News to Know: Must-Read Art World Headlines from March 24-28

From Amazon Art to collector trends, the week's top stories and news.

public-art-althamer-socrates
Paweł Althamer, Queen Mother of Reality (2013). Photo: Tom Powel, New York. Courtesy of the artist, Foksal Gallery Foundation, Warsaw, neugerreimschneider, Berlin, and Performa 13, New York.

VIEWERS’ CHOICE
New York might be trying its darndest to hold on to winter’s chill, but with warmer days ahead, public art is coming out in full force. Benjamin Sutton picked out the city’s 11 best outdoor exhibitions for the warm months ahead, from Alice Aycock‘s Park Avenue sculptures to Katharina Grosse‘s installation at the MetroTech Commons, for this week’s most popular post.

MARKETABLE
Need help getting into collectors’ heads? AXA Art surveyed 1,000 of the worlds best to see what’s driving art purchases this year. Lest you have to slog through the whole report on your own, we plucked the 10 must-know facts about who’s buying what.

CRITICAL
This week artnet News staff roamed Chelsea  for our weekly series of reviews. Five made the cut: Lauren Silva, Richard Kalina, Jorge Pardo, an exhibition drawn from the Onnasch Collection, and Friedrich Kunath. Hurry, most close within a week!

OPINIONATED
Paddy Johnson questioned the absence of Internet art from the Whitney Biennial (and every Biennial since 2002). In a call for more representation and celebration of digital art, Johnson argued that what’s happening online is the closest thing we have to a major art movement today.

PHOTO FOCUS
France displayed a growing reverence for Robert Mapplethorpe with two major museum exhibitions afoot in Paris. Coline Milliard outlined what can be expected at his first retrospective in the country at Le Grand Palais and a more intimate presentation of Mapplethorpe’s work at Musee Rodin.

LONG LOOK
The Internet was evidently on our minds this week: Sarah Cascone looked at Amazon Art’s success, or lack thereof. Without experts to help you wade through thousands of listings, Amazon Art is having difficulties finding buyers for high-ticket items, while fighting the reputation of offering decorative works rather than investments. But with growing acceptance of online art buying, there is the possibility of future success.

NEWS TO KNOW
Four Museums in Crimea Fear Losing Hundreds of Precious Artifacts

Amy Cappellazzo and Allan Schwartzman to Team Up on New Venture

A Portion of Cornelius Gurlitt’s Collection Will Be Returned

Daniel Loeb Sues Sotheby’s Over Poison Pill Provision

Shigeru Ban Wins Pritzker Prize for Architecture


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