Eleven Rivington Gallery Expands and Gets a New Name

Eleven Rivington's Chrystie Street gallery, with works by Michael DeLucia. Photo courtesy Eleven Rivington.
Eleven Rivington's Chrystie Street gallery, with works by Michael DeLucia.
Photo courtesy Eleven Rivington.

New York’s Eleven Rivington gallery continues to grow, and will change its name to 11R this fall.

Now spread between Rivington and Chrystie Streets on the Lower East Side, the gallery will consolidate at its Chrystie Street location, which will more than double in size by the end of this year.

The gallery opened in 2007 at 11 Rivington Street, where it measured only 650 square feet. Under the directorship of Augusto Arbizo, in 2012, the business expanded to a 1,200-square-foot storefront space at 195 Chrystie Street. This fall, 11R’s 3,200-square-foot footprint will represent a nearly fivefold expansion over the gallery’s original size.

Giving up the Rivington Street venue inspired the name change to 11R, even though it’s a tradition for some galleries with address-based names to stick with the same appellation through moves (New York’s 47 Canal, for example, has relocated twice in recent years).

The final show on Rivington, featuring Assume Vivid Astro Focus, Denise Kupferschmidt, and Shirley Jaffe, will be on view September 9–October 9. On view through July 3 at both locations is “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men,” by Vienna-based American painter Lisa Ruyter (see Lisa Ruyter Mines Classic Americana Photos).

The gallery’s roster focuses on young New York-based American artists such as Chris Caccamise, Jackie Saccoccio, Adam Shechter, and Mika Tajima, but also includes Berliner Volker Hüller and Brazilian artist Caetano de Almeida. The program for fall 2015-spring 2016 includes solo shows by Hüller, Saccoccio, and Tajima, along with Jeronimo Elespe.

11R counts itself among a growing list of galleries on the block. CRG Gallery will open at 195 Chrystie in September; Lehman Maupin Gallery is located at 201 Chrystie. Upstairs from 11R are Monitor and Kristen Lorello. All are just steps from the New Museum, on the Bowery.


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