18 Things You Should See During New York City’s Print Week 2017

From prints pulled hot off the press to rarely seen Old Master engravings, here is your guide to the best shows and events this weekend.

Tom Hammick's Living Room (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Flowers Gallery.
Tom Hammick's Living Room (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Flowers Gallery.

New York Print Week is always a crowd-pleaser, with emerging artists showing next to Old Masters. Based around the International Fine Print Dealers Association Fair, gallery shows, museum exhibitions, and special events are taking place across the city to celebrate the printmaking community. For those looking to start an art collection, prints are a great way to discover new artists and indulge eclectic tastes. Below, our guide to the most print-eresting events going on this week.

Pablo Picasso's <i>La Minotauromachie</i>. Courtesy of Frederich Mulder.

Pablo Picasso’s La Minotauromachie. Courtesy of Frederick Mulder.

1. International Fine Print Dealers Association (IFPDA) Fine Art Print Fair
The world’s largest art fair dedicated printmaking moves to the Javits Center for its 2017 edition. The 81 exhibitors, all IFPDA members, will showcase everything from Old Masters to contemporary art editions. Expect such gems as the politically themed series by Soledad Salame based on the 2016 Women’s March at Goya Contemporary & Goya-Girl Press; new prints by 2013 Turner Prize-winner Laure Provost at Poligrafa Studio; and Frederick Mulder exhibiting a rare work by Picasso titled La Minotauromachie—believed by many to be a precursor to Guernica, and never released for general sale.

River Pavilion, Javits Center 421 11th Avenue at West 35th Street; October 26–29, 2016. Thursday–Saturday 12 p.m.–8 p.m., Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

Tickets are $20 for daily admission, purchase ahead of time or on site.

Louise Bourgeois, A l'Infini (2008). Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art. ©2017 The Easton Foundation, Licensed by VAGA, NY.

Louise Bourgeois, A l’Infini (2008). Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art. ©2017 The Easton Foundation, Licensed by VAGA, NY.

2. “Louise Bourgeois: An Unfolding Portrait” at the Museum of Modern Art

In a celebration of the printed matter in Louise Bourgeois‘s oeuvre, MoMA is tracing the artist’s creative process through the mediums she chose for each work. The show includes some 300 works including archival material and rarely exhibited objects.

MoMA is located at 11 West 53rd Street; through January 28, 2018; Sunday–Wednesday, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m.–9 p.m.

Louise Bourgeois, <i>Beautiful Night</i> (2004). Courtesy of Carolina Nitsch.

Louise Bourgeois, Beautiful Night (2004). Courtesy of Carolina Nitsch.

3. “Louise Bourgeois: The Fabric Editions” at Carolina Nitsch
A show of the artist’s textile books and fabric-based editions that mine themes of motherhood, femininity, nature, and memory, this is a smaller companion to the big Bourgeois survey on view at MoMA.

534 West 22nd Street; through November 30; Wednesday–Saturday 11 a.m.–5 p.m..

Carol Summers, <i>Kill for Peace, 1967</i> from Artists and Writers Protest Against the War in Vietnam, 1967. Courtesy of the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Carol Summers, Kill for Peace, 1967 from Artists and Writers Protest Against the War in Vietnam, 1967. Courtesy of the Whitney Museum of American Art.

4. “An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1940–2017 at the Whitney Museum

With works from the diverse collection of the Whitney Museum, “An Incomplete History of Protest” looks at artists’ means of engaging with political and social issues through activism, criticism, instruction, and inspiration.

The Whitney is located at 99 Gansevoort Street; Sunday–Thursday, 10:30 a.m.–6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10:30 a.m.–10 p.m.

Robert Longo, Untitled (Raft at Sea) (2017). © Robert Longo, Private European Collection. Photo: Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York.

Robert Longo, Untitled (Raft at Sea) (2017). © Robert Longo, Private European Collection. Photo: Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York.

