Spotlight: Eleven Artists Put Contemporary Twists on Ancient Myths in a New London Exhibition

“New Mythologies II” is currently on view at Huxley-Parlour.

Jeanine Brito, Something Borrowed (2022). Courtesy of the artist and Huxley-Parlour, London.

Every month, hundreds of galleries add newly available works by thousands of artists to the Artnet Gallery Network—and every week, we shine a spotlight on one artist or exhibition you should know. Check out what we have in store, and inquire for more with one simple click. 

What You Need to Know: How does myth exist in our world today? What stories do we tell ourselves to make sense of the world around us? In “New Mythologies II,” a group show of 11 artists at London’s Huxley-Parlour, responds to a society in which capital and technology are prized above human connection and spirituality, with paintings, drawing, and mixed-media works that present a counterpoint that ripples with symbolism, allegory, and dreams. The exhibition features the work of Jeanine Brito, Charlotte Edey, Molly Greene, Mary Herbert, Grace Lee, Natalia González Martín, Grace Mattingly, Tristan Pigott, Alicia Reyes McNamara, Jakob Rowlinson, and Salomé Wu. 

Why We Like It: This exhibition follows up on the gallery’s 2019 exhibition “New Mythologies,” which showcased the work of seven contemporary artists exploring the narrative potential of figurative work that incorporates elements of abstraction. The current exhibition embraces the magical, even talismanic qualities of art with more direct socio-political implications. British artist Jakob Rowlinson, for instance, juxtaposes medieval motifs, such as heraldry and coats of arms with BDSM aesthetics as explorations of gender, sexuality, and masculinity. Other artists tap into religious history and narratives. Tristan Pigott’s Margaret of Antioch (2019) portrays the tale of Saint Margaret of Antioch being eaten alive by the devil, disguised as a dragon, with an almost comic interpretation, while Natalia González Martín’s diptych Los enamorados, Resolución en dos partes (2022) draws from Jan van Eyck’s 15th-century Ghent Altarpiece, but the oversized legs of Adam and Eve are a lurid detail that hints at the profane. Biomorphism and plant life are explored by Molly Greene and Salomé Wu, tapping into questions of climate change, post-human existence, and biological transformation. 

According to the Gallery: “Melding archetype and allegory to reinterpret, and sometimes subvert, our shared mythologies, the dreamscapes in ‘New Mythologies II’ refute utopia in favor of their own, unique, internal logic. In places narrative, in others purely tableau, they incorporate timely, contemporary detail, while nodding to an old, enduring, dark fascination with fairy tale. ‘New Mythologies II’ is an inquiry into image making and meaning today.”

See images from “New Mythologies II” below.

Molly Greene, Dispersal (2022). Courtesy the artist and Huxley-Parlour.

Molly Greene, Dispersal (2022). Courtesy of the artist and Huxley-Parlour, London.

Installation view of "New Mythologies II" 2022. Courtesy of Huxley-Parlour.

Installation view of “New Mythologies II,” 2022. Courtesy of Huxley-Parlour, London.

Installation view of "New Mythologies II" 2022. Courtesy of Huxley-Parlour.

Installation view of “New Mythologies II,” 2022. Courtesy of Huxley-Parlour, London

Installation view of "New Mythologies II" 2022. Courtesy of Huxley-Parlour.

Installation view of “New Mythologies II,” 2022. Courtesy of Huxley-Parlour, London.

Installation view of "New Mythologies II" 2022. Courtesy of Huxley-Parlour.

Installation view of “New Mythologies II,” 2022. Courtesy of Huxley-Parlour, London.

Jakob Rowlinson, Kill all the Old Gods (2022). Courtesy the artist and Huxley-Parlour.

Jakob Rowlinson, Kill All the Old Gods (2022). Courtesy of the artist and Huxley-Parlour, London.

 

New Mythologies II” is on view at Huxley-Parlour, London, through September 17, 2022. 


Follow Artnet News on Facebook:


Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.

artnet and our partners use cookies to provide features on our sites and applications to improve your online experience, including for analysis of site usage, traffic measurement, and for advertising and content management. See our Privacy Policy for more information about cookies. By continuing to use our sites and applications, you agree to our use of cookies.

Subscribe or log in to read the rest of this content.

You are currently logged into this Artnet News Pro account on another device. Please log off from any other devices, and then reload this page continue. To find out if you are eligible for an Artnet News Pro group subscription, please contact [email protected]. Standard subscriptions can be purchased on the subscription page.

Log In