Sotheby’s Unveils Blockbuster Monet Consignments That Could Fetch $78 Million

Is Impressionism back in fashion?

Claude Monet, Le Palais Ducal (1908). .
Photo: Courtesy Sotheby's.
Claude Monet, Nymphéas (1905) (estimate: $30 million–45 million). Photo: Courtesy Sotheby's.

Claude Monet, Nymphéas (1905)
(estimate: $30 million–45 million). Photo: Courtesy Sotheby’s.

Claude Monet is clearly having an art market moment.

Sotheby’s will offer no fewer than six of the master’s iconic works at its upcoming Spring evening sales in New York. In total, they are expected to realize more than$78 million. (See: Guarantees Spur Sotheby’s Impressionist and Modern Sale to Record £186.4 Million and Trio of Monets Could Break $60 Million At Sotheby’s).

Sotheby’s May 5 Impressionist and modern art evening sale will include works from the 1870s up until the 1910s with famous subjects such as Monet’s water lilies, and views of Venice, the Seine, and the coast of Normandy. Sotheby’s said in a release that the works are fresh to the market, having emerged “after significant time spent in their respective private collections.”

Claude Monet, Le Palais Ducal (1908). (estimate: $15 million–20 million). Photo: Courtesy Sotheby's.

Claude Monet, Le Palais Ducal (1908).
(estimate: $15 million–20 million). Photo: Courtesy Sotheby’s.

Among the expected highlights is Nymphéas (1905), a work from Monet’s beloved water lilies series that was acquired by the unidentified present owner and consignor in 1950. It is estimated at $30–45 million.

Another Monet, a Venice scene that was returned to the son of collector Jakob Goldschmidt in 1960, will be offered from the collection of his grandson, the late Anthony Goldschmidt, for $15–20 million.

Claude Monet, Au Val Saint-Nicolas Près Dieppe, Matin (1897). (estimate: $3 million–4 million). Photo: Courtesy Sotheby's.

Claude Monet, Au Val Saint-Nicolas Près Dieppe, Matin (1897).
(estimate: $3 million–4 million). Photo: Courtesy Sotheby’s.

The Monets are “exactly what buyers are seeking at this moment,” said Simon Shaw, Sotheby’s co-head worldwide of the Impressionist and modern art department in a statement. They are “famous scenes, emerging from prestigious private collections and completely fresh to the market,” said Shaw, adding that “new generations and new markets” are rediscovering Monet. The supply of great examples in private hands is dwindling, he noted.

Claude Monet, Le Chemin d'Epinay, effet de neige (n.d.). (estimate: $6 million–8 million).

Claude Monet, Le Chemin d’Epinay, effet de neige (n.d.).
(estimate: $6 million–8 million). Photo: Courtesy Sotheby’s.

In addition to Nymphéas and the Venice view, Sotheby’s is offering Bassin au nymphéas, les rosiers (1913), acquired by the current owner in 1991 (estimate: $18–25 million); Le Chemin d’Epinay, effet de neige (1875), bought by the current owner at a Sotheby’s auction in 1984 (estimate: $6–8 million); La Seine à Vétheuil (1901), which has been in the same collection since 1955 (estimate: $6–8 million); and Au Val Saint-Nicolas près Dieppe, matin (1897), which is estimated at $3–4 million.

Claude Monet, Bassin aux nymphéas, les rosiers (n.d.). (estimate: $18 million–25 million). Photo: Courtesy Sotheby's.

Claude Monet, Bassin aux nymphéas, les rosiers (n.d.).
(estimate: $18 million–25 million). Photo: Courtesy Sotheby’s.

The works will be on view in London from April 10–14 before returning to New York for exhibition on May 1 ahead of the New York sale.

Claude Monet, La Seine à Vétheuil (n.d.). (estimate: $6 million–8 million). Photo: Courtesy Sotheby's.

Claude Monet, La Seine à Vétheuil (n.d.).
(estimate: $6 million–8 million). Photo: Courtesy Sotheby’s.

 

 


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