Editors’ Picks: 8 Things to See in New York This Week

Don't miss these New York events

Heather Hart, Oracle of Lacuna (2017). Courtesy of the artist © Heather Hart, photo by Jerry L. Thompson.
Heather Hart, Oracle of Lacuna (2017). Courtesy of the artist © Heather Hart, photo by Jerry L. Thompson.

Each week, we search New York City for the most exciting, and thought-provoking, shows, screenings, and events. See them below.

 

Thursday, May 25

Alice Walker. Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum/Scott Campbell.

Alice Walker. Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum/Scott Campbell.

1. An Evening with Alice Walker at the Brooklyn Museum
This intimate lecture from acclaimed author and activist Alice Walker, who won the Pulitzer Prize for The Color Purple in 1983, is part of the programming for the current exhibitionWe Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–85,” in the museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. The event is sold out, so keep an eye on Craigslist or watch on the Livestream.

Location: The Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn
Price: $10–35 (sold out)
Time: 7:30 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Betty Parsons, <em>African Dawn</em> (1972). Courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates.

Betty Parsons, African Dawn (1972). Courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates.

2. “Betty Parsons: Invisible Presence″ at Alexander Gray Associates
Seminal dealer Betty Parsons was also an accomplished artist in her own right. Her first show at Alexander Gray Associates, which recently began representing her estate, covers a wide timespan, from the 1920s through 1981, featuring painting and sculpture and showcasing her exploration of both abstraction and figuration.

Location: Alexander Gray Associates, 510 West 26 Street
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

 

Friday May 26

Villagers collecting scrap from a crashed spacecraft, Altai Territory, Russia, 2000 © Jonas Bendiksen / Magnum Photos

Villagers collecting scrap from a crashed spacecraft, Altai Territory, Russia, 2000
© Jonas Bendiksen / Magnum Photos

3. “Magnum Manifesto″ at the International Center of Photography (ICP)
This exhibition, which runs through September 3, marks the 70th anniversary of Magnum Photos, the agency created by Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, George Rodger, and Chim (David Seymour) in 1947. Curator Clément Chéroux, formerly photography curator at the Centre Pompidou, now senior curator of photography at SFMoMA, explores the history of the second half of the 20th century through the work of 75 masters.The show will feature both group and individual projects, and includes more than 200 prints, as well as books, magazines, videos, and rare archival documents.

Location: 250 Bowery, New York
Price: Adults $14; Seniors $12; Students $10; Children 14 and under, Free
Time: Tuesday–Sunday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Thursday 10 a.m.–8 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

Harrison Fisher <i>Red Cross Woman</i> (1917). <br>Courtesy New York Historical Society

Harrison Fisher Red Cross Woman (1917).
Courtesy New York Historical Society

4. “World War I Beyond the Trenches″ at the New York Historical Society

Just in time for Memorial Day and officially marking the centennial of America’s involvement in World War I, this exhibition (through September 3) looks at the war through the eyes of the numerous artists who documented and interpreted it. The show looks at artists across generations, aesthetic sensibilities, and the political spectrum, exploring how they used their work to depict, memorialize, promote, or oppose the conflict. The 55 works on view include pieces by John Singer Sargent, Childe Hassam,  George Bellows, Georgia O’Keeffe, Horace Pippin, and Claggett Wilson. 

Location: 170 Central Park West, New York
Price: Adults $20; Seniors/Educators/Active Military $15; Students $12; Kids under 13 $6; Kids under 4, Free (Pay what you wish Fridays 6 p.m.–8 p.m.)
Time: Tuesday–Thursday 10 a.m.–6 p.m; Friday 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella

Saturday, May 27

Jawn Billetes + Johnny Reis, VR work. Courtesy of Re: Art Show.

Jawn Billetes + Johnny Reis, VR work. Courtesy of Re: Art Show.

5. “Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:Re:″ at Re: Art Show
If you counted, you’ll see that that’s 11 “Re:s,” one for each of the group exhibitions hosted to date by Re: Art show curators Erin Davis and Max C. Lee. The duo have an arrangement with the owners of the former Pfizer Pharmaceuticals factory in Bed-Stuy, staging regular art shows rent free in spaces in the facilities that haven’t been leased out. This unconventional venue will host work from Elliot Doughtie, Jawn Billetes + Johnny Reis, Claire Christerson, Phaan Howng, Marvin Touré, and Jing Lin made in response to the remains of the old Pfizer pill production and staging rooms.

