Fall Art Preview: 30 of the Most Important Museum Exhibitions to See Around the Globe This Season

artnet News editors pick their favorite exhibitions taking place around the world this summer.

Rineke Dijkstra's Vondelpark (2005) will be in the artist's major survey at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art. Courtesy of Marian Goodman.
Rineke Dijkstra's Vondelpark (2005) will be in the artist's major survey at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art. Courtesy of Marian Goodman.

This summer of international art fairs and events is winding down, but the art world is ramping up for an impressive roster of museum shows to close out 2017. From the worldwide centennial celebration of Rodin, to a tribute to the lesser-known Latina artists of Los Angeles, here are 30 travel-worthy shows from around the world.

"Wifredo

1.”The Drawings of Wifredo Lam: 1940–1955” at the Lehigh University Art Galleries Teaching Museum, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, August 30–December 10, 2017

For the first time, Cuban collector Juan Castillo Vázquez, the grandnephew of Wifredo Lam, is lending a selection of Lam’s work to a US institution. Museum director and chief curator Ricardo Viera first visited Cuba back in 1997 to see Vázquez’s impressive holdings, meaning this exhibition of 21 works on paper has been 20 years in the making.

The Lehigh University Art Galleries Teaching Museum is located at 420 East Packer Avenue. Admission is free.

Auguste Rodin, <em>The Age of Bronze</em> (1875–76) and <em>The Thinker</em> (1880–81). Courtesy of the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Auguste Rodin, The Age of Bronze (1875–76) and The Thinker (1880–81). Courtesy of the Cleveland Museum of Art.

2. “Rodin: 100 Years” at the Cleveland Museum of Art, September 1, 2017–May 13, 2018

Worldwide commemoration of the centennial of Auguste Rodin’s death continues with the Cleveland Museum of Art showcasing its holdings of the great sculptor’s work. Some of the artworks included in the exhibition were acquired ahead of the museum’s opening in 1913, just five years before the passing of artist. Rodin cast a version of his piece Age of Bronze for the museum, which also owns a monumental version of The Thinker perched at the institution’s main entrance.

The Cleveland Museum of Art is located at 11150 East Boulevard, Cleveland. Admission is free.

Ilya and Emilia Kabakov

Ilya and Emilia Kabakov’s The Ship of Tolerance (2016). Photo: Luis Eduardo Martinez Fuentes. Courtesy of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

3. “Ilya and Emilia Kabakov: Utopian Projects” at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC, September 7, 2017–March 4, 2018 

The acclaimed Russian-born artists Ilya and Emilia Kabakov will be celebrated again in the exhibition “Utopian Projects” at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, DC. The couple’s work is based on the hardships of living in the Soviet Union, but are realized with unbridled creativity and imagination.

The Hirshhorn is located on the National Mall at the corner of 7th Street and Independence Avenue, Washington, DC. Admission is free. 

Michael Christopher Brown, <em>Helen and friends wait for their $1 cheese pizzas in Playa neighborhood, Havana</em> (2015), from the "Paradiso" series. Courtesy of the Annenberg Space for Photography.

Michael Christopher Brown, Helen and friends wait for their $1 cheese pizzas in Playa neighborhood, Havana (2015), from the “Paradiso” series. Courtesy of the Annenberg Space for Photography.

4. “Cuba Is” at the Annenberg Space for Photography, Los Angeles, September 9, 2017–March 4, 2018

Photographers Elliott Erwitt, Leysis Quesada, Raúl Cañibano, Tria Giovan, and Michael Dweck, have documented contemporary Cuban life in over 100 images that go well beyond the colorful architecture and classic cars so often captured in views of the island nation. Part of the Pacific Standard Time initiative, the exhibition reveals how real Cubans live their lives, from El Paquete, an illegal weekly selection of downloadable American media, to the Frikis, a community of young punk rockers who in the 1980s and ’90s deliberately infected themselves with AIDS in order to live in government-run sanatoriums.

The Annenberg Space for Photography is located at 2000 Avenue of Stars, Los Angeles. Admission is free.

Jean Fouquet, <em>Virgin and Child Surrounded by Angels</em>, the right panel of the Melun Diptych (circa 1455). © Antwerpen, Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten.

Jean Fouquet, Virgin and Child Surrounded by Angels, the right panel of the Melun Diptych (circa 1455). © Antwerpen, Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten.

