Editors’ Picks: 9 Art Events to See in New York This Week

Cool off with these shows.

Studio Museum in Harlem Artists in Residence EJ Hill, Jordan Casteel and Jibade-Khalil Huffman (2016). Photograph by King Texas. Courtesy of The Greene Space.

Monday, July 25

Danny Fields, The Ramones in the alley behind CBGB (1977). Courtesy of the Queens Museum of Art.

Danny Fields, The Ramones in the alley behind CBGB (1977). Courtesy of the Queens Museum of Art.

1. Rock ‘n’ Roll High School at Queens Comfort
This week is your last chance to see the Queens Museum’s “Hey! Ho! Let’s Go: Ramones and the Birth of Punk” exhibition, which closes July 31. Perfectly timed to the show’s swan song, Cinema Under the Influence is screening the punk rock classic Rock ‘n’ Roll High School twice in one night with all-you-can-eat hot dogs and unlimited beer at beloved Astoria-based eatery Queens Comfort.

Location: Queens Comfort, 4009 30th Avenue, Queens
Price: $25
Time: Screenings at 6:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Tuesday, July 26—Monday, October 31

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Sophia Al Maria. Black Friday (2016). Collection of the artist. Courtesy of The Whitney Museum.

2. “Sophia Al-Maria: Black Friday” at the Whitney Museum 
Sophia Al-Maria’s first solo exhibition in the United States features aspects of 21st century life in the Gulf Arab nations. By encompassing the term “Gulf Futurism” in art, writing, and filmmaking, Al-Maria reveals the sensational urban and economic development in the area over the last few decades, focusing on “environmental damages, religious conservatism, and historical amnesia.” This breathtaking exhibit is one to surely fawn over, as the historical context mixed with the artistic beauty makes it an incredible eye-opening experience.

Location: Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street
Price: $25 adults, $18 seniors and students
Time: Museum Hours

Daniela Rios

Tuesday, July 26

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Studio Museum in Harlem Artists in Residence EJ Hill, Jordan Casteel and Jibade-Khalil Huffman (2016). Photograph by King Texas. Courtesy of The Greene Space.

3. Studio Museum in Harlem Artists in Residence Conversation at WNYC’s Greene Space
The artists tapped for residencies at the Studio Museum in Harlem regularly go on to fame and glory, and this is your chance to see some up-and-comers so you can say you knew them when. The class of 2015–16—Jordan Casteel, EJ Hill, and Jibade-Khalil Huffman—will be in conversation with program alumni Kevin Beasley, Kerry James Marshall (subject of a retrospective at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago), and Dave McKenzie at this event. The evening will also see the debut of a series of videos from the artists’ studios. It’s organized along with New York’s public radio station, WNYC.

Location: 44 Charlton Street
Price: $10; RSVP here
Time: 7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Brian Boucher

July 26, 2016

Alicia Frankovich, World Is a Home Planet (2016). Courtesy of Luis Artemio De Los Santos.

Alicia Frankovich, World Is a Home Planet (2016). Courtesy of Luis Artemio De Los Santos.

4. Tehching Hsieh and Alicia Frankovich in Conversation at the International Studio & Curatorial Program
Tehching Hsieh is known for his durational, one-year performances, which include: “one year locked inside a cage, one year punching a time clock every hour, one year completely outdoors, one year tied to another person, and, lastly, one year without making, viewing, discussing, reading about, or in any other way participating in art,” according to MoMA. In the second of ISCP’s Brooklyn Commons talks, the performance art legend will be in conversation with Alicia Frankovich, who describes her boundary-breaking performances as “very sculptural.”

Location: 1040 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn
Price:
Free
Time: 6:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

Kathleen Massara

Tuesday, July 26—Friday, August 26

Brandi Twilley, Bed on Fire (2016). Courtesy of Sargent's Daughters.

Brandi Twilley, Bed on Fire (2016). Courtesy of Sargent’s Daughters.

