of American Art, March 17–June 11, 2017
For the Whitney’s signature event, curators Christopher Y. Lew and Mia Locks have cooked up a survey that promises to look both inward (to the theme of “formation of self”) and outward (to the theme of “the individual’s place in a turbulent society.”) It has an intriguing list of artists, and should, as always, be the talk of the town.

Doug Wheeler PSAD Synthetic Desert III, 1971 (detail). Ink on paper, 61.1 x 91.4 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Panza Collection, Gift, 1991 © Doug Wheeler

Doug Wheeler, PSAD Synthetic Desert III (detail) (1971). Image courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum © Doug Wheeler.

Doug Wheeler: PSAD Synthetic Desert III, 1971” at the Guggenheim, March 24–August 2017
The Guggenheim promises the first IRL realization of a long-percolating series of proposition by Light and Space pioneer Doug Wheeler, transforming one of the museum’s Tower Galleries into a “semi-anechoic chamber.”

Marinella Senatore, Modica Street Musical: The Past, The Present and The Possible, 2016. Performance view, Modica, Sicily

Marinella Senatore, Modica Street Musical: The Past, The Present and The Possible, 2016. Performance view, Modica, Sicily.

Marinella Senatore: Recent Work” at the Queens Museum of Art, April 9–July 30, 2017
Senatore (b. 1977) is known for public art that functions at community scale, engaging “the creative power of crowds.” The exact details of the Queens Museum show remain obscure, but it promises both a retrospective and new work.  

Louise Lawler. Big (adjusted to fit). 2002/2003/2016. Adhesive wall material, dimensions variable. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Acquired through the generosity of The Modern Women’s Fund and The Contemporary Arts Council. © 2016 Louise Lawler

Louise Lawler. Big (adjusted to fit). 2002/2003/2016. Image courtesy Museum of Modern Art © 2016 Louise Lawler

Louise Lawler: WHY PICTURES NOW” at the Museum of Modern Art, April 30–July 30, 2017
Best known for focusing her lens on how art is displayed, Lawler here promises a characteristically bewildering sample of her own work. More a reinterpretation than a retrospective, it includes mural-scale images that have been “adjusted to fit” their space, and black-and-white tracings of past images stuck to the wall as decals.

Florine Stettheimer, Self-Portrait with Paradise Birds (Self-Portrait in Front of Chinese Screen), 1967. Image courtesy Columbia University.

Florine Stettheimer, Self-Portrait with Paradise Birds (Self-Portrait in Front of Chinese Screen), 1967. Image courtesy Columbia University.

Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry” at the Jewish Museum, May 5–September 24, 2017
A full-throated homage to Stettheimer (18711944), featuring her distinctive paintings and drawings alongside theater sets, her poetry, and a variety of ephemera, the exhibition reconstructs the creative ferment around her in Jazz Age New York.

The catalogue for <em>Robert Rauschenberg.</em>

The catalogue for Robert Rauschenberg.

Robert Rauschenberg” at the Museum of Modern Art, May 21–Sept. 17, 2017
The maestro of mixed media gets his due with more than 250 works in all media, plus exhibition design by Charles Atlas meant to foreground the role of dance and choreography in his work. A symphonic experience of the total Rauschenberg.


Follow artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.

Share