Here Are 18 Horizon-Expanding Museum Shows to See During Art Basel Miami Beach 2019

Here's the best art on view beyond the fairs.

Tseng Kwong Chi, Art After Midnight (New York), 1985. Photo courtesy of the Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU.
Tseng Kwong Chi, Art After Midnight (New York), 1985. Photo courtesy of the Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU.

Suffering from fair fatigue? Feeling like a lab rat as you wander through the maze-like labyrinth of gallery booths? We have the solution, with these private and public museum shows.

From the reopening at the newly dubbed Rubell Museum, to Jose Perez’s new art space, and a Kusama installation to boot.

 

From Day to Day” at the de la Cruz Collection
Ongoing through 2020

Installation view of "From Day to Day" at the de la Cruz Collection. Photo courtesy of the de la Cruz Collection.

Installation view of “From Day to Day” at the de la Cruz Collection. Photo courtesy of the de la Cruz Collection.

Rosa and Carlos de la Cruz’s latest exhibition of their wide-ranging collection features artists including Hernan Bas, Mark Bradford, Salvador Dalí, Isa Genzken, Ana Mendieta, Gabriel Orozco, Laura Owens, Sterling Ruby, and Christopher Wool.

23 NE 41st Street, Miami Design District. Admission is free. 2019–2020.

 

Can It Really Be 20 Years Already? Art in Our Times, Contemporary Masters, and Philanthropy” at the Margulies Warehouse
Through April 25, 2020

Anselm Kiefer, <em>Sprache der Vögel</em> (1989). Photo courtesy of the Margulies Warehouse.

Anselm Kiefer, Sprache der Vögel (1989). Photo courtesy of the Margulies Warehouse.

The Margulies Warehouse presents its 20th year anniversary exhibition with a survey that looks at the breadth of their collecting prowess, always with a focus on educating the public.

591 NW 27th Street. General admission is $10.

 

“Mira Lehr: A Walk in the Garden” at the Jewish Museum of Florida
Through February 3, 2020

Mira Lehr, <i>Resurrection I</i> (2017). Courtesy of the artist.

Mira Lehr, Resurrection I (2017). Courtesy of the artist.

Eco-feminist artist and Miami Beach local Mira Lehr is busier than ever at age 85, presenting an exhibition of ten monumental new paintings and 180 aerial sculptures hung from the ceiling of the Jewish Museum of Florida.

301 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach. General admission is $12. 

 

Teresita Fernández: Elemental” at the Pérez Art Museum Miami
Through February 9, 2020

TERESITA FERNÁNDEZ, Night Writing (Liang Shanbo and Zhu Yingtai), (2011). Courtesy of the Artist, Lehmann Maupin and STPI Singapore.

The PAMM sets the spotlight on Miami native Teresita Fernández with an exhibition of large-scale sculptures, installations, and mixed media works created from the mid-1990s to the present. Highlights include her mirrored floor sculpture Untitled (1997) and Fire (2005), a hanging installation of thousands of silk threads hand-dyed to depict flames.

1103 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami. General admission $16. 

 

The Extreme Present” Presented by Larry Gagosian and Jeffrey Deitch at the Moore Building

"Pop Minimalism Minimalist Pop" at the Moore Building (2018), installation view. Photo by Sarah Cascone.

“Pop Minimalism Minimalist Pop” at the Moore Building (2018), installation view. Photo by Sarah Cascone.

In the fifth iteration of Larry Gagosian and Jeffrey Deitch’s collaborative art exhibition, the focus is on “artists’ reactions to the conditions of our accelerating and increasingly complex world.” Despite the vague description, expect huge crowds coming for the big names propping up the program.

Moore Building, 191 NE 40th Street, Miami Design District. Admission is free.

 

Time for Change: Art and Social Unrest in the Jorge M. Peréz Collection” at El Espacio 23
Opens December 4, 2019

Doris Salcedo, Quebrantos(2019). Photo: Juan Fernando Castro.

Jose Perez’s new space in the Dominican neighborhood Allapattah (just a stone’s throw from the Rubell’s new digs) will debut during Miami Art Week, fulfilling what he called “an extension” of his work from the other major museum that already bears his name. The show is organized by Colombian curator Jose Roca, and will feature works by Doris Salcedo, Alfredo Jaar, and William Kentridge, among others.

El Espacio 23 – Jorge M. Pérez Collection, 2270 Northwest 23rd St, Allapattah. Admission is free. 

Wong Ping” at the ICA Miami
December 3, 2019–April 26, 2020.

