Don’t Miss the Top 10 Booths at Frieze Masters 2016

The main question on everyone's mind is: Will the fair be as successful this year?

Photograph by Mark Blower. Courtesy of Mark Blower/Frieze.

Leading up to Frieze this year there has been much concern about Brexit, and the shift in schedules. The main question on everyone’s mind is: Will the fair be as successful this year?

If preview day is anything to go by, the fair is more popular than ever, with people almost pouring in through the doors in sunny Regents Park. Here at Masters the galleries have brought a stunning array of works, and the collectors are definitely ready to buy.

For now, here is artnet News’ top 10 booths at Frieze Masters.

René Magritte, L’Empire des Lumières, 1949. At Dickinson.

René Magritte, L’Empire des Lumières (1949). Courtesy of Dickinson.

1. Dickinson
A major highlight of Masters this year is the René Magritte work L’Empire des Lumière (1949) on the Dickinson Gallery stand which is on sale for an undefined price of “above 20” million. Other works on view at Dickinson are a Salvador Dalí double bill, L’Oeil Flueri (1944), and the first artist’s proof of Mae West Lips Sofa (1936-74). It is positioned on the exterior of the booth, with full red lips and batting eyelids.

The theme of “Surrealist Revolution” references Breton’s 12 volume text, which is fully lived up to with works by not only Dalí and Magritte but also Man Ray.

Mnuchin Gallery at Frieze Masters. Photo artnet News

Mnuchin Gallery at Frieze Masters. Photo artnet News

2. Mnuchin Gallery
New York-based Mnuchin Gallery brought a range of modern works, including Willem De Kooning‘s Untitled XII (1986), a beautiful Giacometti drawing installed on the outside of the booth, a kinetic sculpture by Alexander Calder titled Red-Eyed Dragon (1950), plus a lovely, although tiny, untitled drawing by Agnes Martin done in 1961.

Paula Rego at Marlborough Fine Art. Photo artnet News

Paula Rego at Marlborough Fine Art. Photo artnet News

3. Marlborough Fine Art
There was much anticipation surrounding the Paula Rego works promised by Marlborough Fine Art ahead of the fair this year, which compliments their current show of her work on view in London.

During the pre-preview, the booth was packed with people looking at the work, which include a series of drawings and four large, bright oil paintings, including The Umbrella Pine (1985) and The Gluttony of Fish (1985). Simply seeing Rego’s work is a breath of fresh air, always.

At Timothy Taylor. Courtesy of artnet News.

At Timothy Taylor. Courtesy of artnet News.

4. Timothy Taylor
Timothy Taylor brought a more modern take to Frieze Masters than most of the other galleries present. Their booth was put together around the idea of how artists use technology, whether they admitted to it being a part of their process or not.

The main wall of the booth is dedicated to a 1973 Hans Hartung work, which shows the artist’s exploration of techniques, from acrylics to oil paint, and then to the spray paints he became known for later in his career. Also on view are a black and white work Endplate (1986) by Christopher Wool and Norman McLaren’s Synchronomy (1971), which he created using paint directly applied onto film.

Installation view of Frank Stella at Frieze Masters 2016. All images: Courtesy of the artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery, Dominique Lévy, and Sprüth Magers. © 2016 Frank Stella / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Dawn Blackman.

Installation view of Frank Stella at Frieze Masters 2016. All images: Courtesy of the artist, Marianne Boesky Gallery, Dominique Lévy, and Sprüth Magers. © 2016 Frank Stella / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Dawn Blackman.

5. Dominique Lévy/Sprüth Magers/Marianne Boesky
Dominique Lévy, Sprüth Magers, and Marianne Boesky have combined forces this year to present a stunning booth featuring the work of Frank Stella.

Not only was the area packed at the start of preview day, but people were audibly enthused about the quality of the works, which include looser, more abstract earlier works as well as instantly recognizable Stella paintings. The focus is very much on these earlier paintings, with only one sculpture on view.

Daniel Buren

Daniel Buren at Galleria Continua. Photo by artnet News.

6. Galleria Continua
Galleria Continua have brought a solo booth of works by Daniel Burden. By breaking down the space into sections, the gallery has created an intimate viewing environment and, cleverly, more wall space. There are works on canvas featuring his trademark stripes that are not to be missed.

There was a serious buzz about this booth with many deep discussions taking place, so we expect to hear about sales soon.

Mayor Gallery at Frieze Masters. Photo artnet News

Mayor Gallery at Frieze Masters. Photo artnet News

7. The Mayor Gallery
Mayor have are showing a solo booth of monochromatic reliefs by the acclaimed Dutch artist Ad Dekkers. The works on view are utterly plain, aside from the ridges and shapes on these large geometric canvases. The artist abandoned color in 1965, choosing to work only in white.

These unique forms look incredibly striking in a packed fair setting, and we also hear that they have been popular with collectors.

Acquavella at Frieze Masters. Photo artnet News

Acquavella at Frieze Masters. Photo artnet News

8. Acquavella
Acquavella is a quintessential Masters gallery and this year they did not disappoint. This year the New York gallery have brought works by Pierre Bonnard, Cy Twombly, a large Georg Baselitz Spekulatius (1965), and Lucien Freud in the shape of a small nude, and an early drawing Cacti and Stuffed Bird (1943).

This booth is a must see as a perfect example of the kind of range of post-war, modern, and post-impressionist works which makes Frieze Masters so special.

Philip Guston, Reverse (1965). © The Estate of Philip Guston. Courtesy The Estate of Philip Guston and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Genevieve Hanson.

Philip Guston, Reverse (1965). © The Estate of Philip Guston. Courtesy The Estate of Philip Guston and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Genevieve Hanson.

9. Hauser & Wirth / Moretti Fine Art
Why mess with a classic? In 2015, these giants teamed up to bring us a winning combination of post-war and Renaissance works, and they have brought a similar range to the fair this year.

Hauser & Wirth is contributing works by Phillip Guston, Marlene Dumas, Lee Lozano, Fabio Mauri, and David Smith; Moretti has work by Michele di Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio, and Ventura di Moro. This stand is a must-see.

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Helly Nahmad at Frieze Masters. Photo artnet News

10. Helly Nahmad
It wouldn’t be Frieze Masters without a Helly Nahmad booth, would it? Brace yourselves, as this year it’s all change chez Nahmad. Although the site is enormous, it contains three oil works by Pablo Picasso and nothing else—not even a table. The works are on offer for a cool £20 million.


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