Get Your Selfie Sticks Out, a Selfie Museum Opens in the Philippines

2
View Slideshow
0/0
Photo: The Creators Project
Photo: The Creators Project

Recently crowned “the selfie capital of the world,” the Philippines has embraced digital self-portraiture like no other nation. It should come as no surprise that a museum dedicated to snapping #ArtSelfies has opened in the island nation’s capital, Manila, the Creators Project reports.

While the rest of the art world is cracking down on museum selfies (see Are Museum Selfies Endangered? Museums Ban Selfie Sticks), or is trying to curb visitors’ selfie-snapping habits with a dedicated day (see Did You Know It’s Museum Selfie Day?), the interactive Art In Island Museum has been specifically designed for taking selfies with art.

Visitors are not only encouraged to take pictures of themselves with the museum’s 3D replicas of famous artworks, but are also invited to interact, touch, play with, and climb on the paintings, sculptures, and installations.

According to When In Manila, the museum is split into 10 zones encompassing various topics such as fantasy, religion, the animal kingdom, and masterpieces. The newish Snap Remote device will surely come in handy for many a group selfie takers here (see Take Selfies Remotely With New Smartphone Remote).

Blyth Cambaya, the museum’s corporate secretary told Mashable, “Here, art paintings are not complete […] if you don’t take your pictures with them.”

John Elliel, an American tourist, enjoyed the museum’s unusual approach. “You have to be very serious in other museums. [In] this museum, you can really just let your goofy side out,” he said.

Despite being very lenient in terms of interaction with its exhibits, the only thing that’s prohibited at the Art In Island museum is shoes. Visitors are required to put on slippers to protect the 3D-paintings from footprints and heel marks.


Follow artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.

Share

Article topics