Installation view of "Wong Ping: Golden Shower" at Kunsthalle Basel, 2019. Photo by Philipp Hänger courtesy of Kunsthalle Basel.

Installation view of “Wong Ping: Golden Shower” at Kunsthalle Basel, 2019. Photo by Philipp Hänger courtesy of Kunsthalle Basel.

One of the most memorable artists in the most recent New Museum Triennial in New York, Wong Ping makes absurdly humorous videos with simple, boldly colorful animations of anthropomorphic characters. He’s been commissioned to make a brand new video for the ICA. If previous work is a guide, expect overt sexuality and dark political overtones.

61 NE 41st Street, Miami Design District. Admission is free. 

 

Lara Favaretto: Blind Spot” at the Bass Museum of Art
December 1, 2019–April 19, 2020.

Lara Favaretto, <em>Momentary Monument – The Library</em> (2012–19). Photo courtesy of the Bass Museum.

Lara Favaretto, Momentary Monument – The Library (2012–19). Photo courtesy of the Bass Museum.

Lara Favaretto’s paintings, sculpture, and interactive installations often deal with themes of consumption and decay, and incorporate upcycled materials, like the 2,000 discarded books she gathered from across the city and has displayed on bookshelves for Momentary Monument – The Library (2012–19). She’s also created a new, site-specific permanent commission for the show. Titled Gummo VI (2019), the motorized piece features five large-scale brushes from an automated car wash.

2100 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. General admission is $10. 

 

Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen” at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), North Miami
Through March 29, 2020

Cecilia Vicuña, Burnt Quipu (2019). Installation view, Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle.
Photo by Mark Woods. Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul.

Chilean-born artist Cecilia Vicuña, who works at the intersection of conceptual art, feminist art, land art, and poetry, gets the first major US solo show of her 40-year career, organized by the Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans. Among the highlights are the small “precario sculptures” she’s been making from found objects since 1966, as well as her 2018 installation Burnt Quipu, which pays tribute to recent forest fires on the West Coast with floor-to-ceiling lengths of wool. The Miami edition of the show adds paintings, which Vicuña began making in the 1970s and has only recently revisited, sometimes recreating lost works from memory.

Joan Lehman Building, 770 NE 125th Street, North Miami. General admission is $10. 

 

Yayoi Kusama: All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins” at the Miami Design District
Through January 31, 2020

Yayoi Kusama, All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins (2016). Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York. © Yayoi Kusama. Photo by Cathy Carver.

Yayoi Kusama, All the Eternal Love I Have for the
Pumpkins
(2016). Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York. © Yayoi Kusama. Photo by Cathy Carver.

The ICA Miami is bringing Miami’s first-ever Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirror Room to the Miami Design District with an off-site exhibition. The Instagram-friendly artist built her first mirrored pumpkin room for the Venice Biennale in 1993, when she represented her native Japan. (If you want to brush up on Kusama kontent, there’s an episode of the Art Angle for that.)

112 NE 41st Street, Suite 106, Miami Design District. Admission is free on Thursdays, $15 timed tickets Friday–Sunday. 

 

Inaugural Installation at the Rubell Museum
Opens December 4, 2019

Richard Prince, New England Nurse (2002). Courtesy of the Rubell Museum. © Richard Prince

The Don and Mera Rubell are unveiling their grand new home, dubbed the “Rubell Museum,” just in time for art week, when they’ll have the most foot traffic guaranteed to inaugurate the space. The 100,000-square-foot space designed by Annabelle Selldorf will house both long-term installations and traveling exhibitions, with the kick-off tracing the arc of the couple’s collecting tendencies.

1100 NW 23th Street, Miami. Admission is free.

 

Trenton Doyle Hancock: I Made a Mound City in Miami Dade County” at Locust Projects
Through February 8, 2020

Installation view of "Trenton Doyle Hancock: I Made a Mound City in Miami Dade County" at Locust Projects. Photo courtesy of Locust Projects.

Installation view of “Trenton Doyle Hancock: I Made a Mound City in Miami Dade County” at Locust Projects. Photo courtesy of Locust Projects.

Beloved nonprofit alternative art space Locust Projects presents a new site-specific installation by Houston-based artist Trenton Doyle Hancock, continuing his exploration of the “Mounds” fantasy he created at the age of 10 years old. The show features hand-drawn pages from Hancock’s forthcoming graphic novel recounting the adventures of his hero Torpedo Boy as he defends the gentle, plantlike Mounds from the evil tofu-eating Vegan mutants, as well as a toy store display selling infant version dolls of the characters—visitors are encouraged to purchase one and to act out tales from the Moundverse at home.

