Your Definitive Guide to New York’s 2019 Armory Show and Its Many Satellite Fairs

There's a lot to see. Let us be your guide.

Armory Show 2017. Photo courtesy of Sean Zanni/PMC.
Armory Show 2017. Photo courtesy of Sean Zanni/PMC.

Get ready for a busy couple of weeks in New York.

Sure, there is a smaller pack of art fairs coming out of the gate this season than we’re used to. The team over at Collective Design decided to postpone what would have been the fair’s seventh edition after moving from Frieze Week to Armory Week last year. NADA, instead of staging a fair, is presenting a new initiative called the New York Gallery Open to lure visitors to spaces around the city. And VOLTA has been canceled to make room for Armory Show dealers who can no longer present at Pier 92.

But there’s still plenty to keep fairgoers busy. Here’s our guide on how to navigate it all.

ADAA the Art Show, February 28–March 3

The ADAA Art Show at the Park Avenue Armory. Photo Timothy Lee Photography.

The ADAA Art Show at the Park Avenue Armory. Photo Timothy Lee Photography.

The Art Dealers Association of America is gearing up for its annual Art Show, where select galleries from around the country will hock their greatest wares. This year, six galleries—P.P.O.W. and Anglim Gilbert Gallery; Salon 94 and Jessica Silverman Gallery; and Fraenkel Gallery and David Zwirner—have opted to join forces for dual presentations. Of the 72 exhibitors, there are a handful of first-timers (including Kayne Griffin Corcoran from Los Angeles) and one that’s returning to the fair for the first time in more than 20 years: the Castelli Gallery.

The Park Avenue Armory; $25

Gala preview Wednesday; Thursday–Friday: 12 p.m.–8 p.m.; Saturday, 12 p.m.–7 p.m.; Sunday, 12 p.m.–5 p.m.

Upper East Side Gallery Walk, March 2

As a special bonus, the ADAA is launching an inaugural Upper East Side Gallery Walk to take place in conjunction with the Art Show. Expect to see an uptick in foot traffic around the more than 25 member galleries lining the blocks between Fifth and Park Avenues. As added incentive, use the event hashtag for the chance to win a tote full of art books, and present your Gallery Walk map at East Pole and get a discount.

Between 5th Avenue and Park Avenue, locations vary see map for details. Saturday, 3 p.m.–5 p.m.

Salon Zürcher, March 4–10

Galerie Zurcher in the East Village.

Galerie Zurcher in the East Village.

This mini-fair is returning to its East Village outpost with its signature intimate presentation, which is a good antidote to the labyrinthine booths of the larger fairs. This year features a mix of solo artists bringing their own wares and a few international galleries showing off artists including Elise Siegel and Anne Russinof.

33 Bleecker Street; Free admission

Opening reception, Monday, 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; Tuesday–Saturday, 12 p.m.–8 p.m.; Sunday 12 p.m.–5 p.m., closing reception 5 p.m.–7 p.m.

 

NADA New York Gallery Open, March 4–10

Arcmanoro Niles, <i>How Much of My Mother Has My Mother Left in Me</i> (2018). Courtesy of the artist and Rachel Uffner Gallery.

Arcmanoro Niles, How Much of My Mother Has My Mother Left in Me (2018). Courtesy of the artist and Rachel Uffner Gallery.

In an effort to drum up local interest in NADA member galleries, the organization has pivoted its exhibition model, opting for a more collaborative approach. Instead of adding one more fair to the already overcrowded calendar, more than 50 participating galleries will operate a pseudo open-house, inviting visitors to engage with alternative spaces around the city.

Hours and locations vary, see map for participating galleries and information.

 

SPRING/BREAK, March 5–11

A work from Pajtim Osmanaj’s “Static Beauty” series. Courtesy of the artist.

All the cool kids flock to SPRING/BREAK for its curator-driven model, penchant for wild installations, and unconventional venues (this year’s fair is the former Finnish embassy at UN Plaza). Husband-and-wife founders and directors Andrew Gori and Ambre Kelly have selected 85 projects to represent the politically relevant theme of “Fact and Fiction.” An accompanying public art show will open in Times Square, with four sculptures on view through March 31 between West 42nd and 47th Streets as a part of the Times Square Immersive initiative.

866 UN Plaza, New York; $20

VIP preview, 11 a.m.–8 p.m.; Wednesday–Monday, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.

 

The Armory ShowMarch 6–10

The Armory Show in 2017. Photo courtesy of the Armory Show.

