9 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Louisa Chase, Red Sea (1983). Courtesy of Hirschl & Adler Galleries.
Louisa Chase, Red Sea (1983). Courtesy of Hirschl & Adler Galleries.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

William Kentridge
Universal Archive (Ref. 01)
David Krut Fine Art
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William Kentridge, Universal Archive (Ref. 01) (2012). Courtesy of David Krut Fine Art.

William Kentridge, Universal Archive (Ref. 01) (2012). Courtesy of David Krut Fine Art.

The cafeteria is a recurring motif in South African artist William Kentridge’s oeuvre. Most notably known for his drawings and animated films, Kentridge is also an acclaimed protagonist in the international theatre and opera scene. Over the years of his artistic practice, Kentridge developed an iconography that is charged with subtle allusions to racism and social injustice associated with the South African system of Apartheid.

Kentridge’s interest lies in the image of the coffee pot stems from the industrial design’s resemblance to the silhouette of a woman’s body, along with the stimulating effects and the creative power of coffee itself. Surely also, however, Kentridge is also interested in the political implications of labor exploitation that come along with the global trading of coffee beans.

—Elmas Senol

Joseph Arthur
To Celebrate Madness
Michele Mack Gallery
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Joseph Arthur, To Celebrate Madness (2020). Courtesy of Michele Mack Gallery.

Joseph Arthur, To Celebrate Madness (2020). Courtesy of Michele Mack Gallery.

A skull-like head rendered in rapid, energetic strokes appears against a background divided in fields of teal blue and pink. The color division could make one think of the left-right brain divide, one side more creative, the other more methodical. Other energetic dashes of color halo the head like static electricity as if visualization of the figures racing thoughts.

—Karin Petit

Ross Bleckner
Untitled (Yellow/Green)
Crane Kalman
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Ross Bleckner, Untitled (Yellow/Green) (2013). Courtesy of Crane Kalman.

Ross Bleckner, Untitled (Yellow/Green) (2013). Courtesy of Crane Kalman.

Whether you think they resemble fireworks, blossoms, or reflections in dark water, the gently blurred outlines of these abstract shapes are a classic example of New York painter Ross Bleckner’s work. 

—Sara Carson

Louisa Chase
Sunset Grip
Hirschl & Adler Galleries
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Louisa Chase, Sunset Grip (1983). Courtesy of Hirschl & Adler Galleries.

Louisa Chase, Sunset Grip (1983). Courtesy of Hirschl & Adler Galleries.

I am fascinated by artwork that manages to achieve a sense of timelessness. Sunset Grip, although nearing 40 years since its execution, feels contemporary through its use of color, particularly the fashionable pastel pink, coupled with the hint of figuration, and line work of cartoon illustration that young artists continue to popularize today. Chase was educated as a Yale MFA graduate and her work is included in numerous public collections. Many of her works have this sense of newness while remaining grounded in her adaptation of abstract expressionism and femininity.

—Santiago Garcia Cano

Aldo Luongo
Peering at the Balcony
Chloe Gallery
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Aldo Luongo, Peering at the Balcony (2018). Courtesy of Chloe Gallery.

Aldo Luongo, Peering at the Balcony (2018). Courtesy of Chloe Gallery.

Though Aldo Luongo made this portrait in 2018, it seemed to foreshadow our current “new normal” of social isolation even when it comes to relaxation. This depiction of a woman enjoying a glass of wine while looking out on her balcony feels like a snapshot of life in the city this year. 

—Qadira Farrington

Anca Stefanescu
Guardians
Eclectic Gallery
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Anca Stefanescu, Guardians (2018). Courtesy of Eclectic Gallery.

Anca Stefanescu, Guardians (2018). Courtesy of Eclectic Gallery.

I find this nude by Romanian artist Anca Stefanescu incredibly hypnotizing. Everything from the “heat-map” like quality of the skin to the DMT explosion of a background creates a powerful, eye-popping image that it’s hard to look away from. 

—Cristina Cruz

Brent R. Laycock
Creekside Guardian
Wallace Galleries Ltd.
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Brent R. Laycock, Creekside Guardian (2015). Courtesy of Wallace Galleries Ltd.

Brent R. Laycock, Creekside Guardian (2015). Courtesy of Wallace Galleries Ltd.

Brent R. Laycock is a Canadian artist who focuses on landscapes in watercolor and acrylic. The wild branches in Creekside Guardian give this peaceful scene a dynamic quality. I want to visit this place and spend a whole day playing in the water and laying in the grass.

—Neha Jambhekar

Christin Lutze
Green Arcadia
AppleX Art
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Christin Lutze, Green Arcadia (2020). Courtesy of AppleX Art.

Christin Lutze, Green Arcadia (2020). Courtesy of AppleX Art.

The artist Christin Lutze has said of her practice: “I create imaginary spaces in which neither perspective nor architectural constructs could exist in this way. I shift viewpoints, distort planes, deform bars or reduce distances. Nevertheless, my paintings are real, the spaces are theoretically accessible.” In this painting, we see a fractured, fun-house-like space that the eye can’t help but explore again and again.  

—Yi Zhang

Kelly Grace
Gibraltar Beach
Galerie Robertson Arès
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Kelly Grace, Gibraltar Beach. Courtesy of Galerie Robertson Arès.

Kelly Grace, Gibraltar Beach (2020). Courtesy of Galerie Robertson Arès.

The glamor of a by-gone era permeates this painting by Canadian artist Kelly Grace. With summer drawing to a close, this work seems to carry the perfect tone of reflection and sentimentality that comes with the end of the season. 

—Carson Wos


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