3852 North Miami Avenue, Miami. Admission is free. 

 

Cuban Caricature and Culture: The Art of Massaguer” at the Wolfsonian FIU
Through March 1, 2020

One of Conrado Walter Massaguer's caricatures, courtesy of the Wolfsonian Florida International University.

One of Conrado Walter Massaguer’s caricatures, courtesy of the Wolfsonian Florida International University.

Conrado Walter Massaguer (1889-1965) was one of the most prolific and incisive artists working in Cuba, especially during the 1950s and ’60s. This installation focuses on the works recently gifted to the Wolfsonian, and explores the many themes that Massaguer’s work encapsulated, ranging from images of the iconic “flapper girl” to cartoons riffing on dignitaries and presidents who ruled the decades.

1001 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach. General admission is $12.

 

After Stonewall, 1969–1989” at the Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU
Through January 5, 2020

Laura Aguilar, Carla, From Latina Lesbians, 1989, Silver gelatin print, 14 x 11 inches, Courtesy of the Laura Aguilar Estate

Laura Aguilar, Carla, From “Latina Lesbians” (1989). Courtesy of the Laura Aguilar Estate

Honoring the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion in New York, this exhibition organized by the Columbus Museum of Art has amassed some 200 works of art and other objects showcasing the LGBTQ liberation movement’s impact on visual culture.

10975 SW 17th Street. Admission is free. 

 

I Paint My Reality: Surrealism in Latin America” at the NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale
Through June 30, 2020

Leonora Carrington, <i>Artes 110</i>, (c. 1942). Courtesy of NSU Art Museum, Fort Lauderdale.

Leonora Carrington, Artes 110, (c. 1942). Courtesy of NSU Art Museum, Fort Lauderdale.

Tracing Surrealism in Latin America from the 1930s to the present day, this exhibition drawn from the US Art Museum collection and promised gifts from the Stanley and Pearl Goodman collection features such major artists as Leonora Carrington, Frida Kahlo, Wifredo Lam, Roberto Matta, and Rufino Tamayo.

1 E Las Olas Boulevard Fort Lauderdale. General admission is $12.

 

WE BUY GOLD” at 48 East Flagler Street
December 5–January 7, 2020

Ivan Sikic, <em>LOOT</em>. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Ivan Sikic, LOOT. Photo courtesy of the artist.

For the third straight year, curatorial collective, GOOD TO KNOW is staging a Miami Art Week exhibition, taking over an 1980s-era mall in downtown Miami’s jewelry district for “WE BUY GOLD.” The group show is inspired by commercialism and mall culture, but also considers the title material from a variety of viewpoints—gold is a natural material that has become a luxury good and a trading commodity, but is also linked to exploitation. Featured artists include Kalup Linzy, Sara Mejia Kriendler, Matt McCormick, Ivan Sikic, Juni Figueroa, and Antonia Wright.

48 East Flagler Street, Miami. Admission is free. 

 

Hybridizations/Contemporary Strategies” at the Juan Carlos Maldonado Art Collection 
December 3–April 4, 2020

Imi Knoebel, <em>Untitled</em> (1983). Photo courtesy of the Juan Carlos Maldonado Art Collection. 

Imi Knoebel, Untitled (1983). Photo courtesy of the Juan Carlos Maldonado Art Collection.

Since opening its Miami Design District space four years ago, the Juan Carlos Maldonado Art Collection has dedicated itself to presenting exhibitions promoting contemporary Latin American artists. The latest offering featuring works by the likes of Vik Muniz and Imi Knoebel, considers how artists draw on existing visual languages to create new hybrid forms as a means of expressing the complexities of contemporary society.

Buick Building, 3841 NE 2nd Avenue, Suite 201, Miami Design District. Admission is free.

 

KidsBasel” at Wynwood Arts 29
December 3–7, 2019

A live painting by Elisabeth Anisimow. Photo courtesy of Elisabeth Anisimow.

A live painting by Elisabeth Anisimow. Photo courtesy of Elisabeth Anisimow.

The former Rubell Family Collection space, now home to Wynwood Art 29, is dedicating its Miami Art Week outing to a posse of tween art prodigies including Yung Lenox, discovered at age six and now 13; visual and performance artist Elisabeth Anisimow, also 13; 12-year-old Abstract Expressionist phenom Aelita Andre; and eight-year-old graffiti artist Rodrigo “Dyno” Barrera.

95 NW 29th Street, Miami. Admission is free. 


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