The Turner Prize 2017 Shortlist Is Here, and It’s More Diverse (and Older) Than Ever

Two of the nominees are over 50, a novelty for the prestigious prize.

Turner Prize 2017
From left to right, Hurvin Anderson, Andrea Büttner, Lubaina Himid, and Rosalind Nashashibi. Photos by Vanley Buke, Andrea Büttner, Edmund Blok, and GAJ, respectively.

This morning, Tate Britain revealed that the four nominated artists for the 2017 Turner Prize are Hurvin Anderson, Andrea Büttner, Lubaina Himid, and Rosalind Nashashibi.

The jury is formed by Dan Fox, co-editor of Frieze Magazine; the art critic Martin Herbert; LUX director Mason Leaver-Yap; and Emily Pethick, director of the Showroom, London.

Like in recent years, the resulting shortlist features three women and just one man. What’s remarkable this year is that all nominees are over 40—the organizers of the prize recently scrapped the under-50 age rule—and how racially diverse the list is in terms of the artists’ heritage.

Hurvin Anderson, Is it OK to be black? (2016). Courtesy the artist.

Hurvin Anderson, Is it OK to be black? (2016). Courtesy the artist.

Hurvin Anderson

Born in Birmingham in 1965 and based in London, Anderson has been nominated for his shows “Dub Versions” at New Art Exchange in Nottingham and “Backdrop” at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Canada.

Anderson’s work addresses urgent political questions to do with identity and belonging. Influenced by art history and his Caribbean heritage, the artist combines figuration and abstraction to craft eerie, dense paintings that span portraiture, landscape, and still-life.

Installation view of Andrea Büttner’s "Gesamtzusammenhang" exhibition at Kunsthalle Sankt Gallen. Photo Gunna Meier, courtesy Kunsthalle Sankt Gallen.

Installation view of Andrea Büttner’s “Gesamtzusammenhang” exhibition at Kunsthalle Sankt Gallen. Photo Gunna Meier, courtesy Kunsthalle Sankt Gallen.

Andrea Büttner

Born in 1972 in Stuttgart, Büttner has been nominated for her exhibitions “Gesamtzusammenhang” at Kunsthalle Sankt Gallen and her solo show at David Kordansky in Los Angeles.

Büttner’s work explores religion, morality and ethics through a variety of media, including woodcuts, reverse glass paintings, sculpture, video, and performance. The German artist, who is based in London and Frankfurt, is interested in the role of the amateur in the production of culture.

Lubaina Himid, Naming the Money (2004) at “Navigation Charts”, Spike Island. Photo Stuart Whipps, courtesy the artists, Hollybush Gardens, and National Museums, Liverpool.

Lubaina Himid, Naming the Money (2004) at “Navigation Charts”, Spike Island. Photo Stuart Whipps, courtesy the artists, Hollybush Gardens, and National Museums, Liverpool.

Lubaina Himid

Himid has been nominated for her widely-acclaimed trio of shows, the solo exhibitions “Invisible Strategies” at Modern Art Oxford and “Navigation Charts” at Spike Island in Bristol, and her participation in the group exhibition “The Place is Here” at Nottingham Contemporary.

Currently based in Preston, Himid was born in 1954 in Zanzibar, Tanzania, and was raised in the UK. She is a key figure of the Black Arts Movement and, throughout the last four decades, her work has teased out questions of personal and political identity through vivid installations, paintings, and prints.

Rosalind Nashashibi, film still from Vivian’s Garden (2017). Courtesy the artist.

Rosalind Nashashibi, film still from Vivian’s Garden (2017). Courtesy the artist.

Rosalind Nashashibi

Born in Croydon, London, in 1973, Nashashibi has been nominated for her solo exhibition “On This Island” at The University Art Galleries at UC Irvine’s Claire Trevor School of the Arts in California, and for her participation in Documenta 14.

The Palestinian-English artist, who is currently based in Liverpool, works mainly in the field of moving image. In her films, she explores sites of human occupation—be it a family home or the Gaza Strip—and the coded relationships that unfold within them, showing how intimate gestures take place in controlled environments.

This year, the exhibition of work by the four shortlisted artists will be staged at Ferens Art Gallery in Hull, as part of the UK City of Culture celebrations. It is slated to open on September 26.

The winner of the Turner Prize 2017 will be announced on December 5 at an award ceremony that will be broadcast on the BBC.


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