5. “Jean Fouquet: The Melun Diptych at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, September 15, 2017–January 7, 2018

For the first time in 80 years, art lovers will be able to see both panels of the Melun Diptych, Jean Fouqet’s 15th-century French masterpiece, featuring the sexiest Madonna you’ve ever seen. There have been several failed attempts to reunite the two panels over recent decades, making the reunion here all the more significant.

The Staatliche Museen zu Berlin is located at Matthäikirchplatz, 10785 Berlin. General admission is €12 ($14)

Josely Carvalho’s Waiting (1982). Courtesy of Josely Carvalho. Artwork © the artist.

6. “Radical Women: Latin American Art 60-85” at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, September 15–December 31, 2017

For Pacific Standard Time, the Hammer Museum examines the contributions of Latin American women to the contemporary arts of the United States. More than 100 artists will be represented in this expansive exhibition. Well known international artists including Lygia Clark and Ana Mendieta will be joined by lesser-known names like Feliza Bursztyn, Zilia Sánchez, and Leticia Parente.

The Hammer is located at 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. Admission is free. 

Judy Chicago, <em>The Dinner Party</em>. Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

Judy Chicago, The Dinner Party (1974–1979). Courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

7. “Inside the Dinner Party Studio” at the National Museum of Women in the Arts Library, Washington, DC, September 17, 2017–January 5, 2018

It took Judy Chicago five years to create The Dinner Party, perhaps the most famous feminist piece in the history of art. That painstaking process is explored at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, showcasing the artist’s research in uncovering the stories of history’s forgotten women, as well as film documentation of the work of Chicago and her hundreds of volunteers. (At the Brooklyn Museum, where the piece is permanently on display, “Roots of The Dinner Party: History in the Making,” which also recounts the work’s genesis, is on view October 20, 2017–March 4, 2018.)

National Museum of Women in the Arts is located at 1250 New York Ave NW, Washington, DC. General admission is $10.

Edgar Degas, <em>The Red Ballet Skirts</em> (circa 1900). Courtesy of the Burrell Collection © CSG CIC Glasgow Museums Collection.

Edgar Degas, The Red Ballet Skirts (circa 1900).
Courtesy of the Burrell Collection © CSG CIC Glasgow Museums Collection.

8. “Drawn in Colour: Degas from the Burrell” at the National Gallery, London, September 20, 2017–May 7, 2018

Scotland’s rarely exhibited Burrell Collection, one of the world’s largest holdings of work by Edgar Degas, lends 20 pastels by the artist to London’s National Gallery. Shown alongside other Degas works from the museum collection, the exhibition showcases Degas’s unique take on contemporary Parisian life.

The National Gallery is located at Trafalgar Square, London. Admission is free. 

Rineke Dijkstra, <em>Almerisa, Asylum Seekers’ Center, Leiden, The Netherlands, March 14, 1994</em>, 1994/1999. Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery. © Rineke Dijkstra

Rineke Dijkstra, Almerisa, Asylum Seekers’ Center, Leiden, The Netherlands, March 14, 1994, 1994/1999. Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery. © Rineke Dijkstra

9. “Rineke Dijkstra: The One and the Many” at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humelbæk, Denmark, September 21–December 30, 2017

Dutch photographer and filmmaker Rineke Dijkstra has plumbed the depths of adolescence for years, capturing unexpected beauty in everyday moments. See her here in her Scandinavian debut in this extensive survey. (On November 9, the museum will also open “George Condo: The Way I Think,” that artist’s first show in Scandinavia.)

The Louisiana Museum is located at Gammel Strandvek 13, Humelbæk, Denmark. General admission is DKK 125 ($20).

Jasper Johns,<br /> <em>Painting with Two Balls</em> (1960). Courtesy of photographer Jamie Stukenberg © The Wildenstein Plattner Institute, 2017. © Jasper Johns/VAGA, New York/DACS, London 2017.

Jasper Johns, Painting with Two Balls (1960). Courtesy of photographer Jamie Stukenberg © The Wildenstein Plattner Institute, 2017. © Jasper Johns/VAGA, New York/DACS, London 2017.

10. “Jasper Johns: ‘Something Resembling Truth’” at the Royal Academy of Art, London, September 23–December 10, 2017

Legendary American artist and Royal Academy member Jasper Johns gets a massive UK retrospective—his first in the country in 40 years. The show will feature over 150 paintings, sculptures, prints, and drawings. The academy is promising a chance to see works that are rarely exhibited together in one place, with loans from private collections and museums from around the world. In 2018, the exhibition will travel to Los Angeles, opening at the Broad on February 10.

