The Top 30 Most Exciting Street Artists Right Now: Part II

See who is changing the game.

James Goldcrown, Lovewall (2015). Courtesy of James Goldcrown.
James Goldcrown, Lovewall (2015). Courtesy of James Goldcrown.

In this three-part series, artnet News aims to find the best and brightest street artists working today, from known entities to emerging artists flying under the radar. See Part I here and Part III here.

11. James Goldcrown
In 2015, James Goldcrown became an Instagram sensation with his piece Lovewall, a spray-painted mural of dozens of bleeding hearts. Versions of the New York artwork have since popped up around the country.

Maya Hayuk, <em>Chem Trails NYC</em> (2013). Courtesy of Benjamin Sutton.

Maya Hayuk, Chem Trails NYC (2013). Courtesy of Benjamin Sutton.

12. Maya Hayuk
With her bold, graphic use of color, Maya Hayuk’s aesthetic is instantly recognizable—and occasionally copied.

Logan Hicks, <em>Story of My Life</em>. Courtesy of Logan Hicks.

Logan Hicks, Story of My Life. Courtesy of Logan Hicks.

13. Logan Hicks
The photo-realistic work of street artist Logan Hicks becomes all the more impressive when you realize he creates it using hand-cut paper stencils.

HoxxoH's mural project at the Miami Marine Stadium. Courtesy of HoxxohH.

HoxxoH’s mural project at the Miami Marine Stadium. Courtesy of HoxxohH.

14. HoxxohH
Beautifully symmetrical and incredibly detailed, Douglas “HoxxoH” Hoekzema’s designs are painted free hand, despite their astonishing precision.

Invader, Space2 on board the International Space Station. Photo: Invader.

Invader, Space2 on board the International Space Station. Photo: Invader.

15. Invader
The French street artist Invader has gotten remarkable mileage out of his pixelated-looking works, inspired by vintage computer graphics from Space Invaders—he’s even sent his work to the International Space Station.

JonOne, Pardon Me (2016). Courtesy of Galerie Bartoux.

JonOne, Pardon Me (2016). Courtesy of Galerie Bartoux.

16. JonOne
With his unique brand of Abstract Expressionist-tinged graffiti, influenced by the likes of Jackson Pollock, JonOne has been blurring the line between the street and the gallery for decades.

JR's latest street art installation. Photo: JR.

JR art installation in Tribeca. Courtesy of JR.

17. JR
The French street artist takes photography to the streets with large black-and-white images that, more often than not, are portraits from people around the world; they serve as a reminder of how much we have in common with each other.

Kashink, <em>ActUp</em>, Paris, France. Courtesy of Kashink.

Kashink, ActUp, Paris, France. Courtesy of Kashink.

18. Kashink
Defying gender roles both in her art and in life, Paris’s Kashink draws a mustache above her lip each day. Her rejection of traditional standards of beauty extends into her work, which features large, expressive, four-eyed faces in an array of colors and textures.

A mural by KAWS. Courtesy of KAWS.

A mural by KAWS. Courtesy of KAWS.

19. KAWS 
Another crossover success, KAWS parlayed his brightly-colored cartoon-like forms from the streets of New York to major museums, which now show his work in painting and sculpture, along with his street art.

Lady Pink, <em>Pink Ghetto</em>. Courtesy of Lady Pink.

Lady Pink, Pink Ghetto. Courtesy of Lady Pink.

20. Lady Pink
Street art pioneer Lady Pink led the way for female graffiti artists, getting her start on New York city subway cars way back in 1979, when she was just 15. Decades later, she is a major figure in a still-male-dominated field.


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