In Its 40th Anniversary Year, AIPAD Is Putting on a Photography Fair to Remember

There's a lot to celebrate, and the show will be the perfect place to do it.

Mickalene Thomas, Les Trois Femmes Deux (2018). Courtesy Yancey Richardson Gallery.
Mickalene Thomas, Les Trois Femmes Deux (2018). Courtesy Yancey Richardson Gallery.

It’s a milestone birthday for AIPAD, as the association marks its 40th anniversary this year. And there is reason to celebrate: The Photography Show, the association’s annual fair, is still the can’t-miss event for New York photography dealers, collectors, and enthusiasts. But far from resting on his laurels, AIPAD’s President Richard Moore tells artnet that fair-goers can expect a host of changes including a new layout and specially curated projects—but with all “the same devotion to photography itself, with all its delights and intellectual pleasures.” 

We spoke with Moore about what to look out for as the fair gets ready for its big open.

Laura Letinsky, Untitled #38 from the series Hardly More Than Ever (2001). Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery.

Laura Letinsky, Untitled #38 from the series Hardly More Than Ever (2001) which will be included in A Room for Solace, an exhibition curated by Alec Soth. Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery.

It’s AIPAD’s 40th anniversary and the 39th edition of the Photography Show. Can we expect any changes to the format of the fair in layout or programming?

Yes, we’re introducing a new section of Project Spaces, which will feature either solo artist or thematic curations. These spaces will allow galleries that are also exhibiting in the main section to devote attention to a special, more focused idea. The Project Spaces will also provide a more affordable option for galleries not exhibiting in the main section to participate with one of their artists. That will create an important new layer to the show experience. 

This year, we’ve also redesigned the layout, concentrating the main galleries near the center of the show, for a more welcoming experience. This is only our third fair at Pier 94, and we’re still learning the space. 

What should fair-goers definitely not miss? 

Award-winning photographer Alec Soth has curated a special exhibition entitled A Room for Solace: An Exhibition of Domestic Interiors. We started featuring these specially curated exhibitions in 2017. This will be the third exhibition. It will include more than 40 images chosen by Alec that in someway speak to the possibility of finding refuge during turbulent times. Comprising portraiture, still life, and reportage, these pictures are connected by a quality of intimacy. The photographers featured include Diane Arbus, Harry Callahan, Bruce Davidson, Elliott Erwitt, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Danny Lyon, René Magritte, Robert Mapplethorpe, Joel Meyerowitz, Bill Owens, James Van Der Zee, and more.

Dawoud Bey, Untitled #2 (Trees and Farmhouse), 2017. Courtesy Stephen Daiter Gallery.

Dawoud Bey, Untitled #2 (Trees and Farmhouse) (2017). Courtesy Stephen Daiter Gallery.

What are you personally most looking forward to?

I’m particularly excited to have a new series of work by Dawoud Bey, which will be shown in New York for the first time at AIPAD. It’s called Night Coming Tenderly, Black and will be at Stephen Daiter Gallery. His work will be in an exhibition at the Whitney and SFMoMA next year. Dawoud is also kicking off our AIPAD Talks on Thursday

Have you noticed any trends in what what galleries will be showing this year?

AIPAD has always been strong in the field of portraiture and this year is particularly exciting with iconic work from a wide range of photographers including Harry Benson, George Platt Lynes, Sally Mann, Zanele Muholi, Irving Penn, Mickalene Thomas, and many more.

Richard Moore, President of AIPAD. Image Courtesy © Julienne Schaer.

Richard Moore, President of AIPAD

Are there any artists that had perhaps been overlooked that we will see at AIPAD?  

Two stand out in my mind. One is Ed Sievers: his black-and-white work from the ’70s was a noteworthy discovery and will be at Robert Mann Gallery. Likewise, Jane Evelyn Atwood’s photography has not received the attention it deserves and will be presented by L. Parker Stephenson Photographs. Of course, the fair will be full of other surprises as well. 

Jane Evelyn Atwood, Self-Portrait, New York (1979). Courtesy L. Parker Stephenson Photographs.

Jane Evelyn Atwood, Self-Portrait, New York (1979). Courtesy L. Parker Stephenson Photographs.

Do you have any advice for new collectors of photography?

Buying art can be daunting, especially in the beginning, so be sure to work with dealers that have a deep understanding of the photography they represent and are willing to share their expertise and connoisseurship.

Are there any exciting new-comer galleries to the fair?

There are 15 new participants from around the world, but we’re also welcoming two new AIPAD members, Utópica from São Paulo, the organization’s first member in Brazil, and Arnika Dawkins Gallery from Atlanta.

Delphine Diallos, Highness-serie 2 (2015). Courtesy of Arnika Dawkins Gallery.

Delphine Diallos, Highness-serie 2 (2015). Courtesy of Arnika Dawkins Gallery.

Speaking of AIPAD’s anniversary, are there any gallery anniversaries?

A founding member of AIPAD, Halsted Gallery of Birmingham, Michigan, has its 50th anniversary this year. The gallery was founded by the remarkable Tom Halsted in 1969 at a time when such a thing was unheard of. Unfortunately the world lost Tom late last year and I, like everyone who knew him, miss his caring friendship and his boundless support and love of photography.     

The Photography Show hosted by AIPAD is on view at Pier 94, April 4–7.


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