The Royal Academy of Art is located at Burlington House, Piccadilly in Mayfair. General admission is £19 ($24.36).

Mark Rothko’s Untitled (1955) © 1998 Kate Rothko Prizel & Christopher Rothko/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

11. “Mark Rothko: Reflection” at MFA Boston, September 24, 2017–September 3, 2018

An early Mark RothkoThru the Window (1938), makes its public US debut in “Mark Rothko: Reflection” at the Museum of Fine Art Boston. The show will feature 11 works by the artist, on loan from the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. From early Surrealist works to his iconic Color Field paintings, the exhibition spans the full range of Rothko’s career.

The Museum of Fine Art Boston is located at Avenue of the Arts, 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston. General admission is $25.

"Walker

12. “Walker Evans” at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, September 30, 2017–February 4, 2018

Billing itself as “unprecedented in scope and scale,” this Walker Evans retrospective is organized by SFMOMA with the Centre Pompidou, Paris, and features over 300 prints as well as close to 100 related documents and objects. The focus is on the great photographer’s interest in the American vernacular, which found beauty in everyday scenes across the US, even during the depths of the Great Depression.

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is located at 151 Third Street, San Francisco. General admission is $25. 

Ray and Charles Eames. Courtesy of the Vitra Design Museum.

13. “An Eames Celebration​” at the Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, Germany, September 30, 2017–February 25, 2018

In a museum-wide celebration of the pioneering design stars Charles and Ray Eames, four parallel exhibits will open this fall at the Vitra Design Museum. The four shows will touch on all aspects of the couple’s careers: Their toy collections, furniture experiments, and their cinematic oeuvre will all be available to see, just in time for the 110th birthday of Charles.

The Vitra Design Museum is located at Charles-Eames-Str. 2 D-79576 Weil am Rhein, Germany. General admission is €17 ($20).

"Clarence

14. “Clarence H. White and His World: The Art and Craft of Photography, 1895–1925” at the Princeton University Art Museum, New Jersey, October 7, 2017–January 7, 2018

Home to the Clarence H. White Archives, the Princeton University Art Museum showcases the work of the groundbreaking photographer, who helped the medium gain recognition as an art form. The traveling exhibition is the first retrospective dedicated to White’s career in over a generation, at once reestablishing his legacy and refocusing the story of early 20th-century American photography.

The Princeton University Art Museum is located at Elm Drive, Princeton, New Jersey. Admission is free. 

"Phil

14. “Phil Collins: My heart’s in my hand, and my hand is pierced, and my hand’s in the bag, and the bag is shut, and my heart is caught” at the Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland, October 7, 2017–January 28, 2018

My heart’s in my hand…, a collaboratively made sound work from British artist Phil Collins, gets its first US museum show. Collins tapped a homeless shelter in Cologne, Germany, to participate in the work’s creation, setting up a phone booth there with free local and international calling. The artist then enlisted musician friends to transform the anonymous conversations into musical compositions. Viewers can listen to the resulting recordings on vinyl in an installation of six listening booths at the museum.

The Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland is located at 11400 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland. General admission is $9.50. 

Tammam Azzam, rug design (detail). Courtesy of Fort Mason Art Center.

Tammam Azzam, rug design (detail). Courtesy of Fort Mason Art Center.

15. “Sanctuary” at the Fort Mason Center for Arts & Culture, October 7, 2017-March 11, 2018

Presented by the FOR-SITE Foundation, “Sanctuary” transforms a decommissioned military chapel with four-by-six woolen rugs in the style of traditional Muslim prayer rugs. Bearing designs by 36 artists from 22 countries and handwoven in Lahore, Pakistan, the rugs recall devotional objects, as well as the global trade in Middle Eastern carpets. Visitors will be encouraged to remove their shoes before entering the chapel, acknowledging the exhibition as a sacred space.

2 Marina Boulevard, Landmark Building C, Suite 260, San Francisco. Admission is free. 

Tom Sachs, <em>Astronaut Eannarino and the Handtool Palette Carrier (HTC)</em> from his "Space Program Mars" series. Courtesy of the artist.

Tom Sachs, Astronaut Eannarino and the Handtool Palette Carrier (HTC) from his “Space Program Mars” series. Courtesy of the artist.