5. “Proof: Francisco Goya, Sergei Eisenstein, Robert Longo” at the Brooklyn Museum

A visually expansive show that focuses on the work of three artists whose work is “proof” of a public event, a particular action, or a personal response across a broad range of media. )For more insight, artnet News’s Terence Trouillot had a candid conversation with Robert Longo on the occasion of the exhibition opening.)

The Brooklyn Museum is located at 200 Eastern Parkway; through January 7, 2018; Wednesday, Friday–Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m.–10 p.m.

Edward Alexander Wadsworth, <i>Dock Scene</i> (c.1918). Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Edward Alexander Wadsworth, Dock Scene (c.1918). Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

6. “World War I and the Visual Arts” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
To commemorate the anniversary of World War I, this exhibition traces the many ways that the war effort affected an era of artistic expression. The responses range from nationalistic support to staunch resistance illustrated in prints, illustrated books, posters, and other ephemera. Ongoing through January 7.

The Met is located at 1000 Fifth Avenue; through January 7, 2018; Sunday–Wednesday, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m.–9 p.m.

John Baldessari, Hands, Tiger & Teeth (2017). Courtesy of Gemini G.E.L.

7. “John Baldessari: Hands and Feet” at Gemini at Joni Moisant Weyl
Currently on view in the project space at Gemini’s NYC outpost, eight new prints by John Baldessari of… hands and feet.

535 West 24th Street; through November 10; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Sol Lewitt, <i>Horizontal Color Bands and Vertical Color Bands</i> (1991). Courtesy of Pace Prints.

Sol LeWitt, Horizontal Color Bands and Vertical Color Bands (1991). Courtesy of Pace Prints.

8. “Sol Lewitt” at Pace Prints
Opening just in time for Print Week, an expansive view of artist Sol LeWitt‘s work in the print medium, using techniques like aquatint and etching to expand on his conceptual treatises.

521 West 26th Street, 3rd Floor; October 27–December 2; Tuesday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m. 

 

Käthe Kollowitz, <i>Never Again War!</i> (1924). Courtesy of Galerie Saint Etienne.

Käthe Kollwitz, Never Again War! (1924). Courtesy of Galerie Saint Etienne.

9. “All Good Art is Political: Käthe Kollwitz and Sue Coe” at Galerie Saint Etienne
The work of contemporary artist Sue Coe and Russian printmaker Käthe Kollwitz is juxtaposed in this show, illustrating the impact of artists on the way we remember the past and record the present.

24 West 57th Street; October 26, 2017–February 10, 2018; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.

Nuvolo (Giorgio Ascani), <i>Untitled</i> (1960). Courtesy of Di Donna and Collection Renghi, Citta di Castello.

Nuvolo (Giorgio Ascani), Untitled (1960). Courtesy of Di Donna and Collection Renghi, Citta di Castello.

10. “Nuvolo and Post-War Materiality 1950–1965” at Di Donna
A show focusing on the lesser-known figure of Arte Povera, artist Nuvolo (né Giorgio Ascani) curated by historian Germano Celant.

744 Madison AvenueOctober 26, 2017–January 26, 2018; Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; opening reception, Thursday, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.

William Villalongo's <i>Free, Black and All American no. 3</i> (2017). Photo: Argenis Apolinario<br /> Courtesy of Susan Inglett Gallery, NYC.

William Villalongo’s Free, Black and All American no. 3 (2017). Photo: Argenis Apolinario
Courtesy of Susan Inglett Gallery, NYC.

11. “William Villalongo: Keep on Pushing” at Susan Inglett Gallery
William Villalongo’s new body of work is a study of the contested black male body in art history and the culture at large. Although his work highlights the inadequacies of the current social and political climate, the message to “Keep on Pushing” taking its title from the Curtis Mayfield song, remains the most important.

522 West 24th Street; Tuesday–Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; October 26–December 9, 2017; opening reception, Thursday, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.

A Levy's Bakery poster from Poster House, image courtesy of Stephanie Powell.

