12 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Lucia Fainzilber, TDC 03 - Three Course Dinner Series (2015). Courtesy of Praxis.
Lucia Fainzilber, TDC 03 – Three Course Dinner Series (2015). Courtesy of Praxis.
Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

Andi Fischer
KROKODIL + LÖWE leichte Probleme
Sies + Höke Galerie
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Andi Fischer, KROKODIL + LÖWE leichte Probleme (2019). Courtesy of Sies + Höke Galerie

Andi Fischer, KROKODIL + LÖWE leichte Probleme (2019). Courtesy of Sies + Höke Galerie.

Who’s stronger: the crocodile or the lion? You can be the judge in these new works by Berlin-based artist Andi Fischer at Düsseldorf’s Sies + Höke Galerie.

—Alexandra Schott

Gregory Crewdson
Production Still (Esther Terrace 02)
Craven Contemporary LLC
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Gregory Crewdson, Production Still (Esther Terrace 02), 2006. Courtesy of Craven Contemporary LLC.

Gregory Crewdson, Production Still (Esther Terrace 02) (2006). Courtesy of Craven Contemporary LLC.

Crewdson creates an unsettling yet intriguing atmosphere in this deserted suburban scene. As is often the case with his photography, you’re left wondering about the narrative both before and after the image was taken. 

—Karin Petit

Dan Christensen
Si, Three
Berry Campbell Gallery
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Dan Christensen, Si, Three (2003). Courtesy of Berry Campbell.

Dan Christensen, Si, Three (2003). Courtesy of Berry Campbell.

Created during the last decade of the artist’s career, this work truly embodies the artist’s fearless relationship with color, which stems from his roots in Lyrical Abstraction and Color Field painting. 

—Nan Stewart

J. Scott Nicol
Steve Jobs Apple Computer Technology Is Nothing
Photorealism Gallery
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J. Scott Nicol, Steve Jobs Apple Computer Technology Is Nothing (2019). Courtesy of Photorealism Gallery.

J. Scott Nicol, Steve Jobs Apple Computer Technology Is Nothing (2019). Courtesy of Photorealism Gallery.

J. Scott Nicol is known for his photorealist paintings of books and bookshelves that come in the tradition of 19th-century American trompe-l’œil painters like William Harnett, but updated to include popular contemporary publications.

—Julia Yook

Lucia Fainzilber
TDC 01_b Three Course Dinner Series
Praxis
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Lucia Fainzilber, TDC 01_b Three Course Dinner Series (2015). Courtesy of Praxis.

Lucia Fainzilber, TDC 01_b Three Course Dinner Series (2015). Courtesy of Praxis.

Every part of your life should be aesthetically pleasing, even cracking open a lobster with your bare hands. From the sparkly red nail polish matching the lobster’s shell to the chili pepper sliced à la Damien Hirst’s formaldehyde shark, this Lucia Fainzilber work is a sexy, surreal dreamscape. 

—Cristina Cruz

Marc Riboud
These people’s houses have been destroyed to make way for new tower blocks. Waiting to be rehoused, they live in shanty towns. Shanghai.
Galerija Fotografija
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Marc Riboud, These people’s houses have been destroyed to make way for new tower blocks. Waiting to be rehoused, they live in shanty towns. Shanghai (1992). Courtesy of Galerija Fotografija.

Marc Riboud, These people’s houses have been destroyed to make way for new tower blocks. Waiting to be rehoused, they live in shanty towns. Shanghai (1992). Courtesy of Galerija Fotografija.

Although Riboud made this photograph nearly 30 years ago, it’s lost none of its relevance in contemporary time with its message of social inequality and migrant displacement.

—Miriam Minak

Henry Moore
Reclining Figure
Sigrid Freundorfer Fine Art
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Henry Moore, Reclining Figure (1940). Courtesy of Sigrid Freundorfer Fine Art.

Henry Moore, Reclining Figure (1940). Courtesy of Sigrid Freundorfer Fine Art.

Though most people might picture an abstract bronze sculpture when thinking of Henry Moore, here it’s crayon and pencil strokes in this work on paper that create the quintessential reclining nude so central to Moore’s oeuvre.

—Neha Jambhekar

Margarita Cabrera
Space in Between: Nopal (Sol Espinoza)
Ruiz-Healy Art
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Margarita Cabrera, Space in Between: Nopal (Sol Espinoza) (2016). Ruiz-Healy Art

Margarita Cabrera, Space in Between: Nopal (Sol Espinoza) (2016). Ruiz-Healy Art.

Reflecting the unyieldingly oppressive climate along the US-Mexico border, Margarita Cabrera transforms the narrative with her “Space in Between” sculptures. These sculptures, sewn out of United States border patrol uniforms and embroidery crafted by immigrant workers, represent various life-size cacti native in the Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. I truly appreciate Cabrera’s work of turning a negative reality into a positive representation of immigrant communities.

—Qadira Farrington

Carmen Neely
Heard Quitting and Seen Dancing
 Jane Lombard Gallery
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Carmen Neely, Heard quitting and seen dancing (2019). Courtesy of Jane Lombard Gallery.

Carmen Neely, Heard Quitting and Seen Dancing (2019). Courtesy of Jane Lombard Gallery.

Neely’s work is refreshing in today’s figurative-heavy emerging scene. Her paintings are sensual and corporeal, maintaining their distinct femininity through the expressive abstraction by using embroideries and shades found in beauty palettes.

—Santiago Garcia Cano

Takashi Murakami
Amitabha Buddha (Gold Enso)
Kumi Contemporary & Verso Contemporary
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Takashi Murakami, Amitabha Buddha (Gold Enso) (2015). Courtesy of Kumi Contemporary & Verso Contemporary.

Takashi Murakami, Amitabha Buddha (Gold Enso) (2015). Courtesy of Kumi Contemporary & Verso Contemporary.

“Amitabha” means infinite light, which is perfect title for this simple but eye-catching circle on a subtle background, which combines a precious gold with a subtle vanitas skull motif.

—Sara Carson

Kyosuke Tchinai
Ile au Camélia
Galerie Tamenaga
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Kyosuke Tchinai, Ile au Camélia. Courtesy Galerie Tamenaga.

Kyosuke Tchinai, Ile au Camélia. Courtesy Galerie Tamenaga.

There is such harmony in this piece with the stormy pink waters, the calm and peaceful camelia flower with the sturdy mountains in the distance. What’s not to love?!

—Tara Wyant

Ma Dan
The Ripples Caused by Bosch Ship
Amy Li Gallery
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Ma Dan, The Ripples Caused by Bosch Ship (2019). Courtesy of Amy Li Gallery.

Ma Dan, The Ripples Caused by Bosch Ship (2019). Courtesy of Amy Li Gallery.

The work is inspired by and responds to Hieronymus Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights (1503–15). The bright colors and surrealistic context derived from the original are combined curious additions (a rubber ducky, for instance) that bring viewers back to childhood.

—Yi Zhang


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