The Armory Show in 2017. Photo courtesy of the Armory Show.

The Armory Show had an unfortunate few days after it was forced to scramble up new plans upon learning that one of its piers was structurally unstable. But the fair is pressing on in its 25th anniversary year, which it plans to celebrate with extended programming. There will also be live talks, including one featuring our very own critic, Ben Davis.

Piers 92 & 90, New York, Pier 94, Pier 92, and Pier 90, 711 12th Avenue at West 55th Street and West 48th Street; $52

VIP preview Wednesday; Thursday and Friday, 12 p.m.–8 p.m.; Saturday, 12 p.m.–7 p.m.; Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

 

Independent New YorkMarch 7–10

Cary Leibowitz at Invisible-Exports at the Independent Art Fair 2018. Photo by Etienne Frossard, courtesy Independent Art Fair.

Cary Leibowitz at Invisible-Exports at the Independent Art Fair 2018. Photo by Etienne Frossard, courtesy Independent Art Fair.

The brainchild of Elizabeth Dee and Matthew Higgs, Independent is celebrating its tenth edition this year. The fair has spent the last decade working to upend the traditional fair model in spirit and in practice by doing things like eliminating aisles between booth presentations, changing 30 percent of the exhibitors each year, and developing curatorial projects with galleries instead of relying on tedious applications. This year, highlights include spotlights on many overlooked female artists from the past decades, including Gertrude Abercrombie at Karma and Renate Bertlemann at Richard Saltoun. Finally, Chicago’s Monique Meloche Gallery will present highlights of the gallery’s own history as it coincides with Thelma Golden’s “F” Series, aimed to promote the work of artists of African descent.

Spring Studios, 50 Varick Street; $29

VIP preview, Thursday; Friday and Saturday, 12 p.m.–7 p.m.; Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

 

Art on Paper, March 7–10

Courtesy of Art on Paper.

For anyone who appreciates a deckled edge, Art on Paper is returning with 85 galleries focused on presenting—you guessed it—art on paper. Expect the full range of printed matter.

Pier 36, 299 South Street, New York

Preview, Thursday, 6 p.m.–10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.–7 p.m.; Sunday, 12 p.m.–6 p.m.

 

SCOPE Art Fair, March 7–10

Judith Seligson, Signs of Struggle (2016). Courtesy of the artist and AH Contemporary.

The fair will stage its 19th edition in Chelsea’s Metropolitan Pavilion, with 60 exhibitors flocking to the city from around the world. The open-plan arrangement is perfect for browsing in an un-intimidating environment, where you can discover emerging artists and galleries. Look forward to the solo presentation of artist Judith Seligson presented by New York-based AH Contemporary: her abstract paintings recall the works of Frank Stella and Josef Albers.

Metropolitan Pavilion, New York

Platinum and VIP previews, Thursday, 3 p.m.–6 p.m. and 6 p.m.–9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.–8 p.m.; Sunday, 12 p.m.–7 p.m.

 

Clio Art Fair, March 7–10

Installation view of Clio Art Fair.

The fair takes its name from the Greek’s muse of history, and in a nod to the experience of working artists, helps those who do not already have New York gallery representation show their work in a professional way. This year’s special project is “I want to go Home,” which considers the refugees who live beside us, and those who are struggling to find a home around the world. Artists take the idea literally in some cases, with photographs of displaced peoples and imagery that alludes to the border crisis in the United States.

550 West 29th Street between 10th and 11th Avenues; $55 Thursday preview tickets, free Friday, $18 Saturday and Sunday with $35 networking brunch.

VIP preview, Thursday, 6 p.m.–9 p.m.; Friday, 12 p.m.–8 p.m.; Saturday, networking brunch 12 p.m.–2 p.m. and general hours 2 p.m.–8 p.m.; Sunday, networking brunch 12 p.m.–2 p.m. and general hours 2 p.m.–6 p.m.

 

New York International Antiquarian Book Fair, March 7–10

Photo courtesy of the New York International Antiquarian Book Fair.

Photo courtesy of the New York International Antiquarian Book Fair.

If you watched the Netflix series You and felt the urge to peruse rare old books, you’ll delight with the more than 200 exhibitors at the ABAA New York International Antiquarian Book Fair. Everything from maps to manuscripts, first editions and autographs are on display in this literary treasure trove.

Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Avenue; $25

Preview Thursday, 5 p.m.–9 p.m.; Friday, 12 p.m.–8 p.m.; Saturday, 12 p.m.–7 p.m.; Sunday, 12 p.m–5 p.m.


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