A Levy’s Bakery poster from Poster House, image courtesy of Stephanie Powell.

12. “Gone Tomorrow: Pop-Up Exhibition” at the Poster House
Extended in honor of Print Week, a space dedicated to the posters of yesteryear, capturing iconic moments in the city’s colorful history.

119 West 23rd Street; through November 1; email [email protected] to schedule a visit between 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Anton Ginzburg, <i>Zaum ESL#6</i> (2017). Courtesy of IPCNY and the artist.

Anton Ginzburg, Zaum ESL#6 (2017). Courtesy of IPCNY and the artist.

13. “Russian Revolution: A Contested Legacy” at the International Print Center New York (IPCNY)
In conjunction with the current show, Russian scholar and show curator Masha Chlenova will deliver the lecture “Embattled Images: Print Culture in the Russian Revolution” about the use of print media during the Russian Revolution, followed by a walkthrough of the show.

Lecture: Friday, October 27. IPCNY is located at 508 West 26th Street, 5A; Tuesday–Saturday 11 a.m.–6 p.m., through December 16.

Kate McCrickard, <i>Untitled Drinkers</i> (2017). Courtesy of CG Boerner.

Kate McCrickard, Untitled Drinkers (2017). Courtesy of C.G. Boerner.

14. “The Hour of the Little Cocktail: Drink in Print, Now and Then” at C.G. Boerner
A printed history of imbibing through the decades.

526 West 26th Street;  through November 22; open 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Tom Hammick, <em>Wanderer</em> (2017). Courtesy of the artist.

Tom Hammick, Wanderer
(2017). Courtesy of the artist.

15. “Tom Hammick: Lunar Voyage” at Flowers Gallery
Tom Hammick depicts the moon, stars, and other sci fi-inspired scenes in otherworldly prints.

529 West 20th Street; through December 16; Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Emory Douglas, poster for the Black Panters (1969). Courtesy of the Schomburg Center.

Emory Douglas, poster for the Black Panters (1969). Courtesy of the Schomburg Center.9

16. “Power in Print” at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
The poster was a major part of the Black Power movement, and the 1960s and ’70s mark an important period in graphic design history. The Schomburg displays dozens of posters from its Art and Artifacts Division, with a special focus on artist, designer, and former Minister of Culture of the Black Panther Party, Emory Douglas.

515 Malcolm X Boulevard; through March 31, 2018; Monday, Thursday-Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.Tuesday and Wednesday, 10 a.m.–8 p.m.

Susan Sgorbati and Thorsten Dennerline, <i>Four Emergent Forms Volume 4, Dream</i> (2017). Courtesy of The Bird Press.

Susan Sgorbati and Thorsten Dennerline, Four Emergent Forms Volume 4, Dream (2017). Courtesy of The Bird Press.

17. Editions/Artists’ Books Fair 2017 at the Tunnel
Presented this year by the Lower East Side Printshop, the EAB Fair showcases contemporary prints, multiples, and artists’ books from publishers around the world.

269 11th Avenue; October 26−29; 11 a.m.– 7 p.m.

Emmy Lou Packard's <i>Front Street- 5 AM</i>. Courtesy of M. Lee Stone Fine Prints.

Emmy Lou Packard’s Front Street–5 AM. Courtesy of M. Lee Stone Fine Prints.

18. The New York Satellite Print Fair at Mercantile Annex 37
Just steps away from the Javits Center, the Annex brings together 15 dealers who will show prints, drawings, and other works on paper for Print Week.

517 West 37th Street; October 26−29; 10 a.m.–7 p.m.

Courtesy of International Print Center New York.

19. PrintFest by IPCNY at IPCNY

A three-day event that gives MFA and BFA students a forum to exhibit, sell, and trade their prints. The 2017 edition features 17 participating schools, and a range of programming, lectures, and workshops.

524 West 26th Street ground floor; October 26−28, 2017; Thursday 5 p.m.–9 p.m.; Saturday, Sunday 12 p.m.–7 p.m. 


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