Suspected Planned Parenthood Shooter Was an Art Dealer

Robert Lewis Dear commissioned and sold fine art prints.

Marilyn Minter produced these buttons to support Planned Parenthood. Photo: courtesy Shoot the Lobster.
Marilyn Minter produced these buttons to support Planned Parenthood.
Photo: courtesy Shoot the Lobster.

The suspected perpetrator of Friday’s shooting at a Colorado Planned Parenthood clinic which left three people dead, was an art dealer, it has emerged.

According to the New York Times, Robert Lewis Dear (57) would buy the rights to paintings and drawings and commission prints in high editions of ca. 1,000 which he would market and sell for profit.

He primarily worked with artists who depicted his hometown of Charleston, SC, and southern themes including street scenes, drawings of Old South plantations, and magnolia flowers.

Attorney general Loretta E. Lynch called the shooting “not only a crime against the Colorado Springs community, but a crime against women receiving health care services at Planned Parenthood, law enforcement seeking to protect and serve, and other innocent people.” She added, “It was also an assault on the rule of law, and an attack on all Americans’ right to safety and security.”

Meanwhile, the BBC reported that Colorado state’s governor John Hickenlooper described the shooting as “a form of terrorism.”

Although the motive of the crime is not yet clear, the NYT cited a “senior law enforcement official,” who said the suspect had told authorities “no more baby parts,” in an interview, leading to speculation that the shooting was motivated by his opposition to abortion.

Colorado State Governor John Hickenlooper called the crime "a form of terrorism."

Colorado State Governor John Hickenlooper called the crime “a form of terrorism.”

Little is known of Dear’s political stance aside from one neighbor’s account of an anti-Obama leaflet the suspect had given him. However, the document reportedly did not contain any anti-abortion rhetoric or racist connotations.

According to records, Dear had numerous encounters with the law for minor offenses including a domestic dispute with his ex-wife in 1997, and a restraining order issued in 2002 after a neighbor had accused him of stalking her. In 2003 he was arrested on charges of animal cruelty, but was found not guilty.


Follow artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.

Share

Article topics