Philadelphia Museum Gets Gifts of French Impressionism and Duchamp

8
View Slideshow
Berthe Morisot, Young Girl with Basket (1892). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
0/0
Marcel Duchamp, Portrait of Gustave Candel’s Mother (1911–12). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Marcel Duchamp, Portrait of Gustave Candel’s Mother (1911–12). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Berthe Morisot, Young Girl with Basket (1892). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Berthe Morisot, Young Girl with Basket (1892). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Édouard Manet, Basket of Fruit (1864). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Camille Pissarro, Railroad to Dieppe (1886). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Camille Pissarro, Railroad to Dieppe (1886). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Marcel Duchamp, Portrait of Gustave Candel’s Father (1911–12). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Marcel Duchamp, Portrait of Gustave Candel’s Father (1911–12). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Paul Cézanne, Mont Sainte-Victoire (1902–06). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Paul Cézanne, Mont Sainte-Victoire (1902–06). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Camille Pissarro, Avenue de l'Opéra: Morning Sunshine (1898). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Camille Pissarro, Avenue de l'Opéra: Morning Sunshine (1898). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Paul Cézanne, Mont Sainte-Victoire (1902–04). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
Paul Cézanne, Mont Sainte-Victoire (1902–04). Photo: courtesy the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is the recipient of two major painting gifts: a suite of five French Impressionist works by Paul Cézanne, Édouard Manet, Camille Pissarro, and Berthe Morisot, and a pair of early portraits by Marcel Duchamp.

Although all seven works are already on view in the museum’s galleries, the gifts still mark a substantial addition to the institution’s holdings, which already boast the world’s largest collection works by Duchamp with nearly 200 pieces, as well as a significant number of works by Cézanne.

The French paintings are a bequest from longtime supporter Helen Tyson Madeira, who died last year; she had served 20 years as an honorary museum trustee. The works are Cézanne’s Mont Sainte-Victoire (1902–06), Manet’s Basket of Fruit (1864), Pissarro’s Railroad to Dieppe (1886) and Avenue de l’Opéra: Morning Sunshine (1898), and Morisot’s Young Girl with Basket (1892). The Cézanne canvas, a major work from the artist’s later years, shows a mountain near his home Aix-en-Provence, and is displayed alongside another representation of the scene bearing a similar title, and The Large Bathers (1900–1906).

“The distinctive character of our collection is due largely to transformational gifts, almost all of which have come from Philadelphians who cared deeply about both this institution and their city,” Timothy Rub, the museum’s director and CEO, said in a statement. “The extraordinary paintings bequeathed to us by Helen Madeira had long been promised to the Museum and can now be seen in the context of the great collection that was a bequest from her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Carroll S. Tyson, Jr., more than five decades ago.”

Yolande Candel, whose father, Gustave Candel was a lifelong friend of Duchamp, donated two portraits of her grandparents dating to 1911–12, a pivotal period in the artist’s career. While Gustave’s father was portrayed realistically, his mother’s bust is unsettlingly mounted on a pole. “While growing up, I vividly recall Marcel expressing to my father his personal satisfaction with the fact that so much of his work remained together at the Philadelphia Museum of Art,” said Candel in a statement. “Furthermore, I think that both paintings would nicely complement the other early canvases by Marcel already in the museum’s collection.”


Follow Artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.

Share

Article topics
Subscribe or log in to read the rest of this content.

You are currently logged into this Artnet News Pro account on another device. Please log off from any other devices, and then reload this page continue. To find out if you are eligible for an Artnet News Pro group subscription, please contact [email protected]. Standard subscriptions can be purchased on the subscription page.

Log In