16. “Future Shock” at SITE Santa Fe, October 7, 2017–May 20, 2018

Reopening after a massive expansion, SITE Santa Fe presents “Future Shock,” named after the 1970 book by Alvin Toffler, which attempted to explain society’s problems as a result of rapid technological and social change, coining the term “information overload.” Doug Aiken, Andreas Gursky, and Tom Sachs are among the artists featured in this group exhibition that attempts to illustrate the effects of the rapid and massive changes experienced by our contemporary world.

SITE is located at 1606 Paseo de Peralta in Santa Fe. General admission is $10.

Ugo Rondinone, It's late and the wind carries a faint sound as it moves through the trees. It could be anything. The jingling of little bells perhaps, or the tiny flickering out of tiny lives. I stroll down the sidewalk and close my eyes and open them and wait for my mind to go perfectly blank. Like a room no one has ever entered, a room without any doors or windows. A place where nothing happens. (1999 – 2000). Courtesy of the artist.

Ugo Rondinone, It’s late and the wind carries a faint sound as it moves through the trees. It could be anything. The jingling of little bells perhaps, or the tiny flickering out of tiny lives. I stroll down the sidewalk and close my eyes and open them and wait for my mind to go perfectly blank. Like a room no one has ever entered, a room without any doors or windows. A place where nothing happens. (1999– 2000). Courtesy of the artist.

17. “Ugo Rondinone: good evening beautiful blue” at the Bass Museum of Art, Miami, October 8, 2017–February 19, 2018

Among the inaugural offerings of the newly-reopened Bass Museum of Art, this Ugo Rondinone retrospective spans three decades worth of work, including the artist’s delightfully creepy vocabulary of solitude (2014), an army of 45 life-size clown sculptures cast from life and outfitted in sparkly rainbow attire. The show will end with the blue-tinged six-channel video installation It’s late It’s late and the wind carries a faint sound as it moves through the trees.… (1999–2000), not seen in the US in nearly 20 years.

The Bass Museum of Art is located at 2100 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. General admission is $10. 

Laure Prouvost, <em>After After</em> (2011) at the Biennale de Lyon, 2013. Courtesy the artist, carlier | gebauer, Natalie Obadia, and Biennale de Lyon/photographer Blaise Adilon.

Laure Prouvost, After After (2011) at the Biennale de Lyon, 2013. Courtesy the artist, carlier | gebauer, Natalie Obadia, and Biennale de Lyon/photographer Blaise Adilon.

18. “Laure Prouvost: They Are Waiting for You” at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, October 12, 2017–February 11, 2018

Laure Prouvost, the 2013 Turner Prize winner, creates image and sound installations that combine painting, sculpture, and found objects, accompanied by her own soothing narration. Her show at the Walker will also include a new theatrical performance piece, commissioned by the museum.

The Walker is located at 725 Vineland Place. General admission is $14.

Sheila Pepe, <em>Common Sense II</em> (2010), detail. Installation view, "Hand + Made: The Performative Impulse in Art & Craft," Contemporary Art Museum Houston, Texas.

Sheila Pepe, Common Sense II (2010), detail. Installation view, “Hand + Made: The Performative Impulse in Art & Craft,” Contemporary Art Museum Houston, Texas.

19. “Sheila Pepe: Hot Mess Formalism” at the Phoenix Art Museum, October 14–January 28, 2018

This traveling exhibition is the first mid-career survey for Sheila Pepe, a cross-disciplinary artist and prominent lesbian feminist who figured in the Lesbian Separatist movement of the 1980s, and has become known for her immersive crocheted structures. The show will feature some 70 works, including  a three-story, site-specific fabric installation specially commissioned by the Phoenix Art Museum.

The Phoenix Art Museum is located at 1625 N. Central Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona. General admission $18.

"Karim

Karim Ben Khelifa, The Enemy (2017). Courtesy the artist and MIT Arts.

20. “Karim Ben Khelifa: The Enemy” at the MIT Museum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, October 15–December 31, 2017

Photojournalist Karim Ben Khelifa has created an immersive VR experience that inserts viewers into the heart of military conflicts in the Congo, El Salvadore, and the Middle East between Israel and Palestine. By simulating interactions with combatants, the piece, here in its first North American outing, invites audiences to reconsider their attitudes towards violence and suffering. With this unique blend of science, journalism, art, and technology, Khelifa hopes to highlight the similarities between people, and how much these apparent enemies have in common with each other, and the viewer.

