10 Artworks From Artnet’s Gallery Network That Our Experts Are Loving This Week

Each week, our gallery liaisons share their favorite works from the Artnet Gallery Network.

Julio Larraz, L'heure de L'aperitif (2015). Courtesy of Galeria Duque Arango.

Every week, we explore the thousands of galleries on the Artnet Gallery Network to highlight the spaces and artworks inspiring us right now. Take a look at our latest picks below.

 

Ethan Gill
Checking the Temperature
Luis De Jesus Los Angeles
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Ethan Gill, Checking the Temperature (2019). Courtesy of Luis De Jesus Los Angeles.

Ethan Gill, Checking the Temperature (2019). Courtesy of Luis De Jesus Los Angeles.

Daylight savings time is just two weeks away meaning that soon enough I won’t be able to use the  “it’s too cold” excuse not to swim my laps anymore. In Ethan Gill’s comical depiction of a foot “checking the temperature” of a pool, the foot (or, dare I say, cankle) is reduced to a rectangle that ends in curved toes. The foot juts into the pool, cutting across the pool tiles in perfect symmetry. Bubbles, blue tones, and humorous subject matter together make this an incredibly fun work. 

—Cristina Cruz

Lynne Drexler
Fire Bush
Jody Klotz Fine Art
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Lynne Drexler, Fire Bush (1963). Courtesy of Jody Klotz Fine Art.

Lynne Drexler, Fire Bush (1963). Courtesy of Jody Klotz Fine Art.

American artist Lynne Drexler created vibrant, colorful paintings with lively brushstrokes influenced by Hans Hofman and Henri Matisse. She was also a lover of classical music, and like Hans Hofmann espoused the belief that each color and shape had its own specific rhythm. In this painting particularly Drexler seems to be translating sound into color. 

—Julia Yook

Kathleen Kinkopf
Aerial Dance
International Art Acquisitions
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Kathleen Kinkopf, Aerial Dance (circa 2010). Courtesy of International Art Acquisitions.

Kathleen Kinkopf, Aerial Dance (circa 2010). Courtesy of International Art Acquisitions.

Painter Kathleen Kinkopf creates moody paintings that touch on the carnivalesque and the surreal. In this work, we see the bare back of a woman with white cloth wrapped around her, who sits in an engulfing darkness. Above her, a white cloth swirls in the sky, in an unusual touch that brings to mind an era of classical simplicity. 

—Karin Petit

Shilpa Gupta
For, In Your tongue, I Cannot Fit
Galleria Continua
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Shilpa Gupta, For, In Your Tongue, I Cannot Fit (2019). Courtesy of Galleria Continua.

Shilpa Gupta, For, In Your Tongue, I Cannot Fit (2019). Courtesy of Galleria Continua.

Why are these apparently worn-out books displayed and illuminated in this beautifully designed glass case? And more than that, why are they tied up with a metal strap, thus unable to be opened nor read. A closer look is revealing: the books are actually cast in gunmetal, a material originally used to make weapons. The authors referenced by Guptra too are a range of poets who were restricted or imprisoned because of their political or social commitment throughout history. Against this background, one is inclined to make the authors’ voices heard, to free the presented poems from their imprisonment and carry them out into the world.

—Miriam Minak

Yashua Klos
Shelter In Your Shadow
Tilton Gallery
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Yashua Klos, Shelter In Your Shadow (2019). Courtesy of Tilton Gallery.

Yashua Klos, Shelter In Your Shadow (2019). Courtesy of Tilton Gallery.

This portrait is striking to me because of the use of different shapes and textures to create the image. The composition makes it look as if the figure’s head was floating and seemingly collided into this wooden structure and the two parts became one.

—Qadira Farrington

Julio Larraz
Knight Rider
Galeria Duque Arango
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Julio Larraz, Knight Rider (2019). Courtesy of Galeria Duque Arango.

Julio Larraz, Knight Rider (2019). Courtesy of Galeria Duque Arango.

Larraz’s cinematic scenes fall somewhere between realism and cartoon. The works possess the surreal quality of snapshots belonging to a political thriller set in a neo-Latin American state. Knight Rider is sensual and mysterious, with a beautiful sense of color used to create this evocative nighttime ride. 

—Santiago Garcia Cano

Matt Marga
1 Million Queen
Ventique Fine Art
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Matt Marga, 1 Million Queen (2018). Courtesy of Ventique Fine Art.

Matt Marga, 1 Million Queen (2018). Courtesy of Ventique Fine Art.

This monumental piece of public art was placed on Park Lane, London, and depicts the profile of the city’s most iconic resident, Queen Elizabeth II. Made up of 999,999 crystals on optical glass, the work also contains 53 real diamonds, referring to the 53 member countries of the Commonwealth and to the Queen’s 1953 coronation. 

—Sara Carson

Neha Vedpathak
I Can See Through This
Sundaram Tagore
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Neha Vedpathak, I Can See Through This (2018). Courtesy of Sundaram Tagore.

Neha Vedpathak, I Can See Through This (2018). Courtesy of Sundaram Tagore.

Neha Vedpathak takes paper, a traditionally two-dimensional medium and meticulously plucks the fibers, bringing it to life in such a textured, almost sculptural manner. I particularly like this work, as it is different than most works in the exhibition, which are more abstract. In this work, it seems like we are looking through a window, or a fence, into a garden scene. 

—Tara Wyant

 

Johannes Wohnseifer
Holes XII (Rihanna)
Galleri K
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Johannes Wohnseifer, Holes XII (Rihanna) (2012). Courtesy of Galleri K.

Johannes Wohnseifer, Holes XII (Rihanna) (2012). Courtesy of Galleri K.

Made of different fragments of graphics collaged together, this work connects visuals culled from everyday life with letters and images in a seemingly random arrangement. Here a pixelated image of Rihanna is shown surrounded by the word “holes” along with repeated graphics of scissors, almost as though the image is a paper doll asking to be cut out. 

—Tobias Molitor

Wucius Wong
Heart of Autumn #4
Alisan Fine Arts
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Wucius Wong, Heart of Autumn #4 (1999). Courtesy of Alisan Fine Arts.

Wucius Wong, Heart of Autumn #4 (1999). Courtesy of Alisan Fine Arts.

Internationally acclaimed ink artist Wucius Wong (b. 1936 Dongguan, Guangdong, China) received Asian Culture C support in 1970 to visit New York and study painting and print-making at the Pratt Graphics Center. The vivid colors of New York in autumn were engraved in Wong`s mind and the orchestration of red, orange, and yellow on the trees inspired him to express ink art in a contemporary manner. As an important figure in the New Ink Movement, Wong brought a revolutionary perception of ink art to the world. Today, Wong’s works remain highly sought-after in the art world. His outstanding contribution in continuing ink pioneer, Lui Shou-Kwan`s legacy of the New Ink Movement gained him an indispensable place in the art history of Hong Kong.

—Yi Zhang


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