5. “Brandi Twilley: The Living Room” at Sarent’s Daughters
For Brandi Twilley’s first solo show, the New York-based artist has drawn on memories, photographs, and Google searches to recreate her childhood home. When she was just 16, she lost it to a fire in 1999, and she brings it back in a series of paintings that show the building’s gradual decline and ultimate destruction.
Location: Sargent’s Daughters, 179 East Broadway
Price: Free
Time: Opening Tuesday, July 26, 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Wednesday, July 27—Sunday, July 31

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Jill Kroesen, The Original Lou and Walter Story, The Kitchen (1978). Photograph by Robert Alexander. Courtesy of the Whitney Museum.

6. “Jill Kroesen: Collecting Injustices, Unnecessary Suffering” at the Whitney Museum 
Artist, composer, and singer Jill Kroesen has been merging experimental music and performance art for decades. At the Whitney this week, Kroesen debuts a new “theatrical performance” for her fans, which will include “an elaborate sculptural set designed and constructed by Jared Bark and costumes by Mary Kay Stolz,” according to the press release.

Location: Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street
Price: $25 adults, $18 seniors and students
Time: Performance July 29–31, 8:00 p.m. On view July 27–28, 10:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m. and July 29–31, 10:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

—Daniela Rios

Wednesday, July 27

Andy Goldsworthy, Five Men, Seventeen Days, Fifteen Boulders, One Wall (2010), Storm King Art Center. Photo: Andy Goldsworth, courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York.

Andy Goldsworthy, Five Men, Seventeen Days, Fifteen Boulders, One Wall (2010), Storm King Art Center. Photo: Andy Goldsworth, courtesy Galerie Lelong, New York.

7. Rivers and Tides Screening at Socrates Sculpture Park
What better subject could there be for a summertime outdoor film screening shown at an urban sculpture park? 

This stunning art documentary captures the subtle beauty in British sculptor Andy Goldsworthy’s earthworks, which range from ephemeral creations made from fallen leaves to the stunning, winding stone walls at the Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, New York.

Location: Socrates Sculpture Park, 32-01 Vernon Blvd, Long Island City
Price: Free
Time: 7:00 p.m., with the film beginning at sundown

—Sarah Cascone

Thursday, July 28—Friday, September 2

Devin Troy Strother an abstraction for david hammons and matthew ritchie (2016). Courtesy of Hollis Taggart Galleries and Devin Troy Strother

Devin Troy Strother
an abstraction for david hammons and matthew ritchie
(2016). Courtesy of Hollis Taggart Galleries and Devin Troy Strother

8. “Highlight: Summer One” at Hollis Taggart Galleries 
Private dealer Paul Efstathiou—and friend of owner Hollis Taggart—makes his debut as a guest curator for the gallery with a group show of seven emerging contemporary artists based either in New York or Los Angeles.

“They draw inspiration from a variety of sources—from the streamlined minimalism of warehouse architecture to the haphazard freedom of childhood drawings, from occult rituals, to the new rituals of our digital age,” writes Eftathiou in the mini-catalogue accompanying the show. Artists on view include William Buchina; Elizabeth Cooper; Ted Gahl; John Knuth; Matt Mignanelli; Eric Shaw; and Devin Troy Strother.

Location: 521 West 26th Street
Price: RSVP at [email protected]
Time: 6:00–8:00 p.m.

Eileen Kinsella

Saturday, July 30

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Simone Leigh. Landscape, from the series Anatomy of Architecture (2016). Courtesy of the artist via New Museum.

9. “Simone Leigh: Guided Meditations for Black Lives Matter” at the New Museum 
From herbalist apothecaries to meditation rooms, American artist Simone Leigh surveys global practices in self-care among black women in her summer-long exhibition at the New Museum, titled the “Waiting Room.” To support the show, and to anchor her work in the Black Lives Matter movement, Leigh has enlisted the help of healer Mona Chopra to lead weekly guided meditations focused on “settling, soothing, and healing our stressed hearts, minds, and bodies,” as Chopra says.

Tea from the apothecary in Leigh’s exhibition will be spilled—and, of course, served—at each session.

Location: New Museum, 235 Broadway
Price: RSVP “Meditation” to [email protected]
Time: 10:00 a.m.

—Rain Embuscado


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