The MIT Museum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is located at 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Building N51, Cambridge, Massachusetts. General admission is $10. 

Camille Henrot, <em>A Long Face</em> (2016), detail. Courtesy of the artist, Fondazione Memmo (Rome) and kamel mennour (Paris/London); König Galerie (Berlin); Metro Pictures (New York)/photographer Daniele Molajoli. © ADAGP, Paris 2017.

Camille Henrot, A Long Face (2016), detail. Courtesy of the artist, Fondazione Memmo (Rome) and kamel mennour (Paris/London); König Galerie (Berlin); Metro Pictures (New York)/photographer Daniele Molajoli. © ADAGP, Paris 2017.

21. “Camille Henrot, Days are Dogs” at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris, October 18, 2017–January 7, 2018

As the third artist to participate in the Palais de Tokyo’s “carte blanche” series, Camille Henrot will take over the entire museum with a seven-part show dedicated to the days of the week. She’s enlisted a group of multidisciplinary artists including David Horvitz, Maria Loboda, Nancy Lupo, Samara Scott, and Avery Singer, as well as poet Jacob Bromberg, to bring her vision of the exhibition to life.

The Palais de Tokyo is located at 13, avenue du Président Wilson, 75 116 Paris. General admission is €12.50 ($14.70).

Charlotte Salomon, the young Charlotte waits for the angel of her mother in "Life? Or Theatre? A Musical Play" series. Courtesy the Jewish Historical Museum © Charlotte Salomon Foundation.

Charlotte Salomon, the young Charlotte waits for the angel of her mother in the “Life? Or Theatre? A Musical Play” series. Courtesy the Jewish Historical Museum © Charlotte Salomon Foundation.

22. “Charlotte Salomon” at the Jewish Historical Museum, Amsterdam, October 20, 2017–March 25, 2018

On the centenary of her birth, Charlotte Salomon, who died in Auschwitz in 1943, is having the first-ever showing of the entirety of her ambitious magnum opus: a set of over 800 gouache paintings accompanied by writings and musical cues. Creating the series “Life? Or Theatre? A Play With Music” was a way for the artist to cope with her family history of mental illness while living in hiding in France. The works are colored both by her tragic family history—her namesake aunt, mother, and grandmother all committed suicide—and the evils of the Nazi regime.

The Jewish Historical Museum (Joods Cultureel Kwartier) is located at Nieuwe Amstelstraat 1, 1011 PL Amsterdam. General admission is €15 ($17.60). 

Pablo Picasso, <em>Grande nature morte au guéridon</em> (1931). Courtesy of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Pablo Picasso, Grande nature morte au guéridon (1931). Courtesy of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

23. “Through the Eyes of Picasso” at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri, October 20, 2017–April 8, 2018

This traveling exhibition focusing on Pablo Picasso‘s deep-seated interest in African and Oceanic art makes its sole stop in the US, pairing the artist’s paintings and sculptures with a number of the non-Western works that served as his artistic inspiration.

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art is located at 4525 Oak Street, Kansas City, Missouri. Special exhibition ticket is $18. 

Alina Szapocznikow, <i>Autoportrait I</i> (1966).

Alina Szapocznikow, Autoportrait I (1966). © ADAGP, Paris 2017. Courtesy the estate of Alina Szapocznikow / Piotr Stanislawski / Galerie Loevenbruck, Paris. Photo: Fabrice Gousset.

24. “Alina Szapocznikow” at the Hepworth Wakefield, Yorkshire, October 20, 2017–February 4, 2018

Polish artist and Holocaust survivor Alina Szapocznikow (1926–1973) gets her first UK retrospective. She is best-known for her sculptures, which combine fragmented aspects of the human body with banal objects of utility, creating surreal sculptures that foreshadow the work of contemporary British artist Sarah Lucas. The exhibition’s over 100 works will also include drawing and photography created before the artist’s premature death at only 46.

The Hepworth Wakefield is located at Gallery Walk, Wakefield, WF1 5AW, Yorkshire, UK. Admission is free.

Claude Monet, <em>Gladioli</em>, now called <em>Rounded Flower Bed (Corbeille de fleurs)</em>, 1876. Courtesy of the Detroit Institute of Arts.

Claude Monet,  Rounded Flower Bed (Corbeille de fleurs) (1876). Courtesy of the Detroit Institute of Arts.

