See Donald Judd’s Brilliant Prints in the Artist’s Soho Home

The famed minimalist was more than just a sculptor.

Donald Judd may be primarily known for his minimalist sculptures, but a new temporary exhibition at the artist’s former private residence in Soho, New York, will shine the spotlight on prints, an under-known facet of his work.

For four decades, Judd thoroughly explored the printmaking process, creating works using aquatint, etching, and screenprinting, with a special focus on woodcuts. The exhibition is curated by the artist’s son, Flavin, the co-president of the Judd Foundation.

Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.

Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990).
Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.

The Foundation opened Judd’s Soho home and studio to the public in June 2013 after a three-year, $23-million renovation. Visiting, however, required a pre-booked appointment and a $25 ticket.

That changed this summer, when the Foundation held its first temporary exhibition, free and open to the public on Fridays and Saturdays, featuring a pair of Dan Flavin’s fluorescent tube light works. (Upstairs, Judd’s bedroom is illuminated in stunning fashion by another of Flavin’s luminous sculptures.)

The print exhibition follows on the success of “Make art, not pipelines; Get in on the Ground Floor: Dan Flavin, 2 Works” which remained open late, until 9 pm, on its final weekend this month. In light of its predecessor’s popularity, the new exhibition will also be open on Thursdays.

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Donald Judd, Untitled, (1992–93). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
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Donald Judd, Untitled, (1992–93). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1992–93). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1988). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1988). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1992–93). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.
Donald Judd, Untitled, (1992–93). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.

Accompanied by a selection books from Judd’s personal library, the show will include three complete sets of woodcuts made between 1988–93, as well as metal furniture the artist designed in 1984.

“The furniture is furniture and is only art in that architecture, ceramics, textiles and many things are art,” wrote Judd in his 1993 essay “It’s Hard to Find a Good Lamp.”

“Donald Judd: Prints” will be on view at the Judd Foundation, 101 Spring Street, New York, Thursdays–Saturdays, 1 pm–5:30 pm, October 2–December 19, 2015.

Donald Judd, Untitled, (1988). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.

Donald Judd, Untitled, (1988).
Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.

Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.

Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990).
Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.

Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990). Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.

Donald Judd, Untitled, (1990).
Photo: © Judd Foundation, courtesy VAGA.

 


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