Location: Re: Art Show, 630 Flushing Avenue, Fifth Floor, Brooklyn
Price: Free
Time: Opening reception, 6 p.m.–10 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone

Through Saturday, June 24

"Luca Dellaverson: Mystic Stylez″ at Jack Tilton Gallery, installation view. Courtesy of Jack Tilton Gallery.

“Luca Dellaverson: Mystic Stylez″ at Jack Tilton Gallery, installation view. Courtesy of Jack Tilton Gallery.

6. “Luca Dellaverson: Mystic Stylez″ at Jack Tilton Gallery
This marks the artist’s third solo show at the gallery. In the latest body of work, Dellaverson continues with his unique blend of millennial pop cultural nostalgia mashed up with sly gestures toward art history and criticism. The exhibition takes the name of the first album by the hip-hop group Three 6 Mafia, “Mystic Stylez,” from 1995, presumably a formative pop cultural landmark for Dellaverson (born 1987). A series of works comprised of an LCD monitor, epoxy resin, and digital material make up a progression called Mystic Styles (The Drowning Dog). This work perfectly epitomizes the artist’s melange of abstruse, often unwieldy notions, with mass media; as the “Drowning Dog” is almost certainly a nod to Francisco Goya’s 19th century work, painted at a time of particular sadness and turmoil in the artist’s life. A continuation of Dellaverson’s most recent work includes paintings titled Break the Law and Encrypted Russian Emails, seemingly drawing parallels to the contemporary political climate with that of Goya’s civil war.

Location: Jack Tilton Gallery, 8 East 76th Street
Price: Free
Time: Tuesday–Saturday, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Eileen Kinsella 

Through Sunday, November 26

Heather Hart with her piece <i>Oracle of Lacuna</i> (2017). Courtesy of the artist © Heather Hart, photo by Jerry L. Thompson.

Heather Hart with her piece Oracle of Lacuna (2017). Courtesy of the artist © Heather Hart, photo by Jerry L. Thompson.

7. “Outlook: Heather Hart″ at Storm King Art Center
Brooklyn based artist Heather Hart brings an uncanny landscape to Storm King with The Oracle of Lacuna, as part of the sculpture park’s “Outlook” series; this is the first iteration of the site specific series that will incorporate public participation and programming. A red clapboard domestic roof seems to have fallen from the sky in The Oracle of Lacuna, and visitors are invited to walk around the visible protrusion, as well as an interior “sanctuary” below the surface. In keeping with Hart’s practice of mining the betwixt and between spaces that often go ignored—this work is a visual manifestation of the liminal. Parallels between notions of private and public spheres are linked to Storm King’s own history as a small enclave set apart from, and yet inextricably tied to the larger expanse of the Hudson Valley.

Location: 1 Museum Road, New Windsor NY
Price: General admission: $18
Time: Hours: Wednesday–Sunday 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

—Caroline Goldstein 

Through Thursday, November 30

Robert Indiana, <em>One Through Zero, </em>(1980–2003). Courtesy of the Glass House, © 2017 Morgan Art Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Edition 5/6. Photo by Tom Powel Imaging.

Robert Indiana, One Through Zero, (1980–2003). Courtesy of the Glass House, © 2017 Morgan Art Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Edition 5/6. Photo by Tom Powel Imaging.

8. “Robert Indiana: One Through Zero″ at the Glass House
If you’re looking for a Memorial Day week day trip, look no further than the Glass House in New Canaan, celebrating the 10th anniversary of its joining the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The latest addition to the bucolic grounds surrounding the Phillip Johnson-designed house is the first public installation of the complete set of Robert Indiana’s COR-TEN steel sculptures ONE through ZERO. The 10 digits, each six feet tall, were conceived in 1980 and produced in 2003. “The numbers had a kind of robustness and…crude vigor which I liked,” said Indiana in a statement.

Location: The Glass House, 199 Elm Street, New Canaan, Connecticut
Price: $50 weekdays, $60 weekends
Time: Requires advance tour appointment, Thursday–Monday, 9:30 a.m.–6 p.m.

—Sarah Cascone


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