25. “Monet: Framing Life” at the Detroit Institute of Arts, October 22, 2017–March 4, 2018

One of the gems of the DIA collection, Claude Monet‘s Gladioli—recently rechristened Rounded Flower Bed (Corbeille de fleurs) following research by museum curator Jill Shaw—is being reunited with 10 other paintings by artist and fellow Impressionist Pierre-Auguste Renoir. All of the works were created in the Paris suburb of Argenteuil between late 1871 and early 1878, during the formative years of the Impressionist movement, and serve to tell the stories of Monet’s career and Impressionism in general.

The Detroit Institute of Arts is located at 5200 Woodward Avenue, Detroit. General admission is $14. 

William Kentridge, Model for the opera Wozzeck</em> (2016). Courtesy of the Museo Reina Sofia.

William Kentridge, Model for the opera Wozzeck (2016). Courtesy of the Museo Reina Sofia.

26. “William Kentridge: Enough and Too Much” at the Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid, November 1, 2017–March 19, 2018

William Kentridge‘s work in opera and theater, including such productions as 2010’s The Nose, make up this exhibition at Madrid’s Museo Reina Sofia. The artist’s set pieces, preparatory sketches, as well as films of the performances will be on view.

The Museo Reina Sofia is located at Calle Santa Isabel, 52 28012 Madrid. General admission is €8 ($9). 

Dara Friedman, <em>Mother Drum</em> (2016). Courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, New York ©Dara Friedman.

Dara Friedman, Mother Drum (2016). Courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, New York ©Dara Friedman.

27. “Dara Friedman: Perfect Stranger” at the Pérez Art Museum Miami, November 3, 2017–March 4, 2018

Miami-based artist Dara Friedman gets her first career survey, and largest museum show to date, featuring 17 major film and video works that blend emotional content with Structural Filmmaking techniques.

The Pérez Art Museum Miami is located at 1103 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami. General admission is $16. 

Frank Stella, <em>Paradoxe sur le comediene</em> (1974). Courtesy of the NSU Art Museum/photographer Jason Wyche, © 2017 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Frank Stella, Paradoxe sur le comediene (1974). Courtesy of the NSU Art Museum/photographer Jason Wyche, © 2017 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

28. “Frank Stella: Experiment and Change” at the NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale, November 12, 2017–July 8, 2018

This mammoth retrospective will feature 300 artworks, including paintings, relief sculptures, and drawings, created over Frank Stella‘s prolific six-decade career—exploring the many dimensions of his oeuvre, from the late 1950s to the present. In addition to some of Stella’s best-known works, museum director and chief curator Bonnie Clearwater has delved deep into the artist’s personal papers, showing sketches, maquettes, and other preparatory materials from his “Working Archive” for the first time.

The NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale is located at 1 E Las Olas Blvd, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.General admission is $12. 

Keith Haring at Cranbrook Art Museum (1987). Photograph by Tseng Kwong Chi, © Muna Tseng Dance Projects, New York. Artwork © Keith Haring Foundation, New York.

Keith Haring at Cranbrook Art Museum (1987). Photograph by Tseng Kwong Chi, © Muna Tseng Dance Projects, New York. Artwork © Keith Haring Foundation, New York.

29. “Keith Haring: the End of the Line” at the Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, November 17, 2017–March 11, 2018

In 1987, Keith Haring created a massive temporary mural at the Cranbrook. Thirty years later, the museum revisits that landmark work, presenting documentation of the project alongside work created following its completion, providing a compelling overview of the last few years of the legendary street artist’s career.

The Cranbrook Museum of Art is located at 39221 Woodward Avenue, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. General admission is $10. 

Amedeo Modigliani, <em>The Little Peasant</em> (c. 1918) . Courtesy of Tate Photo, © Tate.

Amedeo Modigliani, The Little Peasant (c. 1918) . Courtesy of Tate Photo, © Tate.

30. “Modigliani” at the Tate Modern, London, November 23, 2017–April 2, 2018

The Tate Modern has brought together the largest number of Amedeo Modigliani nudes ever shown in London for this expansive retrospective. Nearly 100 works track the artist’s evolution, exploring the influences of such artists as Paul Cézanne, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, and Pablo Picasso on Modigliani’s distinctive oeuvre.

Tate Modern is located at Bankside, London. Exhibition admission is £16.80 ($21.60). 


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